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ART 198: Digital Tools for Creative Expression & Design
ARTH 298/FNMS 298: Museums in the Digital Age
BIO 298: Research in Cell and Developmental Biology
CW 198: Foundations of Creative Writing
CHEM 153: Chemical Principles
CHEM 198: Understanding Pandemics
COMP 115/FNMS 115: Problem Solving and Python Programming
ECON 102: Introduction to Microeconomics
ECON 255: Corporate Finance
FNMS 244: Visualizing Cultural Data
HISP 325/WGS326: Queer Politics (taught in English)
MGMT 298: Internship Course
MUSC 208: Songwriting
MUSC 298: Stephen Sondheim and the American Musical
PSY 101: Introductory Psychology
THEA 102: Public Speaking
REL 102: Intro to the Study of World Religions
RUSS 281, Russian Art
RUSS 110: Beginning Russian I
THEA 298 VectorWorks for Production Design


ART 198: Digital Tools for Creative Expression & Design

Riel Sturchio
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

This course is an introduction to foundations of design using digital tools, such as Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator. Students will build upon their understanding of visual language, develop an artistic practice using digital tools, and apply their creativity and problem-solving skills and fundamental concepts of design. The course will include projects/assignments such as digital image editing, zine-building, and experimental logo design, which will challenge student creative expression and provide a broad set of contemporary digital skills. This class is beneficial to artists interested in interdisciplinary approaches to fine art, and will serve as a foundation for those interested in fields of graphic design, logo design or brand identity.

ARTH 298/FNMS 298: Museums in the Digital Age

Leah Niederstadt
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

From audio guides to crowdsourced exhibitions to award-winning social media accounts, museums have always experimented with the latest forms of technology, at times driven to do so by artists who incorporate new media into their work. Today, museums receive exponentially greater numbers of visitors to their websites than their physical sites, and the pace of technological change has staff scrambling to gather the human and financial resources needed to function in the digital age. This course explores how museums – highly respected, yet often controversial cultural institutions – use digital media and technologies to better care for their collections, engage their audiences, and navigate relationships with source communities.

BIO 298: Research in Cell and Developmental Biology

Bob Morris
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

How does scientific discovery really happen? Come learn the formal process of scientific research by participating in it yourself! In BIO 299 Research in Cell and Developmental Biology, students will carry out their own original research projects remotely to make discoveries in cell and developmental biology. The course will cover how to design and perform original experiments as well as how to analyze and publish original data. Research models for cell and developmental biology will include developing animals, plants and protists some of which will be at Wheaton and some of which will be provided in research kits sent to students’ locations. Original digital image data to address students’ hypotheses will be generated in Wheaton’s Imaging Center for Undergraduate Collaboration (ICUC) by the professor and will be analyzed remotely by the students. Because the course will generate original research discoveries, it will culminate with students submitting their work for peer review and publication. Come and advance the frontiers of scientific knowledge by trying your own collaborative research project in cell and developmental biology this January!

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CW 198: Foundations of Creative Writing

Kent Shaw
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

In this introductory creative writing workshop, we will read contemporary short fiction, poetry, and one-act plays with a focus on the rich myriad of writers whose works sometimes defy category altogether. Writing exercises will offer parameters that help you to develop your voice and content, but will not initially pre-determine form. Attention to language and ingenuity of expression will help you to push out of what playwright Mac Wellman refers to as the “already known” as you write your way to a developing aesthetic and form that suits what you want to say.

CHEM 153: Chemical Principles

Raluca Craciun
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

Basic concepts: atomic structure, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, gas laws, quantum theory, electron configurations, periodic relationships, chemical bonding and structure. Designed for science majors.

CHEM 198: Understanding Pandemics

Hilary Gaudet
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

In Understanding Pandemics, students will study the causes of pandemics, how they can be counteracted with vaccines and drugs, and how we can better prepare for them in the future. This course incorporates the study of biochemistry, biomedicine, virology, immunology, and public health. Students will also carry out virtual experiments. This course is open to students with minimal study in the sciences who need to fulfill the NS division requirement. It is also open to students with a substantive background in science.

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COMP 115/FNMS 115: Problem Solving and Python Programming

Mark LeBlanc
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Problem-solving techniques and algorithm development with emphasis on program design, introductory numerical methods, and object-oriented programming in the Python language. This course is intended for those seeking a thorough and rigorous exposure to programming. While this is the introductory course for the Computer Science major, it is appropriate for programming in any field. Topics covered include programming language syntax, coding, debugging, testing, and good documentation style. Concepts include arithmetic and logical operations, simple input and output, functions, and introductory data structures such as strings, arrays/lists, dictionaries, and classes.

ECON 102: Introduction to Microeconomics

James  Freeman
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Microeconomics explains economic behavior of decision makers in the economy consumers, business firms, resource owners and governments. Major topics include pricing and the operation of markets for goods and services and for resources, the behavior of firms and industries in different market settings, income distribution and public policy.

