On this page

I. Introduction
II. Expectations
III. Jurisdiction
IV. Definitions
V. Community Standards
VI. Student Conduct Process
VII. Interim Administrative Action
VIII. Maintenance and Review of Student Conduct Files
IX. Interpretation and Revision


I. INTRODUCTION

Wheaton College is dedicated to fostering a living and learning environment that promotes discussion and collaboration between and among its community members – an environment that empowers and enriches every student. The students of Wheaton College developed the following Honor Code which has created an ethos of mutually shared respect and offers individual freedom to explore interests and learn in an open and collaborative environment: 

As members of the Wheaton community, we commit ourselves to act honestly, responsibly, and above all, with honor and integrity in all areas of campus life. We are accountable for all that we say and write. We are responsible for the academic integrity of our work. We pledge that we will not misrepresent our work nor give or receive unauthorized aid. We commit ourselves to behave in a manner which demonstrates concern for the personal dignity, rights and freedoms of all members of the community. We are respectful of college property and the property of others. We will not tolerate a lack of respect for these values.

The Community Standards and Student Conduct Process have been formulated to reaffirm the ideals and principles encompassed in the Wheaton College Honor Code and have been developed with an educational design focused on communal accountability and individual growth. The Community Standards provide an outline of expectations to promote individual and community success in their living and learning experience, while the Student Conduct Process provides an intentional opportunity for reflection and restoration around decision making and goal setting.  

II. EXPECTATIONS

As Wheaton’s Honor Code mandates, all members of the Wheaton community are expected to behave in ways which demonstrate care and respect for the personal dignity, rights, and freedoms of all members of the community, and to demonstrate care and respect for College property and the property of others. As members of the Wheaton community, we all share responsibility for safeguarding the rights and freedoms of other members and for maintaining community standards. Specifically, these shared expectations and responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. To observe and adhere to the Honor Code and Community Standards and to comply with appropriate requests;
  2. To accept responsibility for and monitor the behavior of guests and visitors; and
  3. To address violations of the Honor Code and Community Standards.

Wheaton College assumes that students are adults and responsible for their own conduct. The fact that the College takes proactive steps to address violations, actions, or activities that may pose a risk to the well-being of the community does not absolve students from taking responsibility for their own behavior. As such, students and Student Organizations, teams, and groups who breach the trust and values of the Honor Code shall be held accountable for their actions. This document, known as the Community Standards, defines the rights and responsibilities of students and provides a process for responding to allegations of student misconduct in a way that accords with the values of the College (the “Student Conduct Process”).

III. JURISDICTION

The College Student Code of Conduct shall apply to any behavior on College premises or in connection with College-sponsored, College-supervised or College-affiliated events, programs, and activities (including students involved with off-campus internships, study abroad programs, and recognized or unrecognized Student Organizations) or off-campus behavior that adversely affects the College community or the pursuit of its objectives or calls into question the suitability of a student as a member of the Wheaton College community; such conduct is subject to the College’s Student Conduct Process. A student, defined as any individual who has been admitted to the College, registered for classes, currently living and/or learning at Wheaton College or its affiliated programs, up until the time of the actual award of degree shall be responsible for their conduct and must adhere to the Honor Code and Community Standards.

  1. Each student shall be responsible for their conduct from the time of admission through the actual awarding of a degree, or moving out of College-sponsored housing after graduation, whichever comes last, even though conduct may occur before classes begin or after classes end, as well as during the academic year and during periods between terms of actual enrollment (and even if their conduct is not discovered until after a degree is awarded).
  2. The Community Standards shall apply to a student’s conduct even if the student withdraws from the College while a Community Standards matter is pending. The College may, at its discretion, continue with the Student Conduct Process even after a respondent has withdrawn, graduated, or taken a leave of absence if the alleged violation occurred while the respondent was an active student.
  3. Each Student Organization may be held responsible for the conduct of any of its members or guests in addition to any sanctions received by any student members in their individual capacity.
  4. While the College does not regularly monitor the language and/or actions of students on public social media platforms, the College may hold students accountable for use of social media that violates the Community Standards, College Policy, and/or the law. Examples of such conduct include but are not limited to harassing and threatening behavior.
  5. Student Conduct proceedings may be initiated against a student or Student Organization charged with conduct that potentially violates both the criminal law and Community Standards (that is, if both possible violations result from the same factual situation) without regard to the pendency of civil litigation or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under the Community Standards may be carried out prior to or simultaneously with civil or criminal proceedings at the discretion of the Procedural Coordinator, or designee. The College cooperates with law enforcement, or other agencies, in the enforcement of laws on campus and in regards to its students. This includes providing information requested by subpoena or as otherwise permitted by law. Determinations made or sanctions imposed under the Community Standards shall not be subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts giving rise to violation of College rules were dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of or against the criminal law defendant.
  6. Sexual and Gender-based Misconduct, including but not limited to, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, and sexual harassment are prohibited under the College’s Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies and will be responded to via the policies found here. 
  7. Alleged violations involving Academic Integrity violations of the Honor Code, where a student does not have a previous Academic Integrity violation may be adjudicated by the Faculty Member.  The Faculty Member is required to meet with the student to discuss the allegations and determine a finding based on the preponderance of evidence standard.  The Respondent is entitled to the appeals process as outlined in this document.  Any subsequent alleged violations will be referred to the Student Conduct Process as outlined below. 
  8. Generally, the influence of drugs and/or alcohol on a student’s judgment or behavior will not be accepted as a mitigating factor with respect to the resolution of an act of misconduct.
  9. Students are responsible for the consequences of their actions even when the conduct may have been influenced by their physical or emotional state (irrespective of any medical or clinical diagnoses). Students seeking an accommodation are encouraged to review Section VI.3.I: Accommodations for Students with Disabilities of this document for additional information.
  10. Students are responsible for the contents of their rooms, cars, lockers, or person regardless of claims of personal ownership. Students may also be held responsible for shared common areas.
  11. Students and Student Organizations are responsible for the conduct of their guests and should be with guests at all times. Guests may be removed from the College at the discretion of Campus Safety and the Dean of Students.
  12. Students and Student Organizations may be held accountable under the Community Standards for the Student Organization’s misconduct and/or for the misconduct of any one or more of its leaders, members, guests, or other representatives.
  13. Students and Student Organizations are prohibited from conducting their own disciplinary proceedings prior to resolution of alleged violations of the Community Standards.
  14. Nothing in the Community Standards shall preclude holding students who are members of a Student Organization responsible for their individual violations of the Community Standards committed in the context of or in association with the Student Organization’s alleged violation of the Community Standards. Both the Student Organization and individual students may be found responsible for violations of the Community Standards in connection with the same behavior.
  15. Parental Notification: As permitted by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the College may notify parents/guardians when students under the age of 21 have been found responsible for violating the College’s alcohol or drug policies.
  16. Inter-departmental Notification: As permitted by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the Procedural Coordinator, or designee may notify other College officials and/or College offices and departments (including but not limited to Athletics, SAIL, Academic Advising, and Global Education) with a legitimate educational interest of situations with potential impact on a student’s ability to participate in activities sponsored by these offices and/or continue their education at Wheaton College.

IV. DEFINITIONS

Advisor. Any person who accompanies a respondent or complainant, for the limited purpose of providing support and guidance. An advisor of your choice may not directly address the Conduct Officer, College Hearing Board, or Appellate Officer, question witnesses, or otherwise actively participate in the Student Conduct Process. An advisor cannot be a complainant, respondent, witness, or other party involved in the case being discussed. Typically, requests to change proposed meetings to accommodate an Advisor’s schedule will not be considered.

