Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Office of the Provost

News

  • May Workshop Week Announcement

    May Workshops are scheduled from Monday, May 22nd through Friday, May 26, 2017. Read all about it>>>

    The annual May Workshop Week is scheduled for May 22-May 26, 2017. Click here for full details of May Workshop Schedule with descriptions.


    A summary view of all workshops is provided below:

    Monday, May, 2017

    • Title: 9 Weird Tricks the Government and Mainstream Media Won’t Tell You About that Librarians Use to Teach Wheaton Students to Evaluate Evidence! What They Do Will Blow Your Mind!
      Facilitator: Cary Gouldin
      Time: 9:00 - 12:00 pm
      Location: Greenaway Rm., Library
    • Title: Women’s and Gender Studies
      Facilitator: Kim Miller
      Time: 9 - 12:00
      Location: New Yellow Parlor
    • Title: Writing Across the Curriculum
      Facilitator: Lisa Lebduska
      Time: 12:30 - 2:30 pm
      Location: Meneely 102
    • Title: CORE
      Facilitator: Jocelyn Emerson
      Time: 1:00 - 3:00 pm
      Location: Meneely 301

    Tuesday, May 23, 2017

    • Title: “But What if Someone Needs it?”: The Future of Library Collections at Wallace Library
      Facilitator: Lauren Slingluff
      Time: 9:00 - 12:00 pm
      Location: Scholar's Lab
    • Title: Department Chairs Workshop
      Facilitator: Meg Kirkpatrick and Shawn Christian
      Time: 9:00 - 12:00 pm
      Location: Meneely 301
    • Title: AAUP
      Facilitator: Karen McCormack
      Time: 12:00 - 1:30 pm
      Location: May Room
    • Title: Curriculum Review Workshop
      Facilitator: CR Steering Committee
      Time: 2:00 - 3:30 pm (Discussion)
      Location: Hindle Auditorium
      Time: 3:30 - 4:30 (Reception)
      Location: Science Center Patio (rain location: Davis Café)

    Wednesday, May 24, 2017

    • Title: Student Success Summit
      Facilitator: Cindy Kane
      Time: 8:30 - 4:30 pm
      Location: Filene Center
      Lunch: Emerson Dining Room

    Thursday, May 25, 2017

    • Title: First Year Seminar
      Facilitator: Shawn Christian
      Time: 9:00 - 1:00 pm
      Location: SC MARS 1141
      Lunch: Davis Café
    • Title: Access, Diversity, and Inclusion in Higher Education (for staff but open to faculty)
      Facilitated by: POSSE Foundation
      Time: 1:00 - 4:00 pm
      Location: Faculty Dining Room
      RSVP to: deanofstudents@wheatoncollege.edu

    Friday, May 26, 2017 

    • Title: Neuroscience
      Facilitator: Rolf Nelson
      Time: 9:00 - 12:00
      Location: SC MARS 1120
    • Title: Authentic Dialogues
      Facilitator: POSSE Foundation
      Time: 9:00 - 12:00
      Location: Faculty Dining Room
      RSVP to: morrissey_bernice@wheatoncollege.edu

    End of workshops

    Please contact Associate Provost Shawn Christian for additional information.

  • Community Conversation: Democratic Decline or Republican Resilience?

    Please join the Political Science dept. on Thurs., April 27th at 5:00 pm in Cole Chapel basement for the next community conversation.

    Is the United States now a flawed democracy? Some organizations that track key characteristics of democratic systems think it might be. Have we really lost our way, no longer following the central tenets of a democratic system, or are political institutions operating as they should be? Join the political science department as we consider what has changed in our contemporary political climate and what we think the biggest challenges of our time might be.

    Please join us!

    Thursday, April 27th
    5:00 p.m.
    Chapel Basement

    Community Conversation Series: A Faculty-Led Discussion Series

  • Finding Mrs. Newell: An Ancient Legacy for the Liberal Arts

    Presented by Leah Niederstadt, Assistant Prof. of Museum Studies and Curator of the Permanent Collection on Tues., April 18th at 12:30 pm, PDR. Read more here>>>

    In October 1966, Wheaton received notification of the largest gift of artwork the college has ever received: a bequest of antiquities from Adra Marshall Newell. Until recently, however, little was known about Mrs. Newell, who had only a minor connection to Wheaton. She was usually identified as "just a wife" to her husband Edward T. Newell, who led the American Numismatic Society (ANS) until his death in 1941. Although Mrs. Newell served as her husband’s executor and honorary curator of his collection until her death, ANS officials deemed the bulk of her papers irrelevant and destroyed them, which helps explain why no photograph of her was known to exist.

    Yet, Newell's legacy at Wheaton is unquestionable. Her gift prompted formation of what is now the Permanent Collection; and when ancient glass from the bequest was deaccessioned and sold at auction in 1978, the proceeds formed an endowment that has since been used to acquire nearly a dozen objects including the 15th-century DuBourg Book of Hours. Hundreds of students have used Newell’s donation for assignments ranging from semester-long research projects to student-curated exhibitions.