ECON 255: Corporate Finance

Fatima Jebari
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

The economics of corporate finance. Topics include capital budgeting, financial structure and the cost of capital, sources and forms of long- and short-term financing, the operations of the capital market, corporate taxes and the control of corporations.

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FNMS 244: Visualizing Cultural Data

Josh Stenger
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

This is a project-based, hands-on introductory course for anyone with an interest in data visualization and information design. No prior experience with design, data science, or programming is necessary. Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will use entry-level tools to build visualizations that produce meaningful insights. Projects will include designing an information dashboard, a narrative infographic, an interactive map, and a multi-panel interactive visual story. Over the course of the summer session, students will learn to combine creative, critical, and computational thinking in ways that will strengthen their information fluency and digital literacy skills, skills that are increasingly important to academic success and professional pursuits alike.

HISP 325/WGS326: Queer Politics (taught in English)

Montserrat Pérez-Toribio
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

This course will provide a framework to study the historical and theoretical foundations of queer theory and queer activism. We will explore how queer theory problematizes stable identities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures. We will discuss what happens when people challenge or refuse normativized sexuality and gender categories and look at how queer citizens are caught within the processes of nationalism, neocolonialism, globalization and neoliberalism. We will start the semester reading canonical texts by Michel Foucault, Teresa de Lauretis, Eve Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Gayle Rubin, Judith Halberstam or Gloria Anzaldúa that will help us understand the interdisciplinary scholarship that we will explore during the second half of the semester. The second part of the course will address the question of queerness by analyzing literature, film and cultural products focusing primarily on explicit representation of LGBTQ characters and communities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures.

MGMT 298: Internship Course

Leanna Lawter
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Your internship is an experiential learning opportunity where you can practices the skills and expertise that you have acquired in you classes to a real world problem. An internship for academic course allows you to grow professionally and personally by using your internship as a platform for developing learning objectives and reflecting on how you have (or have not) accomplished those learning objectives. This course focuses on guiding your learning in your internship in a manner that promotes reflection and furthers your understanding of how our liberal arts and business education are valuable tools in your future career.

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MUSC 208: Songwriting

Del Case
T, W, Th, F   9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

An introduction to the processes, materials, and aesthetic issues involved in creating and analyzing songs within the post-1960 folk/singer-songwriter traditions. Coursework will include both creative and analytical assignments. Enrollment by permission of instructor. For additional information about this course, please see the Wheaton Blog.

MUSC 298: Stephen Sondheim and the American Musical

Ann Sears
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

Beginning his musical theater journey as a protege of Oscar Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim (b. 1930) is currently the most critically acclaimed living musical theater composer in America.  A brilliant lyricist and a composer of great originality, he has crafted some of Broadway’s most admired works.  This course will examine his writing for television, film, and the Broadway stage, as well as his influence on younger composers.

PSY 101: Introductory Psychology

Matthew Gingo
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

A survey of the basic principles and findings of psychology as a social and biological science and practice.

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THEA 102: Public Speaking

Jennifer Madden
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

This course provides the student with greater self-confidence and ease with speaking, while enhancing use of language, delivery and organization. Students will participate in an intensive series of prepared speeches, debates and impromptu exercises. Appropriate for all majors.

REL 102: Intro to the Study of World Religions

Barbara Darling
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

A survey of the major world religions for the beginning student. Religions discussed will include indigenous religions (American Indian and African traditions), religions of India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism), China (Taoism and Confucianism) and those originating in the Middle East (Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Religion will be considered as a worldview expressed through doctrine, myth, ethical system, ritual, personal experience and society.

RUSS 281: Russian Art

Francoise Rosset
T, W, Th, F  9:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Begins with a brief survey of Russian political history, then focuses on Russian and Soviet art, including some non-Russian works from former republics of the Soviet period (Georgia, Armenia, Latvia, Central Asia). Includes ballet and theatre, cinema and classical music as well as bard music and formerly underground rock, some literature and poetry, and art from the icons to the avant-garde to unofficial and official art.

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RUSSIAN 110: Beginning Russian I

Tom Dolack
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

The principal elements of the Russian language, including reading, writing, speaking and cultural awareness. Emphasis is placed on colloquial language and the ability to converse in Russian.

THEA 298: VectorWorks for Production Design

Colin McNamee
T, W, Th, F  2 – 4:30 p.m.

This project-based course builds a proficiency in Vectorworks as a production design tool for two- and three-dimensional modeling of venues, scenery, lighting, audio and more. We will explore Vectorworks as a creative and collaborative tool for developing and presenting design ideas, and as a vehicle for clear and efficient communication of finished specifications. Acquired skills may apply to all areas of entertainment and event design and production. While accessible to the beginner, this course is also designed to both  consolidate and expand skills gained in THEA205 Stagecraft and THEA302 Introduction to Lighting Design. Vectorworks software is available free to students. You must have a reliable, internet-connected computer (PC or Mac) meeting or exceeding the Vectorworks 2021 system requirements minimum hardware profile.

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