Appellate Officer. The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee.

Business Day. Any day, Monday through Friday, when the College is open.

Campus Safety. Responsible for the general safety of the Wheaton community. More information can be found on the Campus Safety website.

College. Wheaton College of Massachusetts.

College Official. Any person authorized by the College to perform administrative, instructional, or professional duties.

College Hearing Board. A board composed of faculty, staff, and students to adjudicate alleged violations of the Honor Code and Community Standards, assigned by the Procedural Coordinator.

College Premises. All land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of or owned, used, or controlled by the College.

Community Member. Any student, faculty, College official, alumni, or any other person employed by the College. The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee, will determine a person’s status with the institution.

Student Conduct File. Any printed, written, or electronic file which may include but is not limited to incident report(s), correspondence, academic transcript, witness statements, and student conduct history.

Complainant. The College or any individual who believes they experienced a violation of the policies outlined in the Honor Code and/or Community Standards and becomes a party to the Student Conduct Process.

Conduct Officer. A College official designated and trained by the Procedural Coordinator or designee, to facilitate an Educational Conference or Conduct Review Meeting to determine responsibility of alleged violations of the College’s Community Standards; and impose sanctions, and serve on a College Hearing Board.

Conduct Review Meeting. A formal meeting between a Respondent and a Conduct Officer, to determine if a violation of the Honor Code or Community Standards has occurred based on the preponderance of the evidence. Conduct Review Meetings will still occur if a student accepts responsibility for the violation of the Community Standards to allow for an educational conversation and determine appropriate sanctioning.

Designee. A staff or faculty member who is responsible for implementing or administering the Student Conduct Process, in part or in whole, at the direction of the Procedural Coordinator, or other College official.

Disciplinary Hold. An administrative hold placed on a student’s record or on a Student Organization’s activities or privileges when the student or Student Organization does not respond to the request of a College official to attend a Conduct Review Meeting, has not completed an assigned sanction, or, with respect to a student, has withdrawn from the College while a conduct matter is pending.

Good Standing. In order to participate in leadership positions, study abroad programs, and a variety of other programs and opportunities, students must fulfill their academic and social responsibilities to Wheaton College through maintaining “Good Standing” in each of these areas. 

Academic Good Standing is achieved through the following:

  • Earning the appropriate number of credits and maintaining a satisfactory G.P.A.
  • Abiding by the College’s Academic Policies and abiding by any other standard or policy of the College which applies to academic conduct.

Questions regarding issues relating to academic good standing and related academic matters may be directed to the Registrar’s Office or the Office of Academic Advising.

Social Good Standing is achieved through abiding by:

  • The Honor Code and Community Standards
  • Any other standard or policy of the College which applies to community standards
  • Students placed on conduct probation are not considered to be in Good Social Standing with the College.

Questions related to social good standing and expectations of conduct may be made to the Dean of Students Office.

Guest. A non-student who is an associate or invitee of a student and/or Student Organization, or any person visiting a residential space that they are not assigned to.

Honor Code. The Honor Code serves as an understanding and expression of how the Wheaton College community should act in all areas of campus life.

Incident Report. A written summary of an incident.

Interim Administrative Action. Non-disciplinary, immediate action taken by the College to protect its community when there is information to indicate that alleged behavior is threatening the health or well-being of a community member or the community at large. Interim Administrative Actions may include but are not limited to, an Order of No Contact, interim restrictions, removal from campus, or relocation within the residential system. More information listed in Section VII of this document.

May. A term that is used in the permissive sense.

Preponderance of the Evidence. Determinations of responsible or not responsible are based on the preponderance of evidence (i.e., “more likely than not”) as determined at a Conduct Review Meeting or by the College Hearing Board.

Procedural Coordinator: The Associate Vice President for Student Affairs, Assistant Dean for Residential Life, or designee responsible for the day-to-day oversight of the Student Conduct Process.

Respondent. A student alleged to have violated the Honor Code and/or Community Standards and who becomes a party to the Student Conduct Process.

Shall and Will. Words that are used in the imperative sense.

Safety Always Matters Most (SAMM). Student health and safety is a responsibility shared by all members of the Wheaton community and it is our obligation to act with care and respect for each other. Students who seek appropriate medical aid due to an incident of intoxication (alcohol or other intoxicants) either for themselves or for other students generally will not be subject to disciplinary action through the Student Conduct Process.

Sanction(s). Assigned outcomes that a Respondent must abide by and/or complete when found responsible for violating the Honor Code and/or Community Standards.

Student. Any person who has been admitted to, registered or enrolled in, or attended/attends the College, any College course, or College-sponsored program.

Student Organization. An association or group of persons, including, but not limited to, any Student Organization, team or club, that has complied with the formal requirements for recognition by the Student Government Association, or are otherwise recognized by the College.

Witness. Any person with knowledge of an alleged violation of the Honor Code and/or Community Standards and may become a party of the Student Conduct Process.

V. COMMUNITY STANDARDS

The following list of behaviors is intended to represent the types of acts that constitute violations of the Community Standards. Although the list is extensive, it should not be regarded as all-inclusive. The College may, in its discretion, determine if an action or behavior, not listed below, is detrimental to the community and constitutes a violation of the Wheaton College Honor Code and/or Community Standards.  All community members are responsible for knowing and observing all Policies.

