Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Office of the Provost

News

  • May 2016 Faculty Workshop Week

    Announcing the annual May Faculty Workshop and schedule for 2016. Please click here for a list of all faculty workshops scheduled for the week of 5/23 – 5/27/16.

    Click to download :  MAY 2016 FACULTY WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

    Monday, May 23, 2016:

    • Curriculum Review All Faculty Workshop ( Full-Day )

      Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
      Location: Hindle Auditorium
      Contact: Scott Gelber
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am — Hindle Lobby.
      Lunch provided — SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    • All faculty reception will follow workshop.

      Time: 4:00 pm
      Location: SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016:

    • Foreign Languages Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day)

    Time: 9:00 am
    Location: Language Lab, Meneely
    Contact: Nancy Evans
    Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

    • LIS Workshop on Information Literacy (Afternoon: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Greenaway Room, Library
      Contact: Sue Wawrzaszek
      Refreshments provided.

    Description: In 2016, the Association of College and Research Libraries adopted the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, a set of core concepts that provide a dynamic and flexible frame for information literacy instruction. In this interactive workshop, we will explore the six core concepts and related practices and dispositions set out by the Framework and consider how they can be applied at Wheaton to cultivate a community of self-sufficient lifelong learners. 

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016:

    • Market Research Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 10:30 am
      Location: Meneely 102
      Coffee and refreshments provided. 

    Description: Gene Begin, Vice President for Marketing and Communication, will lead a discussion on the College's prospective students' market research, introduce our brand strategy partner Minelli, Inc., and solicit insight and feedback for the brand discovery project.

    • Safe Zone Training (Afternoon: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Meneely 105
      Contact: Lexy Halpern and Tai Feaster
      Refreshments provided.

    Thursday, May 26, 2016:

    • FYS Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: SC B234
      Contact: Shawn Christian
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.
      Lunch provided — SC Mars Davis Spencer Café.

    • Neuroscience Departmental Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: SC1313
      Contact: Rolf Nelson
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

    • Public Health Program Workshop (Morning: 1/2 day workshop)

      Time: 9:30 am
      Location: Meneely 102
      Contact: Michael Berg
      Coffee and pastries from 9:00-9:30 am.

    • HHM1 Faculty Workshop (1/2 day afternoon)

      Time: 1:00 pm
      Location: Greenaway Room, Library
      Contact: Meg Kirkpatrick
      Refreshments provided.

    Friday, May 27, 2016

    • CORE Advising Faculty Workshop (1/2 day morning)

      Time: 9:00 am
      Location: Meneely 301
      Contact: Jocelyn Emerson
      Coffee and pastries from 8:30-9:00 am.

  • From monsters to mothers and multiculturalism: social education billboards and murals in Ethiopia

    Leah Niederstadt, Assist. Prof. of Museum Studies explores ways in which age, class, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, and HIV/AIDS status have been visually represented in Ethiopian billboards and murals over the past 16 years. All are welcome to attend on Wed., April 27th at 12:30-1:30 pm in PDR.

    Anyone traveling Ethiopia’s main roads is certain to see billboards promoting a variety of businesses, products, or services. As in many other countries, in addition to commercial advertising, Ethiopian billboards and murals are used for social education. In 2000, I began documenting the economic, health, and social issues that appear on billboards and murals throughout the country. This Faculty Lunch Talk explores the ways in which age, class, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, and HIV/AIDS status have been visually represented in Ethiopian billboards and murals over the past 16 years. I examine the recent shift from a focus on HIV/AIDS education towards one promoting the rights of children, women, and people with disabilities; and I consider how urban development affects this ubiquitous means of public education.

    Presented by Leah Niederstadt, Assistant Professor of Museum Studies on:

    Wednesday, April 27th
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

    All are welcome to attend!