    This talk examines the Newell bequest as an example of ethical deaccessioning from an academic collection and considers the legacy a single woman's generosity can make to the liberal arts.

    Presented by Leah Niederstadt, Assistant Professor of Museum Studies and Curator of the Permanent Collection

    Tuesday, April 18th
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

     

  • The shipping revolution and its implications: why the old manufacturing jobs are not coming back

    Russell Williams, Assoc. Prof., Econ. will discuss key changes in technology that are shaping this trade. Thurs., April 13th, 12:30 pm in PDR.

    International trade and the decline in manufacturing jobs were among the topics referred to in the last election. But, how well do we understand the underlying dynamics? Ninety percent of international trade is done through ships.

    Russell Williams, Associate Professor of Economics will discuss three key changes in technology that are shaping the shipping trade.

    Thursday, April 13, 2017
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

     All are welcome to attend.

     

  • Incorporating the Elisabeth Amen Nursery School Into Your Curriculum

    Presented by Marge Werner, Dir., Elisabeth Amen Nursery School, Thurs., April 6th -12:30 p.m. in PDR.

    Marge Werner, Director of the Elisabeth Amen Nursery School presents a talk for faculty to consider how to use the Nursery School to enhance learning experiences for students in their classes. All are invited to share in the discussion at the next Faculty Lunch Talk.

    Thursday, April 6th
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

     

  • Community Conversations: What We Know About State Violence

    All are welcome and encouraged to attend. Thurs., March 30th at 5:00 pm – Chapel Basement Read more>>>

    In conflicts, genocides and civil wars across the globe we have learned that state violence changes societies, institutions and persons. How can we better understand mass incarceration, police violence, and stop-and-frisk programs and the like by leveraging what we know about state violence in global context? Join Professors Torres, Kim and de Alba to think through state violence from a global perspective.

    Thursday, March 30th
    5:00 p.m.
    Chapel Basement

    All are welcome and encouraged to attend. Please contact the Provost's Office for additional information about the Community Conversation series.

  • The Slow Professor Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

    Presented and facilitated by Nancy Kendrick, Lisa Lebduska, Karen McCormack, and Dana Polanichka. Please join the discussion! Tues., March 28th at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    A presentation of Barbara Seeber and Maggie Berg’s thought-provoking book, followed by an open discussion about Wheaton’s own culture.
    Presented and facilitated by Nancy Kendrick, Lisa Lebduska, Karen McCormack, and Dana Polanichka.

    Tuesday, March 28th
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

    All are welcome to attend.

  • "The Tomb in which my Body will be Buried," The Text through which my Soul will be Saved

    Presented by Dana Polanichka, Assoc. Prof., History on Thur., March 23, 2017 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    In the 841 CE, a Frankish noblewoman named Dhuoda found herself abandoned by her husband and separated from her two sons. In desperation, she drafted a lengthy handbook of advice to her absent sons. This talk explores that remarkable text, focusing on the challenge of disentangling sin from illness in the early medieval world.

    Presented by Dana Polanichka, Associate Professor of History.  All are welcome to attend.

    Thursday, March 23rd
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

     

  • Eisenstein's Excellent Mexican Adventure: ¡Que viva México!

    The artistic product of three countries, ¡Que viva México! is Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein’s oddest and least-known film. It is an episodic, anthropological and political journey through the culture of Mexico. After miles of film shot on location in 1931, it almost didn’t see the light of day. Presented by Francoise Rosset, Associate Professor of […]

    The artistic product of three countries, ¡Que viva México! is Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein's oddest and least-known film. It is an episodic, anthropological and political journey through the culture of Mexico. After miles of film shot on location in 1931, it almost didn't see the light of day.

    Presented by Francoise Rosset, Associate Professor of Russian.

    Tuesday, February 28th
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

    For a listing of all Spring 2017 semester Faculty Lunch Talks, click on the following link: Faculty Lunch Talks 2017

  • The Philosophy of Immigration and the Problem of Statelessness

    Presented by Stephen Mathis, Assoc. Professor of Philosophy – Thurs., March 9th in PDR. Read more>>>

    Many political philosophers defend the right of nations to control their own immigration policies and to decide who can be a citizen and who cannot. Certain forms of statelessness, however, seem to pose problems for this view: in nations without birthright citizenship, for example, some children end up born stateless. Though these nations may have a right to control their own immigration policies and requirements for citizenship, they do not have the right to harm non-citizens for no good reason, and rendering someone stateless is a particularly severe harm.

    Presented by Stephen Mathis, Associate Professor of Philosophy

    Please join us:

    Thursday, March 9, 2017
    12:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

    Click here for the Faculty Lunch Talk Spring schedule: Faculty Lunch Talks Spring 2017