Abuse of the Student Conduct Process
Any conduct that disrupts, discourages participation, or manipulates the Student Conduct Process including, but not limited to:
  • Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a student conduct proceeding.
  • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information to a Conduct Officer or the College Hearing Board.
  • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the Student Conduct Process.
  • Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the Student Conduct Process.
  • Attempting to intimidate or retaliate against a member of an investigator, Conduct Officer or other hearing body, a complainant, respondent or witness, prior to, during, and/or after a student conduct proceeding.
  • Entering a student conduct review meeting in bad faith
  • Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed as a result of the Student Conduct Process.
Academic Integrity
Any conduct that threatens the high standards of academic integrity and the College’s Honor Code, including, but not limited to:
  • Cheating: Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids. Cheating may occur on an assignment, examination, test, quiz, laboratory work report, theme, online work, or on any other work submitted by a student. This applies whether the work is performed in class or out of class. Cheating includes but is not limited to:
    • The use of artificial intelligence software to produce an assignment, unless otherwise permitted by the faculty member.
    • Copying from the work of another student, unauthorized notes or textbooks, unauthorized electronic devices, or other unauthorized materials. The instructor has final authority to determine what devices or aids are permissible. In the absence of guidance, the University expects that students will consult with the instructor.
    • During a quiz, test, or examination, or in-class assignment, all materials, information or aids are considered unauthorized unless specifically permitted by the instructor. The mere presence of unauthorized materials, information or aids in the testing area or in bathrooms during the administration of a quiz, test, examination or in-class assignment is a violation of this policy.
    • The substantive use of translation services (online translation, in-person language tutors, or other assistive persons, applications, or devices) without prior authorization. For example, the use of the translation services becomes substantive when the aid is more than to correct mere word choices or the structure of particular sentences.
    • Giving or receiving substantive information or assistance on assigned work when it is expected that students will do their own work or engaging in any similar act that violates the concept of academic integrity. The general expectation is that all students will work independently on all assignments unless specifically authorized by the instructor in the syllabus or assignment materials.
  • Plagiarism: Representing the work, words, and/or ideas of another (including work created by generative artificial intelligence) as one’s own, whether deliberate or accidental, with or without the consent of the originating person(s), organization(s), and/or entity(ies). Plagiarism violates long-established ethical norms of attribution and is fundamentally an act of intellectual theft.  Thus, it is a serious violation wherever it occurs.  In academic settings, plagiarism may result in a failing grade on an assignment or in a course, and in some cases probation or expulsion.  In many professional settings, it can result in a range of disciplinary actions, which may or may not also include legal consequences.  Plagiarism may occur on virtually any type of work submitted for a grade or other form of credit to fulfill either in whole or in part a course requirement, or as part of an educational activity (e.g., design shows, conferences). This includes submitting as one’s own either in part of in whole work done by one or more individuals, one or more enterprises or entities, whether commercial or non-commercial, including websites. A common misperception about plagiarism is that it is only an issue in formal academic writing such as analytical essays and research papers.  Plagiarism may also occur in creative writing, blog posts, journalism, informal writing, classroom or other public presentations, speeches, lab reports, and in mathematical solutions, computational code, musical composition, visual art or design, etc. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to:
    • Misrepresentation caused by failure to document acknowledged sources accurately, thoroughly, and appropriately;
    • The use of unacknowledged sources: use of information or phrasing from any source not cited or included in the bibliography and referenced by the student;
    • Submitting as one’s own work done by, copied from, substantively translated by or purchased from another person or entity.
  • Falsification: Invention or alteration of any information or citation. Falsification includes knowingly reporting data, research or reports so that either the process or the product is shown to be different from what actually occurred; falsely reporting having met responsibilities of attendance or participation in class, practicum, internship or other types of field work experience; or submission of falsified excuses for tardiness or not attending or participating in such experiences.
  • Text recycling or self-plagiarism: The submission of work to meet the requirements of one assignment when it was done in whole or in part to meet the requirements of another assignment, exercise or similar academic purpose, unless approval to do so has been granted by the instructor.
    Facilitating or soliciting academic dishonesty: Soliciting the assistance of another to commit an act of academic dishonesty; intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another commit an act of academic dishonesty. Facilitation is any offer, whether acted upon or not, for unauthorized assistance on any academic work. Solicitation is any request, whether acted upon or not, for unauthorized assistance on any academic work. Students should be aware of a request or assistance that violates this code, because it either violates another provision of this code, such as plagiarism, cheating or falsification, or it is expressly forbidden by the instructor or the culture of the academic discipline.
  • Fraud or misrepresentation in academic claims: Fraud or misrepresentation is the verbal or written submission of any information or document to a College official, which the student knows or reasonably should have known to be inaccurate, false, fraudulent or otherwise misleading. The College does not need to have relied on this information in order for the act to be fraud or misrepresentation. For example, fraud or misrepresentation may occur at any point in the admissions process. Examples of behaviors that would constitute fraud or misrepresentation in the admissions process include, but are not limited to, failure to disclose student disciplinary or criminal record, falsely reporting grades or test scores and submitting forged transcripts, letters of recommendation or other records.
  • Other academic misconduct: No specific set of rules or definitions can embrace every act of academic misconduct. A student who employs any form of academic deceit has violated the intellectual enterprise of the
    College.
Acceptable Data/Network Use

Students are expected to maintain appropriate use of the Wheaton College campus data network, including in-room connection services in all residence halls, computer systems, and other electronic services, in compliance with all College, Town, County, State, and Federal laws and regulations. For more information, review the Student Acceptable Use Policy.

Alcohol
Students are expected to abide by the College’s Alcohol Policy.
  • Persons under 21 years of age may not possess or consume alcohol, including having other students over-or-under the age of 21 possessing or consuming alcohol in their assigned room.
  • No person over the age of 21 may possess or consume alcohol in any place other than their assigned room, or an assigned room of another student who is over the age of 21, unless it is a college event where alcohol is permitted in the event guidelines. . 
  • Persons 21 years of age or older may not purchase or distribute alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 years of age.
  • No person or room may possess a common source of alcohol, defined as kegs, beerballs, boxed wine, or any other source of alcohol that can be distributed or consumed by multiple people.  
  • No person may use or possess funnels, tables used for beer pong, or other drinking game paraphernalia, with or without alcohol.
  • Excessive consumption and/or presenting signs of intoxication, including not being able to care for oneself due to alcohol consumption, are not permitted.
  • Students may not keep empty alcohol containers as decoration in campus residences.
Animals

For the safety, health, and well-being of all residents, pets are prohibited in all College Residential Buildings and houses with the exception of small fish in no more than a 10-gallon tank. All approved Service or Support animals must be approved through Campus Accessibility Services and documented with Residential Life prior to their arrival on campus as outlined by the Service and Assistance Animals Policy.

College Policies

Any conduct that violates any published college policies or rules, whether or not specifically listed in the Community Standards.

Collusion

Any conduct, through actions or inactions, assisting, facilitating, or encouraging others to violate the Honor Code and/or Community Standards.

Damage and Destruction

Any conduct that facilitates or engages in damaging or misusing property, which includes, but not limited to, attempted or actual damage to or misuse of College property or other personal or public property.

Disruptive Behavior

Any conduct that unreasonably interferes with the activities of individuals or groups in the College community, and/or creates a disruption or disturbance in an off-campus setting. This can include but is not limited to, classroom or community disruptions (e.g., classroom outbursts, unreasonable noise, large parties, rude and abusive language, or behavior).

Drugs

Students are expected to abide by the College’s Drug Policy.

  • The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of controlled substances is prohibited on College property and at College-sponsored events.
  • The use, possession, distribution, or cultivation of marijuana for medical or recreational purposes is prohibited in any Wheaton College residence hall or on any other premises; nor is it allowed at any College-sponsored event or activity off campus or any Student Organization event or activity.
  • The misuse of medication or prescription drugs, including opiates/painkillers and other psychoactive drugs, is prohibited. This includes possession or consumption of medication or prescription drugs that are not prescribed to you, consumption of more than the recommended dose, sharing prescriptions, or the consumption of prescriptions for a reason other than the intended use.
  • The use and possession of drug paraphernalia are prohibited in any Wheaton College residence hall or on any other premises; nor is it allowed at any College-sponsored event or activity off campus or any Student Organization event or activity. Drug paraphernalia includes, but is not limited to any product which its intended use is for drug consumption (i.e. bong or pipe) or preparation for consumption (i.e. grinders and rolling papers).
Failure to Comply

Any conduct that does not comply with the Community Standards as outlined in this document and/or the instructions from College officials (e.g., Residential Life staff, Campus Safety, Faculty etc.) acting in their duties, including the parameters of any restrictions issued as interim measures or sanctions as communicated by a College official.

Falsification

Any conduct knowingly furnishing or possessing false information or forged materials, documents, records, instruments, or identification, or false reporting of emergency or threatening situations.

Fire Safety

Students are expected to abide by the Fire Safety Regulations and Prevention policy.