     

     

     

  • Collaborating to understand marital rape

    Gabriela Torres, Assoc. Prof., Anthropology and Kersti Yllö, Prof. of Sociology look at how interdisciplinary partnerships enable the examination of how cultural, legal, public health, and human rights policies and practices impact intimate partner violence. Tues., April 19, 2016 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    Collaboration in teaching at Wheaton College yields new insight in scholarship. Such is the case with the volume "Marital Rape" published by Professor's Yllö and Torres. This presentation is in part a narrative of the findings in the co-edited volume and a narrative of the fruitfulness of collaboration across disciplinary boundaries. Putting together the insight of scholarship in anthropology, sociology and feminist activism the presentation will demonstrate on how interdisciplinary partnerships enable the examination of how cultural, legal, public health, and human rights policies and practices impact intimate partner violence.

    Presented by Gabriela Torres, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Kersti Yllö, Professor of Sociology

    Tuesday, April 19th
    12:30 p.m. - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

     

     

  • A decade of collaboration in the theatre

    Presented by Charlotte Meehan, Professor of English, and Stephanie Daniels, Associate Professor of Theatre on Thursday, April 14, 2016 from 12:30 to 1:30 pm in PDR. Read more>>>

    With a special emphasis on Charlotte Meehan's multimedia hootenanny-in-progress, Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: A User's Guide (timed to open in September just before this mad election), the two theatre artists will talk about their collaborations dating back to 2005 when Daniels directed a mainstage production of Meehan's SpellSong. That began a decade of continued work together with projects ranging from Looking for George, a multimedia plea to then President G.W. Bush to end the war in Iraq, to 27 Tips for Banishing the Blues (featured in the attached poster).

    We have lots to tell you about our activities in socially progressive experimental theatre, especially since the re-launch of Sleeping Weazel in Boston, and hope you will join the conversation. Please join Charlotte Meehan, Professor of English, and Stephanie Daniels, Associate Professor of Theatre for the next faculty lunch talk on:

    Thursday, April 14th
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Writing across, in and through the disciplines: what the research reveals

    Presented by Lisa Lebduska, Professor of English on Wednesday, April 6th at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend.

    The writer Donald Murray once observed that "writing may appear magic, but it is [teachers'] responsibility to take our students backstage to watch the pigeons being tucked up in the magician's sleeve." But what does he mean by that, and, how do we do it? Luckily, writing studies (also known as "composition and rhetoric") has devoted over a century to debating and studying answers to these rich and perpetual questions. Come backstage with me, and we'll explore some of the most recent research and how it translates into everyday classroom practices for all disciplines and all levels.

    Presented by Lisa Lebduska, Professor of English

    Date: Wednesday, April 6th
    Time: 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
    Place: President's Dining Room

    All are welcome to attend!

  • Rhetoric and racism: using writing spaces to talk and think about race

    Claudia Ward-de León, Emerson-Wheaton Writing Fellow presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Tues., March 29, 2016 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome.

    What happens when texts such as Gloria Anzaldua's "How to Tame a Wild Tongue" elicit racist and xenophobic commentary in the classroom? And how do faculty respond to this kind of student commentary while meeting students where they are? We'll discuss a strategy that utilizes rhetorical analysis, writing, and revision as tools for promoting intellectual growth and the inclusion of various racial, ethnic, and gender identities. Please note, it is recommended that you review the attached pre-workshop reading material prior to the presentation if possible.

    The Faculty Lunch Talk is presented by Claudia Ward-de León, Emerson-Wheaton Writing Fellow.  All are welcome to attend.

    Tuesday, March 29th
    12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room

  • Claude Shannon and the Magna Carta of the Information Age

    Professor William Goldbloom Bloch, Mathematics, presents the next faculty lunch talk on Thursday, March 24th at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome to attend. Read more>>>

    The Information Age and the Internet are richly complex systems whose origins found many different contributors playing key roles. Claude Shannon, whose centennial is being celebrated this year, was born in a small town in the upper peninsula of Michigan. At MIT, then at Bell Labs, and then back again at MIT, he changed the world. He defined ‘Information' by quantifying it, he was the first person to publish the word “bit” (in the ‘binary digit’ sense), and he dreamt up and elegantly proved theorems relating bandwidth, noisy channels, encoding, and the preservation of information. Most importantly, he saw that all information could be digitized, thus launching an ongoing revolution in the communications industry. This math-free talk is essentially a pictorial biography of Shannon based on archival research and interviews I conducted with luminaries from Bell Labs and MIT, and with his daughter, Peggy.

