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  • Explaining Mansplaining

    Assoc. Prof. John Partridge, Philosophy presents the next Lunch Talk on the harms of “mansplaining” as a “pre-emptive testimonial injustice” that objectifies and silences women. Please join us on Tues., Oct. 18 at 12:30 pm in PDR I&II. All are welcome!

    In this presentation, Professor Partridge will examine Rebecca Solnit’s rich description (in the short essay, “Men Explain Things to Me”) of an experience that was later dubbed “mansplaining.” Partridge treats mansplaining as a specific kind of communicative dysfunction in which a man wrongs a woman in her capacity as a knower. Drawing on the work of Miranda Fricker, Partridge will discuss the harms of mansplaining as a “pre-emptive testimonial injustice” that objectifies and silences women. Partridge argues that among other types of bad explainers, who may be merely annoying, the mansplainer’s ignorance reveals him to be an epistemic fraud and credibility thief. Partridge will close by looking to field virtue, epistemology and elsewhere for ways to reduce the frequency and severity of "mansplaining."

    Tuesday, October 18, 2016
    12:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

     

    Presented by John Partridge, Associate Professor of Philosophy

  • The politics of the headscarf in the United States

    Aubrey Westfall, Assist. Prof., Pol. Sc., focuses her talk on the political behavior and membership of Muslim-American women and their implications for the American demos. Tues., Oct. 4th at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    Unlike many other developed countries, the United States has never experienced its own “headscarf affair.” Nevertheless, the subject of Muslim head covering is highly politicized: The United States' permissive legal structure allows the headscarf to function as a symbolic boundary marker, but the discriminatory social environment threatens to calcify the boundary and divide society. This project develops its central argument through the examination of survey data from nearly 2,000 Muslim-American women in 49 states, and rich qualitative data from 17 focus group interviews with 72 women in seven American cities with large Muslim populations. The presentation will focus on the political behavior and membership of Muslim-American women and their implications for the American demos.

    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    Tuesday, October 4, 2016
    PDR I & II

    Presented by Aubrey Westfall, Assistant Professor of Political Science.

  • Just where does local food live? Assessing farmers' markets in the United States

    Justin Schupp, Assistant Professor of Sociology presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    Participation in the local food movement has grown dramatically in the United States, with the farmers’ market being one of its most widespread and heavily promoted forums. Proponents argue that the interactions and transactions that occur at farmers’ markets benefit market participants, but, more importantly, have broader benefits for the neighborhoods they are located in and for society itself. The promise of these benefits raises several important questions, notably: where are farmers’ markets located and who has access to them? Using data from the USDA and US Census, this work explores the location of farmers’ markets areas across several geographic measurements, including at the national, census division, and census tract levels. Results reveal the following: 1) Perhaps not being as white of a movement as critics have suggested, farmers’ markets are almost exclusively a middle to middle-upper class phenomenon; and 2) Farmers’ markets are very unlikely to be found in neighborhoods with lower than average socio-economic statuses indicators, in specific divisions of the US, and in rural areas.

    Please join us for the next Faculty Lunch Talk presented by Justin Schupp, Assistant Professor of Sociology:

    Wednesday, September 28th
    12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

  • Building Community Together Workshop

    Please mark your calendars for a diversity workshop scheduled for Thursday, August 25, 2016, 8:30 am to 4:00 pm in Emerson Dining. A reception will follow at 4:00 pm. Read more…

    workshop-evite and rsvp

  • New Provost

    Wheaton College President Dennis M. Hanno announced that Renée T. White, a distinguished administrator as well as a scholar on race, gender and social inequality, has been appointed Provost following an intensive national search.

  • May 2016 Faculty Workshop Week

    Announcing the annual May Faculty Workshop and schedule for 2016. Please click here for a list of all faculty workshops scheduled for the week of 5/23 – 5/27/16.

    Click to download :  MAY 2016 FACULTY WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

    Monday, May 23, 2016:

    • Curriculum Review All Faculty Workshop ( Full-Day )

      Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
      Location: Hindle Auditorium
      Contact: Scott Gelber
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am — Hindle Lobby.
      Lunch provided — SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    • All faculty reception will follow workshop.

      Time: 4:00 pm
      Location: SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016:

    • Foreign Languages Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day)

    Time: 9:00 am
    Location: Language Lab, Meneely
    Contact: Nancy Evans
    Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

    • LIS Workshop on Information Literacy (Afternoon: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Greenaway Room, Library
      Contact: Sue Wawrzaszek
      Refreshments provided.

    Description: In 2016, the Association of College and Research Libraries adopted the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, a set of core concepts that provide a dynamic and flexible frame for information literacy instruction. In this interactive workshop, we will explore the six core concepts and related practices and dispositions set out by the Framework and consider how they can be applied at Wheaton to cultivate a community of self-sufficient lifelong learners. 

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016:

    • Market Research Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 10:30 am
      Location: Meneely 102
      Coffee and refreshments provided. 