  • The burning of incense, candles, sterno, kerosene or oil lamps, and use of non-safety matches is prohibited, even during a loss of electrical power. Even if unlit, these items are prohibited in the residence halls and theme houses because they pose a potential serious fire hazard. 
  • Students are prohibited from creating or participating in a fire hazard or situation that endangers others, including but not limited to, arson and constructing an open fire without a permit. Fire pits are prohibited.
  • State regulations require any residence hall curtains or draperies to be of fiberglass or other non-combustible material and that upholstered furniture be flame-retardant. Mattress pads with exposed foam, commonly in an “egg shape” are prohibited. 
  • Light duty extension cords are prohibited (only UL approved heavy gauge extension cords with 3 prong connections are permitted).
  • Appliances, such as hot plates, immersion heaters, electric space heaters, or any appliances with open heating elements are not permitted. Irons may only be used in laundry rooms. Cooking in student rooms is prohibited.
  • The storage and use of Hoverboards and electric scooters are prohibited.
  • Hookahs, electronic cigarettes, and other smoking or vaping devices are prohibited.
  • The use of paper or other flammable items as decorations is forbidden around lighting fixtures, exit signs, on hall doors or ceilings of rooms. The use of live Christmas (holiday) trees or wreaths are prohibited and caution should be used with any other holiday decorations. Halogen lamps are prohibited.
  • String lights that are battery operated and/or LED are permitted in individual residence hall rooms.  These lights must not be wrapped around pipes, displayed over doorways, or near sprinkler heads, smoke detectors, or other forms of fire safety equipment. 
  • Wall coverings cannot exceed 25% of total wall surface (per wall). Tapestries and other cloth banners are prohibited.
  • No items can be hung from ceilings, lights, exit signs, pipes, or sprinkler heads, anything attached to the wall must be adhered at four corners.
  • Furniture and personal belongings must be stored in areas clear from hallways and means of egress from an individual room, suite, or building.  All doors must open more than 45 degrees to allow for appropriate entrance/exit from a room, suite, or building.
  • Smoke detectors, located in each room, should not be covered or otherwise obstructed with any type of cloth or other decorative material.
  • Tampering with fire detection and safety equipment, calling in false fire alarms, and possession of explosive or incendiary materials and devices are serious offenses subject to disciplinary action and/or criminal charges. The Norton Fire Department reserves the right to issue a $500 charge for responding to malicious false alarms. This charge will be assessed to the responsible parties or to the residents of the hall involved. Students found in possession of/or setting off fireworks or other incendiary devices are subject to a $100 fine and other possible disciplinary action by the college.
  • Any resident who fails to evacuate a residence hall immediately after a fire alarm or refuses to cooperate with hall staff members and/or Campus Safety/Fire personnel, is subject to disciplinary action and may be suspended or removed from the residence hall.
  • The storage of athletic equipment, bags, furniture, motor bikes, bicycles, automotive equipment, and other personal items in corridors and stairwells of College buildings and residence halls is prohibited.
Guest Policy

Students residing in Wheaton College residence halls are expected to follow all policies regarding guests as outlined in the Guest Policy. Any student that hosts a person on campus is responsible for their guest(s), the actions of their guest(s), and ensuring that their guest knows and adheres to Wheaton College Honor Code and Community Standards.

Harming Behavior
  • Acts of Violence: Any physical conduct directed toward another that causes physical harm to the targeted individual or group.
  • Endangering the Well-Being of Another: Any conduct, reckless or intentional, that jeopardizes the physical or emotional well-being of another person.
  • Threats of Violence: Any language or conduct that could be reasonably interpreted as an effort to intimidate or threaten another.
  • Harassment Based on a Protected Class: Unwelcome verbal, written, or physical conduct based on a protected classification (race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, marital status, handicap or disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, or any other legally protected classification) that has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or education (including living conditions, extracurricular activities, and social life); creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment; or constituting a threat to an individual’s personal safety. 
  • Harassment Other Than That of a Protected Class: Unwelcome behaviors that are persistent or repetitive and create an unreasonably uncomfortable educational, work, or living environment for an individual, or unreasonably interfere with an individual’s academic or job performance and opportunities.

Please note that not every act that might be offensive to an individual or a group necessarily will be considered a violation of Community Standards. Alleged acts of sexual or gender-based harassment will be addressed through the Sexual and Gender-based Misconduct Policies.

Hazing

All students are expected to abide by the College’s Hazing Policy.

Hygienic living and learning environment.

Any conduct that fails to maintain a hygienic living and learning environment.

Invasion of Privacy

Any attempt or actual invasion of a person’s reasonable right to privacy.  This includes but is not limited to any attempted use or actual use of electronic devices that invade a person’s privacy.  This also includes the audio recording of another person without their consent.

Lewd Conduct

Any conduct that is lewd, indecent, or disorderly, including but not limited to public urination, public defecation, streaking, stripping, solicitation of a stripper, and/or participation in acts of a sexual nature publicly or in the presence of others that do not meet established harassment thresholds under the Sexual and Gender-based Misconduct Policies.

Residential Life Policies

Any student residing in Wheaton College residence halls must follow all policies and procedures outlined in the Residential Living Handbook and Residential Life Policies webpage as well as in the Housing Contract. Additionally, students who agree to live in specialty housing such as Living Learning Communities are also subject to the policies of those communities, such as abstaining from substances in substance-free areas.

Retaliation

Any acts or words that constitute intimidation, threats, or coercion because of that person’s: (1) report of misconduct; (2) assistance in reporting of misconduct; (3) participation in any proceeding under the Student Conduct Process; or (4) protest of misconduct, and that would also deter a reasonable person from reporting or assisting in reporting misconduct, participating in any proceeding under the Student Conduct Process, or protesting of misconduct. Retaliation does not include minor annoyances or another’s lack of good manners as those actions will not deter a reasonable person from engaging in the process.

Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct

Students are expected to abide by the Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies. Alleged violations of either Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policy are addressed by a process separate from the Student Conduct Process and can be found in the Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies.

Smoking and Vaping

Smoking or Vaping of any substance is prohibited in and within 25 feet of all College buildings and facilities, including all campus residence halls and houses. This includes, but is not limited to, the use of bongs, hookahs, pipes, electronic cigarettes, and vaporizers.

Theft

Theft, which includes but is not limited to, attempted or actual theft or unauthorized use or possession of property, resources, or services.

Trademark

Unauthorized use (including misuse) of College name and trademarks in association with any work, regardless of the ownership of the work.

Unauthorized Use or Entry
  • The unauthorized use or access of any College property including but not limited to vehicles, office equipment, letterhead, college seal, and campus facilities without permission from a College official is prohibited.
  • The unauthorized entry, use or occupancy of College facilities is prohibited. The unauthorized use or misuse of furniture is prohibited.
  • Tampering with locks to College buildings, unauthorized possession or use of College keys or keycards, and alteration or duplication of College keys and/or keycards is prohibited.
  • Misuse of access privileges to College premises or unauthorized entry to or use of, not limited to roofs, fire escapes, balconies, or windows.
Violations of Law

Evidence of violation of local, state, or federal laws, when substantiated through the College’s Student Conduct Process.

Weapons

No individual may possess, carry, store, use, or have in their custody or control, a firearm or other weapon anywhere on the campus grounds, in any campus building, or at any College-sponsored event. This policy includes, but is not limited to, firearms of any nature including: shotguns, rifles, pistols and revolvers, paintball guns, or BB/pellet guns; firearm replicas; ammunition; martial arts-type weapons; explosives (including fireworks); bows, crossbows, arrows; slingshots; switchblade knives, double-edged knives, hunting (fixed-blade)-style knives of any length, throwing knives, or folding (pocket-style) knives with a blade length of four inches or greater; swords; axes; mace, pepper gas/spray, and other dangerous chemicals; or any other destructive device or instrument that may be used to do bodily injury or damage to property.

VI. STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS

This section outlines how the College will address reports of misconduct that could constitute a violation of the Honor Code and/or Community Standards and determine what, if any, interim measures and/or sanctions are appropriate. 

Reports of sexual and gender-based misconduct are addressed through separate processes outlined in the Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies and do not apply to the conduct processes set forth in this section. 

