Classics
Offered by the Classics department.

Major requirements

The Department of Classics offers five different majors: the interdisciplinary major in Ancient Studies and four major programs in Classics, allowing students to concentrate in either Greek or Latin individually, in the two languages together or in the literatures and cultures of antiquity (Classical Civilization).

Planning worksheets are available for each major concentration.
Classics: Latin and Greek worksheet

Greek or Latin planning worksheet

Classical Civilizational planning worksheet

All four majors require at least nine courses; at least three of these must be at the 300 level or above.  Complementary Classical Civilization courses offered in other departments that count towards the majors in the Classics program include:

ARTH 273 Greek Art and Architecture
ARTH 274 Visualizing Ancient Rome

HIST 343 Late Antiquity: Transformation and Migration
PHIL 203 Ancient Greek Philosophy
REL 110 Literature of the New Testament: The Real Jesus, Ancient and Modern Views

REL 310 New Testament: Acts and Letters

Courses in Classics taken in Junior Year Abroad programs and at other institutions may be counted at the discretion of the department.

The Major in Classics: Latin and Greek combined

Ten courses total.
Five courses in the primary language, at least one of which is at the 300 level.
Three courses in the secondary language, at least one of which is at the 200 level.
Two complementary courses in Classics or Classical Civilization.

 

Minor requirements

The Department of Classics offers three different minors. These minor programs allow students to study either Greek or Latin individually, or the literatures and cultures of antiquity (Classical Civilization). All three minors require at least five courses; at least one of these must be at the 300 level.

Classics minor planning worksheet

The Minor in Latin

Five courses in Latin language, at least one of which is at the 300 level.

The Minor in Greek

Five courses in Greek language, at least one of which is at the 300 level.

The Minor in Classical Civilization

Five courses total.
At least one Classics course at the 300 level.
Complementary courses in Classical Civilization may also count.

Complementary Classical Civilization courses offered in other departments that count towards the minor in Classical Civilization include:
ARTH 273 Greek Art and Architecture
ARTH 274 Visualizing Ancient Rome

HIST 343 Late Antiquity: Transformation and Migration
PHIL 203 Ancient Greek Philosophy
REL 110 Literature of the New Testament: The Real Jesus, Ancient and Modern Views

REL 310 New Testament: Acts and Letters

  • Classics

    CLAS 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Classics

    CLAS 099 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Classics

    CLAS 120 – Greek and Latin Roots in English

    An overview of the historical relation of Greek and Latin to English, and a thorough study of the Greek and Latin elements in English vocabulary. Lectures, exercises, and readings will lead students to expand both their spoken and their recognition vocabularies.

  • Classics

    CLAS 135 – Myth and Folklore

    Mythology and mythography of the Greeks and Romans, focusing on tales of the Trojan War. Comparison with myths of the ancient Near East and other cultures; discussion of what myths are and what they reveal about the societies from which they come.

  • Classics

    CLAS 140 – Before the West

    A study of the influence of ancient Mesopotamian cultures in the Greco-Roman world. Lectures and discussions will examine the historical, economic, literary, artistic and religious ties between Akkad, Persia, ancient Israel and Greece from the Bronze Age to late antiquity and the early Christian era.

  • Classics

    CLAS 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Classics

    CLAS 199 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Classics

    CLAS 205 – The Fall of the Roman Republic

    The history of Rome from 133 B.C.E. to 69 C.E.: the problems of empire, the fall of the Roman Republic, “band-aid” solutions, civil wars and, finally, Augustus and the infamous Julio-Claudians. Emphasis on political, intellectual and social changes.

  • Classics

    CLAS 254 – The Drama of Fifth-Century Athens

    The explosion of political and intellectual energy in Athens in the fifth century and its repercussions, focusing on Greek historical texts (Herodotus and Thucydides) and Greek drama (text, theatre, performance, interpretation). Topics will include the evolution of the Athenian Empire after the Persian War; the interrelationships of politics, religion and the arts; the diverse forms of comedy and tragedy; and the dissolution of Athenian power after the Peloponnesian War. Classics 254 forms a connection with Thea 351.

  • Classics

    CLAS 256 – The Ancient Romance

    Stories of lovers destined to be separated and reunited, of pirates and thieves, false death and miraculous revival, of identity lost and found. From Homer’s Odyssey through Daphnis and Chloe and The Ethiopian Tale to utopian and picaresque literature, Petronius’ Satyricon and the historical fantasy The Romance of Alexander the Great.

  • Classics

    CLAS 258 – Tales of Troy

    A thorough investigation of the stories concerning the destruction of Troy and the end of the age of heroes, through epic (lliad, Odyssey, Aeneid), drama (Helen, Trojan Women), late classical and medieval tales and modern retellings and adaptations.

  • Classics

    CLAS 262 – The Ancient Landscape: From Mythology to Ecology

    The land outside the walls of the city: how it was used and abused, praised and feared, personified in myth and religion. Topics will include agriculture and ancient farming manuals, deforestation, the cult of streams and fountains, the divinities of the wild, the Eleusinian mysteries and the literature that idealizes the country life.

  • Classics

    CLAS 266 – Gender, Power and the Gods

    An introduction to the study of the public and private lives of women in Mediterranean antiquity from classical Athens and Rome to late antiquity (fifth century B.C.E. to fourth century C.E.). The relationship of secular authority to religious custom in the Greco-Roman city-states and empires, and the social status of women within these cultures as understood (and misunderstood) by civic institutions and religious customs, including medicine, law, mythology, art and politics. Special attention to religious practices that allowed women more visible and powerful social identities, including state festivals, the so-called mystery cults, and the emerging Rabbinic (Jewish) and Christian traditions.

  • Classics

    CLAS 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Classics

    CLAS 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Classics

    CLAS 305 – The Fall of the Roman Republic

    (See Classics 205/305 – The Fall of the Roman Republic (CLAS 205). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 354 – The Drama of Fifth-Century Athens

    (See Classics 254/354 – The Drama of Fifth-Century Athens (CLAS 254). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 356 – The Ancient Romance

    (See Classics 256/356 – The Ancient Romance (CLAS 256). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 358 – Tales of Troy

    (See Classics 258/358 – Tales of Troy (CLAS 258). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 362 – The Ancient Landscape: From Mythology to Ecology

    (See Classics 262/362 – The Ancient Landscape: From Mythology to Ecology (CLAS 262). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 366 – Gender, Power and the Gods

    (See Classics 266/366 – Gender, Power and the Gods (CLAS 266). Students at the 300 level will do extra reading, writing and research in projects directed by the instructor.)

  • Classics

    CLAS 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Classics

    CLAS 399 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Classics

    CLAS 401 – Senior Seminar

    Intensive research for majors meeting with faculty on a weekly basis.

  • Classics

    CLAS 499 – Independent Research

    An opportunity to do independent research work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Classics

    CLAS 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

Nancy Evans

Associate Professor of Classics; Chair, Classics and Program Coordinator of Ancient Studies, Greek & Latin

Joel C. Relihan

Professor of Classics