Tommy “Teebs” Pico describes himself as a poet (he guesses), a screenwriter (or whatever), a co-host of a dumb podcast for jerks, and begrudgingly as a performer. His books, IRL, Nature Poem, Junkand Feedhave received numerous accolades including the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, a Lambda Literary Award, an American Book Award and the prestigious Whiting Award.

Wheaton alumna Sandra Yannone’s poetry amplifies the split-second when the everyday turns into catastrophe; the moment of impact when knowing and unknowing collide; the fusion of before and after. And the aftermaths. All constellate here in Yannone’s first full-length collection, Boats for Women, to orient us toward that “choice/to turn toward a sacred face, a turn/toward your own longing to live.”

Emily Morse, Artistic Director of New Dramatists (NYC), engages in a conversation with Professors Charlotte Meehan and Stephanie Burlington Daniels about her work supporting contemporary playwrights and collaborating on ensemble-made theatre in her own practice as playwright, dramaturg, and performer. New Dramatists has been a major force in the development of US-based playwrights since 1949.

Seniors graduating with a degree in creative writing and literature showcase original works of poetry, fiction and dramatic writing.

Ten 10-minute plays—written, directed and performed by Wheaton students—will be showcased.

Longer form plays—written, directed, and performed by Wheaton students—will be showcased at our annual festival. (The original date for this event was March 2)

Author and editor Kathryn Kulpa, winner of the Vella Chapbook Contest for her flash fiction chapbook Girls on Filmand the Mid-List Press First Series Award for her short story collection Pleasant Drugs, is also the author of Who’s the Skirt?, a micro-chapbook published by the Origami Poems Project. Kupla, whose work has also been featured in anthologies and literary magazines will read from her recent work.

Longer form plays—written, directed, and performed by Wheaton students—will be showcased at our annual festival. (The original date for this event was March 2)

As part of the Wheaton Institute for the Interdisciplinary Humanities’ symposium on Narrative Medicine and the Healing Arts, guest co-host, Haas Visiting Artist and poet Sarah Gambito and Performance Artist Robbie McCauley read from their works. Professor Gambito, director of Fordham University’s MFA creative writing program, brings a poet’s mind to psychic, emotional, and physical healing. Emerson College Professor Emerita Robbie McCauley uses methodologies of theatre and storytelling to address charged issues of race and to frame the personal through the large.

Longer form plays—written, directed, and performed by Wheaton students—will be showcased over one weekend at our annual festival.