Alleged violations on Academic Integrity where the student does not have a prior academic violation may be adjudicated by the faculty member following the preponderance of evidence standard.  Students have the same rights and responsibilities as outlined in this policy, including the right to appeal.  For any subsequent alleged violations following the first responsible finding, the reports will be referred to the Student Conduct Process.

1. Reporting an Incident

In an effort to promote a culture of reporting, the College encourages anyone to report potential violations of the Honor Code or Community Standards. Community Members can utilize a number of reporting options which include, but are not limited to:

  1. Community Reporting Options. The Community Reporting Options are available on the InsideWheaton portal for faculty, staff, and students under the Campus Life tab, that allows all members of the community to submit a variety of reports based on different incidents and concerns.
  2. LiveSafe App. The LiveSafe app is available to the Wheaton community and provides a direct reporting line to Campus Safety, allowing community members to anonymously report tips as well as seek help.
  3. Campus Safety. Campus Safety is located at 30 Taunton Avenue and reachable via telephone at 508-286-8213 for non-emergencies or 508-286-3333 for an emergency.
  4. Residential Life Staff. Residential Life is located in the Balfour-Hood Campus Center on the 3rd floor and is reachable via telephone at (508) 286-8214. Each residence hall/residential area consists of a staff of Resident Advisors and a Residential Life Coordinator who can help work through the issues associated with living in a community. All Residential Life Staff are required to report concerns related to the College’s Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies.
  5. Dean of Students Office. The Dean of Students Office is located in Park Hall on the 1st floor, via email at deanofstudents@wheatoncollege.edu, and  via telephone at (508) 286-8218. The Dean of Students Office coordinates student support initiatives.
2. Rights and Responsibilities

All students at Wheaton College have certain rights afforded to them through the Student Conduct Process. These rights include:

  1. To be informed of any alleged violations of the Honor Code or Community Standards;
  2. To inspect a copy of a redacted Campus Safety report or Student Affairs incident report;
  3. To be given the opportunity to respond to the alleged charges within the parameters of this policy;
  4. To request additional accommodations, including, but not limited to the use of technology, etc.;
  5. To provide the names of witnesses with direct knowledge of the incident who may appear at a Conduct Review Meeting or College Hearing Board. Character witnesses are not permitted;
  6. To be informed of the outcome of a student conduct proceeding, and request an appeal of the decision in accordance with the appeal process set forth below.

All students at Wheaton College have certain responsibilities that they are expected to fulfill through the Student Conduct Process. These responsibilities include:

  1. Abide by the Honor Code, and more specifically: act honestly, responsibly, and above all, with honor and integrity.
  2. Be accountable for all that is said or written.
  3. Behave in a manner that demonstrates concern for the personal dignity, rights, and freedoms of all members of the community.
  4. Engage in the Student Conduct Process by preparing for and attending meetings, and sharing as much information as possible to help maximize the educational value of the system for accountability.
3. Student Conduct Procedures

The following procedures are the procedures followed to adjudicate all violations of the Community Standards, except allegations of sexual and gender-based misconduct and allegations of a first violation of academic integrity.

Conduct Officers may involve or seek input from other College Officials in any or all parts of the Student Conduct Process as they deem appropriate.

A. Allegations
  1. Any person may file a report regarding any student or Student Organization alleging misconduct. To initiate the Community Standards Process, reports shall be prepared in writing and directed to the Procedural Coordinator, or a designee, or using any of the methods listed above. A report should be submitted as soon as possible after the alleged misconduct takes place.
  2. The Procedural Coordinator or designee shall determine if a complaint alleges a potential violation of the Community Standards and will notify the respondent of such allegations. The decision to continue a complaint through the Student Conduct Process is the decision of the Procedural Coordinator or designee.
  3. Generally, the Procedural Coordinator or designee will assign a Conduct Officer(s) to the case who will schedule a hearing with the Respondent(s) and other individuals as deemed necessary and appropriate.
  4. The Procedural Coordinator, or designee, will determine what testimony, witnesses, or other information is relevant and may exclude information or witnesses that are deemed immaterial and/or irrelevant.
  5. If additional information or follow-up with the involved parties is required prior to notification of allegations to appropriate Respondents, the Procedural Coordinator, or designee including but not limited to staff in the Dean of Students Office, Residential Life, and Campus Safety, may conduct interviews and collect additional information to support or mitigate a report.
  6. If an incident report involves more than one charged student, or if there is more than one incident involving the same student, the Procedural Coordinator, or designee, in their discretion, may determine whether a Conduct Review Process concerning each incident will be conducted either separately or jointly.
B. Options for Resolution

Educational Conference

  1. The Procedural Coordinator, or designee, reserves the right to schedule an Educational Conference to discuss the behavior of students and its impact on the mission of the College. The Procedural Coordinator or designee will assign a Conduct Officer to hold the Educational Conference. Conferences may result in an action plan agreed on by all parties to address the behavior. If the action plan is not honored, the College reserves the right to initiate a formal review under the Student Conduct Process.
  2. Examples of incidents that may be adjudicated by an Educational Conference include, but are not limited to: minor disruptions and/or educational or behavioral concerns.
  3. Educational Conferences are typically scheduled within ten (10) business days upon receipt of a report of a potential violation of the Community Standards. Students who fail to respond to the request to meet, may be subject to a Conduct Review Meeting with proper notice, to review the allegations and the student’s failure to participate in the Educational Conference.
  4. The student can provide the Conduct Officer with names of witnesses with relevant information, and/or documents or information to be reviewed that pertain to the alleged violation, in advance of the meeting. Other students with whom the College wishes to speak are expected to be truthful and participate as requested. The Conduct Officer may impose limits upon the number of witnesses and the amount of information that may be introduced where the conduct officer determines that the proffered information is cumulative, redundant or immaterial.
  5. Students are permitted to have an advisor accompany them during an Educational Conference. An advisor may not answer on behalf of the student, or otherwise actively participate in the student conduct process. A student should select an advisor whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the meetings. Conferences will not be rescheduled due to schedule conflicts of the advisor.

Adjudication by Letter

  1. The Procedural Coordinator, or designee, shall determine the appropriateness of adjudicating an incident by letter. The Procedural Coordinator or designee will assign a Conduct Officer to the matter. When an incident is to be addressed through an adjudication by letter,  a student shall typically receive an emailed letter from the Conduct Officer outlining the violations, findings of responsibility, and sanctions within five (5) business days from receipt of notification of alleged violation.
  2. Students will have the opportunity to appeal said findings and sanctions within three (3) business days.
  3. If students choose not to appeal the decision communicated by letter, the findings and sanctions will be considered final.
  4. Examples of incidents that may be adjudicated by letter include, but are not limited to minor violations of the Room and Board Agreement and other Residential Life Policies, such as noise and prohibited items.