    Description: Gene Begin, Vice President for Marketing and Communication, will lead a discussion on the College's prospective students' market research, introduce our brand strategy partner Minelli, Inc., and solicit insight and feedback for the brand discovery project.

    • Safe Zone Training (Afternoon: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Meneely 105
      Contact: Lexy Halpern and Tai Feaster
      Refreshments provided.

    Thursday, May 26, 2016:

    • FYS Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: SC B234
      Contact: Shawn Christian
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.
      Lunch provided — SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    • Neuroscience Departmental Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: SC1313
      Contact: Rolf Nelson
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

    • Public Health Program Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:30 am
      Location: Meneely 102
      Contact: Michael Berg
      Coffee and pastries from 9:00-9:30 am.

    • HHM1 Faculty Workshop (1/2 day afternoon)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Greenaway Room, Library
      Contact: Meg Kirkpatrick
      Refreshments provided.

    Friday, May 27, 2016

    • CORE Advising Faculty Workshop (1/2 day morning)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: Meneely 301
      Contact: Jocelyn Emerson
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

  • From monsters to mothers and multiculturalism: social education billboards and murals in Ethiopia

    Leah Niederstadt, Assist. Prof. of Museum Studies explores ways in which age, class, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, and HIV/AIDS status have been visually represented in Ethiopian billboards and murals over the past 16 years. All are welcome to attend on Wed., April 27th at 12:30-1:30 pm in PDR.

    Anyone traveling Ethiopia’s main roads is certain to see billboards promoting a variety of businesses, products, or services. As in many other countries, in addition to commercial advertising, Ethiopian billboards and murals are used for social education. In 2000, I began documenting the economic, health, and social issues that appear on billboards and murals throughout the country. This Faculty Lunch Talk explores the ways in which age, class, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, and HIV/AIDS status have been visually represented in Ethiopian billboards and murals over the past 16 years. I examine the recent shift from a focus on HIV/AIDS education towards one promoting the rights of children, women, and people with disabilities; and I consider how urban development affects this ubiquitous means of public education.

    Presented by Leah Niederstadt, Assistant Professor of Museum Studies on:

    Wednesday, April 27th
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

    All are welcome to attend!

     

     

     

  • Collaborating to understand marital rape

    Gabriela Torres, Assoc. Prof., Anthropology and Kersti Yllö, Prof. of Sociology look at how interdisciplinary partnerships enable the examination of how cultural, legal, public health, and human rights policies and practices impact intimate partner violence. Tues., April 19, 2016 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    Collaboration in teaching at Wheaton College yields new insight in scholarship. Such is the case with the volume "Marital Rape" published by Professor's Yllö and Torres. This presentation is in part a narrative of the findings in the co-edited volume and a narrative of the fruitfulness of collaboration across disciplinary boundaries. Putting together the insight of scholarship in anthropology, sociology and feminist activism the presentation will demonstrate on how interdisciplinary partnerships enable the examination of how cultural, legal, public health, and human rights policies and practices impact intimate partner violence.

    Presented by Gabriela Torres, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Kersti Yllö, Professor of Sociology

    Tuesday, April 19th
    12:30 p.m. - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

     

     

  • A decade of collaboration in the theatre

    Presented by Charlotte Meehan, Professor of English, and Stephanie Daniels, Associate Professor of Theatre on Thursday, April 14, 2016 from 12:30 to 1:30 pm in PDR. Read more>>>

    With a special emphasis on Charlotte Meehan's multimedia hootenanny-in-progress, Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: A User's Guide (timed to open in September just before this mad election), the two theatre artists will talk about their collaborations dating back to 2005 when Daniels directed a mainstage production of Meehan's SpellSong. That began a decade of continued work together with projects ranging from Looking for George, a multimedia plea to then President G.W. Bush to end the war in Iraq, to 27 Tips for Banishing the Blues (featured in the attached poster).

    We have lots to tell you about our activities in socially progressive experimental theatre, especially since the re-launch of Sleeping Weazel in Boston, and hope you will join the conversation. Please join Charlotte Meehan, Professor of English, and Stephanie Daniels, Associate Professor of Theatre for the next faculty lunch talk on:

    Thursday, April 14th
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Writing across, in and through the disciplines: what the research reveals

    Presented by Lisa Lebduska, Professor of English on Wednesday, April 6th at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    The writer Donald Murray once observed that "writing may appear magic, but it is [teachers'] responsibility to take our students backstage to watch the pigeons being tucked up in the magician's sleeve." But what does he mean by that, and, how do we do it? Luckily, writing studies (also known as "composition and rhetoric") has devoted over a century to debating and studying answers to these rich and perpetual questions. Come backstage with me, and we'll explore some of the most recent research and how it translates into everyday classroom practices for all disciplines and all levels.

    Presented by Lisa Lebduska, Professor of English

    Date: Wednesday, April 6th
    Time: 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
    Place: President's Dining Room

    All are welcome to attend!