Join us on Thursdays during Postcards from the Pandemic for virtual Q&As, conversations and reflection with exhibition participants.

Register here.

Ebony Williams ’08 believes the link, the thread, the piece of yarn, that connects her life work is her belief in process. While it’s common that human beings spend much of our time focused on the problem and the solution to obstacles that arise from living, the middle part, the journey we go through to reach our desired end point is where we learn the most. It is where we are presented with the most opportunities to grow and experience our humanity, but it is also where we spend the least amount of time reflecting. In this talk Williams’ discusses the focus of her work, creating opportunities for individuals to indulge in the luxury of their process in order to heal. Registration is required for this Zoom event.

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Composer and pianist Courtney Bryan discusses her recent works, including “Yet Unheard,” a work for orchestra and chorus which commemorates Sandra Bland’s tragic death in police custody in 2013. Bryan, a New Orleans native, is Assistant Professor of Music at Tulane, and has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Herb Alpert Award in the Arts and the Samuel Barber Rome Prize in Music Composition. Registration is required for this Zoom event.

Register here.

Felia K. Davenport, associate professor of theatre at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, presents her documentary short film Through the Native Lens, addressing personal identity and its intersection with social identity, cultural appropriation and community. Registration is required for this Zoom event.

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Patrisse Cullors is an internationally recognized artist, activist, and advocate for civil rights and social justice. In 2013, she and two fellow organizers—Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi—created what they described as a “Black-centered political will and movement building project.” They called it #BlackLivesMatter. Although many people know it only as a social media hashtag, it is far more than that. Cullors will discuss the art and activism behind, beyond and of the BLM hashtag, and take questions from moderators and attendees.

Register on Zoom here.

Angie Mazakis’s first book, I Was Waiting to See What You Would Do First, describes the various experiences of a first-generation immigrant. Her work has been widely published, including in The New Republic and Boston Review.

Register on Zoom here.

Join us on Thursdays during Postcards from the Pandemic for virtual Q&As, conversations and reflection with exhibition participants.

Register here.

Join interdisciplinary visual artist April Bey as she shares how her practices and materials explore an introspective and social critique of American and Bahamian culture, contemporary pop culture, feminism, generational theory, social media, AfroFuturism, AfroSurrealism, post-colonialism and constructs of race within white supremacist systems. A brief Q&A will follow Bey’s talk. Registration is required for this Zoom event.

Register on Zoom here.

Join us on Thursdays during Postcards from the Pandemic for virtual Q&As, conversations and reflection with author Maria Baker and artist Yikui (Coy) Gu exhibition participants.

Register here.

Playwright Joyce Van Dyke, director Judy Braha, and actor Elaine Vaan Hogue talk about their collaboration on a new one-woman play featuring suffragist and abolitionist Julia Ward Howe, who asks, “What does it do to your soul if you don’t have representation?” The play is a fever dream and a call to action by Howe, who was a playwright, poet, and founder of the American Woman Suffrage Association which supported voting rights for Black women as well as white women. The conversation will draw parallels between Howe’s mission and today’s election.

Register on Zoom here.