Conduct Review Meeting

  1. The Procedural Coordinator, or designee will determine whether formal process will be managed by a Conduct Review Meeting or a College Hearing Board Review Meeting.
  2. Conduct Review Meetings are formal meetings between a Respondent and a Conduct Officer to determine if a violation has occurred based on the preponderance of the evidence, and issue the appropriate sanctions(s). The Procedural Coordinator or designee will assign a Conduct Officer to the matter. 
  3. Conduct Review Meetings typically follow the steps outlined below:
    1. Notice to Respondent(s) of alleged charges along with date, time, and location of the Conduct Review Meeting.
    2. The Conduct Review Meeting will be an individual meeting between the Respondent(s) and a Conduct Officer to provide evidence, testimonies, and any relevant information that may be pertinent to the allegations and determine the facts of the incident reported. In certain situations, the Procedural Coordinator will allow for the Conduct Officer to meet with more than one Respondent during the same Conduct Review Meeting.
    3. The Conduct Officer is responsible for providing a summary of the Conduct Review Meeting including a brief statement of the facts, findings from the Conduct Review Meeting (responsible or not responsible), and any sanctions that have been issued.
      1. If a responsible finding is determined, past violations of the Community Standards and/or the Honor Code and any prior  sanctions may be considered in determining current sanctions. The student will be responsible for completing all assigned sanctions, and failure to do so may result in additional student conduct action. 
      2. Additionally, the student(s) will be informed of their right to an appeals process as part of the outcome.
    4. The outcome of the Conduct Review Meeting will be made part of the student’s student conduct record and maintained by the Procedural Coordinator. The complainant, if involved in the process, will be notified of the finding and any sanctions that directly impact their experience at the College.
  4. The purpose of the Conduct Review Meeting is to offer the Respondent an opportunity to inform the College, verbally or through a written statement, of any facts they believe should be considered in determining whether they are responsible for a reported violation and if they are, what sanctions may be appropriate.
  5. If the College requests that the Respondent attend a Conduct Review Meeting and the Respondent does not do so for any reason whatsoever, the College will still proceed to address the situation, and determine if the Respondent is responsible for the reported violation, or a related violation, and confirm the imposition of any appropriate student conduct action in the absence of the Respondent. The Respondent will be notified in writing of the outcome,  any sanctions, and the opportunity to appeal.
  6. Failure to cooperate with the College’s investigation of a reported violation may result in student conduct action, up to and including suspension and expulsion from the College.
  7. The Respondent can provide the Conduct Officer with names of witnesses with relevant information, and/or documents or information to be reviewed that pertain to the alleged violation. This information must be provided to the Conduct Officer more than 48 hours prior to the meeting to allow for review of the information or interviews to take place prior to the Conduct Review Meeting. Other students with whom the College wishes to speak are expected to be truthful and participate as requested. The Conduct Officer may impose limits upon the number of witnesses and the amount of information that may be introduced where the Conduct Officer determines that the proffered information is cumulative, redundant, or immaterial.
  8. Students are permitted to have an advisor accompany them during a Student Conduct Meeting. An advisor may not answer on behalf of the student, or otherwise, actively participate in the student conduct process. A student should select an advisor whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the meetings. Student Conduct Meetings will not be rescheduled due to schedule conflicts of the advisor. 
  9. The person designated as the Conduct Officer may speak with other individuals or review written materials, oral materials or property, as the Conduct Officer deems appropriate, to review the situation and to make a determination of whether the Respondent is responsible for the reported violation, or a related violation. The Conduct Officer will make this information available to the Respondent to be able to respond prior to a decision on the matter.
  10. Information learned during a Conduct Review Meeting or in the course of an investigation may result in the College modifying the reported violation(s) originally presented to the student. In those situations, the College will determine if it is necessary to conduct an additional or follow-up Conduct Review Meeting in order to determine if the Respondent is responsible for the violation(s) as reported originally and as subsequently modified.
  11. For Conduct Review Meetings, involving Student Organizations:
    1. Review of allegations of misconduct of individual student members will be determined under the Community Standards prior to the determination of Student Organization alleged violations.
    2. The Student Organization must designate one representative for the Student Organization by written notice to the Procedural Coordinator or designee within 3 days of being sent notice of alleged violations of the Community Standards. The designated representative will represent the Student Organization during the Student Conduct Process.
    3. The designated representative for the Student Organization is required to notify the advisor of Student Organization of any alleged violations of the Community Standards and any sanctions imposed.

College Hearing Board

  1. The College Hearing Board is a hearing body, with student positions elected by the student body, appointed by the Student Senate, and faculty and staff appointed by the Dean of Students Office, charged with adjudicating alleged misconduct that violates the Community Standards. The College Hearing Board does not hear any allegations of Sexual or Gender-based Misconduct.
  2. A College Hearing Board Review Meeting is a formal meeting between a Respondent and the College Hearing Board to determine if a violation has occurred based on the preponderance of the evidence and issue the appropriate sanctions(s). The Procedural Coordinator or designee will determine whether the formal process will be managed by a Conduct Review Meeting or a College Hearing Board Review Meeting. College Hearing Board Review Meetings typically follow the following steps outlined below:
    1. Notice to Respondent(s) of alleged charges along with the date, time, and location of the College Hearing Board Review Meeting.
    2. The College Hearing Board Review Meeting will be a meeting between the Respondent(s) and the College Hearing Board to provide evidence, testimonies, and any relevant information that may be pertinent to the allegations and determining facts of the incident reported. In certain situations, the Complainant may also participate in the College Hearing Board Review Meeting. If the Complainant chooses to participate, they may either provide a statement to be included in the documents available to the Respondent and the College Hearing Board, or attend the College Hearing Board Review Meeting and answer questions from the Board and the Respondent.
    3. The Chair of the College Hearing Board is responsible for providing a summary of the College Hearing Board Review Meeting to the Procedural Coordinator, including a brief statement of the facts, findings from the College Hearing Board Review Meeting (responsible or not responsible), and any sanctions that have been issued.
      1. If a responsible finding is determined, past violations of the Community Standards and the Honor Code, and any sanctions, may be considered in determining current sanctions. The Respondent will be responsible for completing all assigned sanctions, and failure to do so may result in additional Student Conduct action.
      2. Additionally, the Respondent(s) will be informed of their right to an appeals process as part of the outcome.
    4. The outcome of the College Hearing Board Review Meeting will be communicated to the Respondent by the Procedural Coordinator, or designee and made part of the student’s student conduct record. The Complainant, if involved in the process, will be notified of the finding and any sanctions that directly impact their experience at the College.
  3. The purpose of the College Hearing Board Review Meeting is to offer the Respondent an opportunity to inform the College, verbally or through a written statement, of any facts they believe should be considered in determining whether they are responsible for a reported violation and if they are, what sanctions may be appropriate.
    1. If the College requests that the Respondent attend a College Hearing Board Review Meeting and the Respondent does not do so for any reason whatsoever, the College will still proceed to address the situation, determine if the Respondent is responsible for the reported violation, or a related violation, and confirm the imposition of any appropriate student conduct action in the absence of the Respondent. The Respondent will be notified in writing of the outcome, any sanctions, and the opportunity to appeal.
  4. Failure to cooperate with the College’s investigation of a reported violation may result in student conduct action, up to, and including suspension and expulsion from the College.
  5. The Respondent can provide the Procedural Coordinator, or designee with names of witnesses with relevant information, and/or documents or information to be reviewed that pertain to the alleged violation. This information must be provided to the Procedural Coordinator more than 48 hours prior to the College Hearing Board Review Meeting to allow for review of the information or interviews to take place prior to the College Hearing Board Review Meeting. Other students with whom the College wishes to speak are expected to be truthful and participate as requested. The Procedural Coordinator may impose limits upon the number of witnesses and the amount of information that may be introduced where the Procedural Coordinator determines that the proffered information is cumulative, redundant, or immaterial.
  6. Students are permitted to have an advisor accompany them during a College Hearing Board Review Meeting. An advisor may not answer on behalf of the student, or otherwise actively participate in the student conduct process. They should select a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the meetings. College Hearing Board Review Meetings will not be rescheduled due to schedule conflicts of the advisor. The College Hearing Board has trained student members who are able to serve as a procedural advisor if the involved parties so choose., but a student may select a different advisor of their choosing.
  7. The College Hearing Board may speak with other individuals or review written materials, oral materials, or property, as the Procedural Coordinator deems appropriate, to review the situation and to make a determination of whether the student is responsible for the reported violation, or a related violation. The Procedural Coordinator will make this information available to the Respondent to be able to respond prior to a decision on the matter.
  8. Information learned during a College Hearing Board Review Meeting, or in the course of an investigation may result in the College adding to the reported violation(s) originally presented to the student. In those situations, the College will determine if it is necessary to conduct an additional or follow-up College Hearing Board Review Meeting to determine if the student is responsible for the violation(s) as subsequently modified.
  9. A digital recording will be made of all College Hearing Board Review Meetings for the Board to use in its deliberations and for the Appellate Officer to use in considering any appeal. The deliberations of the Board will not be recorded. The recording of the hearing shall be the property of the College and will be destroyed ten (10) business days after the expiration of the period in which either party may file an appeal or ten (10) business days after the Appellate Officer renders a decision.
C. Determination of Facts Relative to an Alleged Violation