    Don’t go to the ill-timed meeting of the Curriculum Working Group on Interdisciplinarity! Instead, come see interdisciplinarity in action as a mathematician metamorphoses into a historian!

    Presented by Bill Goldbloom Bloch, Professor of Mathematics.

    Thursday, March 24, 2016
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

  • Not too close together, nor too far apart: Negotiating research-community relations during anthropological fieldwork

    Presented by Visiting Asst. Prof. of Anth. Mentor Mustafa, Wednesday, March 9, 2016 at 12:30 pm in PDR. Read more>>>

    Regardless of the community under study, cultural anthropologists are charged with the task of capturing other people’s points of view. As we live and study among the communities that we want to understand, anthropologists differ in the way that they relate to the people that they study. Some maintain their outsider status while others delve in and even convert in order to get as close as possible to the insiders’ perspectives. Making use of the experience of fieldwork with a contemporary community of Albanian Sufi Mystics of Islam, this semi-formal talk traces the twists and turns in the very fieldworker-community relationship. In doing so, the author’s experience does not reflect a stable relationship that is easily defined as either an “outsider” or “insider” positionality but a negotiated and fluid relationship that oscillated from being received as a suspect visitor to an uninitiated member of the Bektashi.

    Please join us for the next Faculty Lunch Talk presented by Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology Mentor Mustafa on:

    Wednesday, March 9, 2016
    12:30 - 1:30 pm
    President's Dining Room

  • The dark side of shareholder litigation: evidence from corporate takeovers

    Eddie Zhao, Assistant Professor of Business and Management presents a talk on the effects of shareholder litigation at the next Faculty Lunch Talk. Wed., Feb. 24th at 12:30 pm in PDR. Read more…

    The value effect of shareholder litigation has been controversial. Exploiting the staggered adoption of universal demand (UD) laws by 23 states between 1989 and 2005 as quasi-natural experiments, we show that reduced shareholder litigation threat improves corporate takeover efficiency. Using a difference-in-differences approach, we find that acquirers from states that adopt UD laws experience significantly higher abnormal announcement stock returns. We also document that UD laws are associated with better long-run post-merger operating performances. Taken together, our findings suggest that the threat of shareholder litigation leads to inefficient mergers and acquisitions and therefore destroys value ex ante.

    Wednesday's Faculty Lunch talk is presented by Eddie Zhao, Assistant Professor of Business and Management. All are welcome and encouraged to attend.

    Date: Wednesday, February 24, 2016
    Time: 12:30 - 1:30 pm
    Place: President's Dining Room

     

     

  • The women who counted and buried the dead in early morning England

    Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellow Wanda Henry, History, presents the first in the series of Spring 2016 Faculty Lunch Talks. All are welcome. Thurs., Feb. 18, 2016, 12:30 pm in PDR. Read more…

    From the early sixteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century, women examined, counted, and buried the dead in London. Initially, the women served as part of an early warning system to help Tudor monarchs and other elites flee from plague, and later, parish clerks published the numbers in bills of mortality. Despite criticism about lack of medical training, parishes expanded the women’s responsibilities and relied upon these “searchers of the dead” to determine all causes of death. Historians have assumed that Parliament established the General Register Office to supplant women searchers with medical men, acting as registrars. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the women’s work and explain how undertakers, rather than medical men, replaced the women as reporters of cause of death.

    Presented by Wanda Henry, Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellow in History

    Thursday, February 18th
    12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
    President's Dining Room