The standard used in determining whether or not the Respondent violated the Community Standards is a preponderance of the evidence: i.e., whether it is more likely than not that a violation occurred.

D. Sanctions
  1. If the Respondent is found responsible for violating the Community Standards, appropriate sanctions will be imposed. Sanctions are determined by considering the nature of the misconduct, precedent regarding such misconduct, the Respondent’s complete educational record (including but not limited to Respondent’s academic transcript and community incident reports and associated information), Respondent’s participation and cooperation through the process, community impact statements, and/or mitigating or aggravating factors.
    • With respect to Respondents that are Student Organizations, Conduct Officers/the College Hearing Board will obtain recommendations from other applicable College departments and offices and may also include a review of the Student Conduct history of individual members of the Student Organization.
  2. Sanctions for violations of the Sexual and Gender-Based Misconduct Policies, are described here. Similarly, violations involving academic integrity issues of the Honor Code are described here.
  3. The College has a special concern for incidents in which persons are mistreated because of race, gender, disability, age, marital status, religion, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, veteran status, genetic information, or other legally protected personal characteristics. Such incidents damage not only individuals, but also the free and open academic environment of the College. More severe sanctions will likely be issued to Respondent(s) who are found responsible for such misconduct.
  4. A campus department, separate from the Dean of Students Office, may place a restriction on a student or Student Organization found responsible for violating the Community Standards. Examples include, but are not limited to: Athletics, Office of Student Activities, Involvement and Leadership (SAIL), Residential Life, and Center for Global Education.
  5. Sanctions such as Dismissal, Suspension, Permanent Residence Hall Suspension or Temporary Residence Hall Suspension may result in the forfeiture of certain monies.
  6. In addition to other mitigating and aggravating factors considered in connection with imposing sanctions, additional factors may be considered with respect to Student Organizations including, but not limited to:
    • The role of leaders and the seniority of the members of the Student Organization involved in the behavior supporting the violation;
    • Whether leaders had knowledge of the misconduct before or while it occurred and failed to take corrective action;
    • The number of members of the Student Organization involved in the behavior supporting the violation and the extent to which members acted in concert in connection with such behavior;
    • Whether the leaders of the Student Organization self-reported the behavior underlying the violation;
    • The extent to which the Student Organization leaders and members cooperated, responded honestly to questions, and accepted responsibility for the behavior underlying the violation;
    • The misconduct involves a violation of the College’s Hazing Policy, Alcohol Policy, Drug Policy, the Sexual and Gender-based Misconduct Policy, the Harming Behavior Policy, or violation of law.
  7. In most cases where sanctions are issued, responsible students will receive a conduct status sanction(s) and educational sanction(s) to reflect the accountability and development aspects of the Student Conduct Process. 
  8. The following sanctions may be imposed, individually or in various combinations, on any Respondent (an individual or Student Organization) found to have violated the Community Standards. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of sanctions.
    • Conduct Status Sanctions:
      • Formal (Written) Warning: A written notice that the Respondent has violated College policy or the Community Standards and a warning that another violation will likely result in more severe sanctions which could include Conduct Probation, Temporary or Permanent Residence Hall Suspension, College Suspension, or College Dismissal or Loss of Recognition with respect to a Student Organization.
      • Housing Probation: Housing Probation is a set period of time during which the Respondent is given the opportunity to modify behavior, to complete specific assignments, meet with designated persons, and demonstrate positive contributions to the Residence Hall community and greater College community in an effort to regain privileges within housing. Please be aware that a responsible finding of any violation will result in further student conduct action being imposed, including, but not limited to: Suspension from the Residence Halls.
      • Conduct Probation: Conduct Probation is a set period of time during which the Respondent or Student Organization is given the opportunity to modify behavior, to complete specific assignments, meet with designated persons, and demonstrate a positive contribution to the College community in an effort to regain privileges within the College community. Please be aware that a responsible finding for any violation(s) of any College policy during the probationary period will be viewed as a violation of probation, and will result in further student conduct action being imposed, including, but not limited to, College Suspension or College Dismissal. Additionally, because students and Student Organizations which are on Conduct Probation are not considered to be in good disciplinary standing with the College, this may impact their ability to participate in intercollegiate athletics, represent the College, hold student leadership positions, participate in study abroad opportunities, and/or participate in extracurricular and/or residential life activities.
      • Suspension from the College, held in Abeyance: Suspension from the College, held in Abeyance is a set period of time during which the Respondent or Student Organization is given the opportunity to modify behavior, to complete specific assignments, meet with designated persons, and demonstrate a positive contribution to the College community in an effort to regain privileges within the College community. Please be aware that a responsible finding for any violation(s) of any College policy during the probationary period will be viewed as a violation of probation, and will result in further student conduct action being imposed, including, but not limited to, College Suspension or College Dismissal. Additionally, as students and Student Organizations which are on Suspension in Abeyance are not considered to be in good disciplinary standing with the College, this may impact their ability to participate in intercollegiate athletics, represent the College, hold student leadership positions, participate in study abroad opportunities, and/or participate in extracurricular and/or residential life activities.
      • College Suspension: College Suspension is a separation from the College for a designated period of time. Students who are suspended from the College are restricted from all College premises and activities, including but not limited to, course registration, class attendance, participation in co-curricular activities and College housing. Students found in violation of this restriction, including attempts to enter the lands or buildings of the College will be subject to immediate arrest for trespassing under M.G.L. c. 266, s. 120, as well as further sanctions from the College. Students who have been separated from the College for a period of time must meet with the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee two weeks prior to the next registration period for which the student is eligible to review any outstanding sanctions and the readmission process. Please be aware that the student’s academic record will be updated to reflect a suspension, including any grade change which may be assigned.
      • College Dismissal: Permanent separation of the student from the College. A student who has been dismissed is prohibited from participating in any College activity or program. The individual may also not be in or on any College premises. Students found in violation of this restriction, including attempts to enter the lands or buildings of the College will be subject to immediate arrest for trespassing under M.G.L. c. 266, s. 120. Please be aware that the student’s academic record will be updated to reflect a dismissal, including any grade change which might be assigned.
      • Residence Hall Suspension: This may be a permanent or temporary separation of the student from the residence halls. Temporary separation of the student from the residence halls for a specific period of time, after which the student may reapply for housing. Reapplication for housing does not guarantee immediate placement. Conditions for returning to the residence halls may be specified.
      • Revocation of Admission or Degree: Admission to the College or an awarded degree from the College may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or another violation of the Community Standards committed during the course of obtaining the degree or for other serious violations committed by a student after admission or prior to graduation.
      • Withholding Degree: The College may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the procedures set forth in the Student Conduct Process, including the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.
      • Loss of Credit or Failure for the Piece of Work: Loss of Credit or Failure in the Course for the Semester in which the Offense Occurred:
    • Educational Sanctions:
      • Assessment: A student may be referred to an appropriate office or local agency for consultation or assessment. These may include Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Assessments and Anger Assessments.
      • Educational Sanction(s) may include educational assignments and projects that encourage further reflection or conversation about the incident and behavior with a focus on decision making and goal setting for the student. This may also include participation in programs or classes (any cost is to be assessed to the student), completion of an alcohol or other drug course such as Alcohol Edu, service to the College or to the larger community, and other assignments as warranted.
    • Other Sanctions:
      • Administrative Housing Relocation: As a result of the Student Conduct Process, the student is required to relocate their residence hall assignment to another residence area as determined by the Office of Residential Life, in consultation with the Dean of Students Office.
      • Removal from an Athletic Team, Campus Organization, or other campus or leadership position for a designated period of time or indefinitely.
      • Restriction: Denial of access to any campus facility, activity, class or program. This includes No Contact Orders.
      • Fines and restitution: A student will be required to pay a fee or compensation for loss, damage, or injury as a result of a violation of the Community Standards. Students not able to pay the fine may complete community service hours.
  9. The following sanctions may be imposed upon any Student Organizations found to have violated the Community Standards. Please note that this is not an exhaustive list of sanctions:
    • Those sanctions listed above.
    • Loss of Recognition: Loss of all College privileges for a designated period of time.
    • Loss of recognition for more than two consecutive semesters requires a Student Organization to reapply for College recognition. Conditions for future recognition may be specified. Students may not continue to participate or associate in a Student Organization or accept further members during any Loss of Recognition.
E. Appeals
    1. A Respondent (an individual or Student Organization) may submit a request for an appeal of an outcome resulting from a Conduct Review Meeting or a College Hearing Board Review Meeting within five (5) business days of receiving written notice of the decision on responsibility or sanctions by submitting an appeal form. This must be filed by 4:30pm on the fifth (5) business day, unless an extension is requested and authorized by the Dean of Students Office.
    2. Content for Appeal. A party may only appeal on the following grounds:
      • Newly discovered material information that was not known to the appellant party during the investigation and during the Conduct Review Meeting/College Hearing Board Review Meeting and which likely would change the finding of responsibility or the sanction imposed had it been available; or
      • Substantial procedural error that materially prejudiced the appellant party. The party submitting the appeal must set forth in detail the grounds for review and must attach all materials that the party wished to have considered in the appeal process.
    3. Appellate Officer. The Appellate Officer will decide the merits of any appeal, and in doing so, may consult with the Conduct Officer, and any other individual that the Appellate Officer deems appropriate. The purpose of the appeal is not to re-hear the case; rather it is to determine if there is sufficient information presented that would require a reconsideration of the decision.
    4. Enforcement of the initial outcome from the Conduct Review Meeting/College Hearing Board Review Meeting: Any action assessed or recommended at the Conduct Review Meeting/College Hearing Board Review Meeting, including Removal or Suspension, may be enforced, in whole or in part, pending the outcome of the appeal at the sole discretion of the Procedural Coordinator.
    5. Appeal Determinations. The Appellate Officer will review the appeal and render a decision within ten (10) business days. The Appellate Officer may:
      • Affirm all or part of the decision (which includes the sanction, as well as the determination of responsibility) of the Conduct Review Meeting/College Hearing Board Review Meeting or,
      • May refer the matter back to the Conduct Review Meeting/College Hearing Board Review Meeting for further consideration. If the matter is referred back, the Appellate Officer will provide specific instructions in the referral. In the event of a referral, the Appellate Officer may mandate such further proceedings as the Appellate Officer deems appropriate under the circumstances, consistent with the Community Standards.
    6. The decision of the Appellate Officer will be provided in writing and is final. All parties to an appeal will receive simultaneous written notice of the outcome of the appeal.
F. Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Wheaton College is committed to providing equal and integrated access for students with disabilities to participate in, and benefit from, all post-secondary education programs and activities, including educational, social, experiential, recreational, and residential. Accessibility Services ensures students with documented disabilities at Wheaton College, as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, receive appropriate accommodations and assistance in order to participate fully in College programs. Rules, policies, or physical space limitations which would inhibit students with disabilities from participating fully in a program or activity may not be imposed. Academic standards should not be compromised, but accommodations must be provided, on a case-by-case basis, to afford qualified students with disabilities an equal educational opportunity. For more information, please contact Accessibility Services (accessibility@wheatoncollege.edu or 508-286-8215).

A student with a documented disability who desires a reasonable accommodation regarding an Educational Conference, Conduct Review Meeting, College Hearing Board Review meeting, or Appeal Meeting must request an accommodation by following the procedure for requesting an accommodation through Accessibility Services. The staff in Accessibility Services will make a determination regarding the request and notify the appropriate parties. Please contact Accessibility Services to obtain further information regarding the registration process.

VII. INTERIM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTION

The Procedural Coordinator, or designee, may impose an interim administrative action on a Respondent during an investigation and prior to a resolution of the Respondent’s alleged violation. Such action may be taken when, based on the information provided and the professional judgment from the College’s Behavioral Intervention Team,  a threat of harm to persons or property exists, or to protect the safety of any person, or the College community as a whole. Examples of interim administrative actions include, but are not limited to: interim suspension from the college, interim removal from housing, interim housing relocation, interim loss of recognition, and/or other necessary restrictions.

An interim administrative action is not a sanction. It is taken in an effort to protect the safety and well-being of the Complainant, Respondent, and other members of the College Community, the College, and/or property. Interim administrative actions are preliminary in nature and are only in effect until an outcome is communicated through the Student Conduct Process, or otherwise communicated by the College. Violations of interim administrative actions may result in additional student conduct action with outcomes up to and including suspension, dismissal, or loss of recognition.

VIII. MAINTENANCE AND REVIEW OF STUDENT CONDUCT FILES

  1. Student conduct files are deemed educational records and are maintained separately from any other academic or official file at the College by the Dean of Students Office. Generally, information from the files is not released without the written consent of the student. However, certain information may be provided without a student’s prior consent to individuals within the College who have a legitimate legal or educational interest in obtaining it, and to individuals outside the College under certain circumstances.
  2. A student conduct file is maintained digitally. A student may have more than one file. Generally, a Conduct File, including related documents, will be kept seven (7) years from the date of the incident. The student conduct file that consists of a suspension or expulsion of a student shall be retained indefinitely.
  3. In situations involving both a Respondent and a student who believes they were a victim of a student’s misconduct, the records of the process, if any, will be considered to be the student conduct records of both the Respondent and the student who believes themselves to be the victim because the educational career and chances of success in the academic community of each may be impacted.
  4. Records of student conduct actions are maintained in the Dean of Students Office in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”).

IX.INTERPRETATION AND REVISION

  1. The Community Standards and Student Conduct Process were most recently approved by the Vice President for Student Affairs in August 2023.
  2. Any questions or interpretation regarding the Community Standards and Student Conduct Process shall be referred to the Procedural Coordinator and the Dean of Students Office for determination. The determination is final.
  3. The Community Standards and Student Conduct Process shall be reviewed annually by the Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee.