Earn a full credit in four weeks this summer!  All classes are taught by regular Wheaton faculty.

Registration Information

Courses for Summer Session 2019

On this page:

Summer Session I: 

Summer Session II


Summer Session I

ARTS 260: Production I

An intensive hands-on introduction to the art and craft of visual storytelling with film/video. The class is conceptually divided into four core areas; Image, Sound, Editing, and Storytelling. Students plan, shoot, and edit two short non-sync (no dialogue) projects while engaging in a broad exploration of the technical and artistic components of filmmaking. These projects are supported by in-class exercises, discussion, readings and some film screenings.

Satisfies Arts and Humanities (AH) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Patrick Johnson
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

ARTH 212: African Visual Cultures

This course provides an introduction to the rich, diverse, and inspiring world of African art. We will examine the varied ways that African art has shaped and been shaped by the histories and cultural values of different African peoples, both in the past and during the present day. This course will strengthen the student’s ability to critically assess the role of art in Africa for the people who produce and use it, and will provide an understanding of the role of African art in the West for the people who collect, exhibit, view, and study it. Towards this end, we will look at diverse art forms, such as sculpture, painting, ceramics, masquerade, dance, literature, feature film, documentary film, and other forms of popular culture. We will also visit art museums and galleries in order to experience African art firsthand. Topics of study will include social political, religious, philosophical, gendered, and aesthetic practices.

Satisfies Beyond the West (BW) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Kim Miller
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

ARTH 298: The Business of Art

How is the financial value of a work of art determined, and how do these values change over time? In this course we will explore the long history of art-as-commodity in Western culture, with special emphasis on the contemporary era. From medieval guild contracts to the dizzying auction-house sales and art fairs of today, students will consider the philosophical, aesthetic, and economic consequences of art’s intersection with commerce. Additionally, students will consider the economics of such related areas as art tourism, forgeries, and the art spoils of war.

Satisfies Arts and Humanities (AH) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Tripp Evans
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

BIO 105: Nutrition

Nutrition: The course focuses on nutrients and their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life and health issues such as dieting, exercise, weight control, eating disorders, heart disease, cancer, safety of food additives, genetically modified foods and farming practices. Students will carry out an independent project.

Satisfies Natural Science (NS) Divisional General Education requirement.

Faculty: Shari Morris
T W R F 9:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Limit 15 students.

Additional lab fee for students

Back to top ^

CHEM 198: Forensic Chemistry and Crime Scene Analysis

This course is designed for students interested in pursuing topics related to forensic chemistry and crime scene investigations. Fundamental concepts derived from basic general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and forensic chemistry will be examined in the context of crime scene investigations. Topics will include evidence collection and preservation; atomic clues; chemical evidence; drug chemistry; chemistry of heat, fire, and explosions; nuclear chemistry as related to medicine, weapons, and terrorism; poisons; and DNA analysis. Real-life case studies on drug deals, murders, and thefts will be explored with each topic. The laboratory will focus on forensic chemistry techniques. This course is open to students with minimal study in the sciences but who may be interested in forensic science as well as those with a substantive background in science.

Satisfies Natural Science (NS) Divisional General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Hilary Gaudet
T W R F 9:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Back to top ^

CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication.

Satisfies Foreign Language (FL) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Yi-Ting Pomfred
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

FNMS 244: Visualizing Cultural Data

This is a project-based, hands-on introductory course for anyone with an interest in data visualization and information design. No prior experience with design, data science, or programming is necessary. Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will use entry-level tools to build visualizations that produce meaningful insights. Projects will include designing an information dashboard, a narrative infographic, an interactive map, and a multi-panel interactive visual story. Over the course of the summer session, students will learn to combine creative, critical, and computational thinking in ways that will strengthen their information fluency and digital literacy skills, skills that are increasingly important to academic success and professional pursuits alike.

Satisfies Quantitative Analysis (QA) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Josh Stenger
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

INT-085 S – Summer Internship Experience I: Diversity in America

This course, designed for students who have secured a summer internship or research opportunity, integrates your on-site learning and contextualizes your experiences from an academic perspective. Taught in several sections by faculty from different divisions, students in each section will read texts and examine timely issues germane to work in today’s global economy. Though this .50 credit course involves some on-line and some on-campus coursework, internships may take place anywhere in the world.

For more information contact Professor Dolita Cathcart at cathcart_dolita@wheatoncollege.edu.

INT-090 S – Summer Internship Experience II: Diversity in America

This course, designed for students who have secured a summer internship or research opportunity, integrates your on-site learning and contextualizes your experiences from an academic perspective. Taught in several sections by faculty from different divisions, students in each section will read texts and examine timely issues germane to work in today’s global economy. Though this .50 credit course involves some on-line and some on-campus coursework, internships may take place anywhere in the world.

For more information contact Professor Dolita Cathcart at cathcart_dolita@wheatoncollege.edu.

INT-095 S – Summer Internship Experience III: Diversity in America

This course, designed for students who have secured a summer internship or research opportunity, integrates your on-site learning and contextualizes your experiences from an academic perspective. Taught in several sections by faculty from different divisions, students in each section will read texts and examine timely issues germane to work in today’s global economy. Though this .50 credit course involves some on-line and some on-campus coursework, internships may take place anywhere in the world.

For more information contact Professor Dolita Cathcart at cathcart_dolita@wheatoncollege.edu.

Back to top ^

MGMT 398: Working and Managing in a Cross-Cultural Business World

Exploring the latest approaches to cross-cultural management and working in a global business world, presenting strategies and tactics for managing international assignments and global teams. With a clear emphasis on learning and development to encourage students to acquire skills in multicultural competence that will be highly valued by their future employers. These skills have never been more important in a world where, increasingly, all managers are global managers and where management practices and processes can differ significantly across national and regional boundaries.

Satisfies Social Sciences (SS) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Prerequisite course: MGMT 111: Fundamentals of Business. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Kenneth Bray
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

PHIL 125: Logic

An introduction to categorical, propositional and predicate logic with particular emphasis on methods of discovering and proving the validity of arguments. Designed to improve students’ ability to reason clearly and precisely. Analysis of logical equivalence, soundness and the relation of truth to validity.

Satisfies Quantitative Analysis (QA) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Teresa Celada
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

PSY 141: Statistics for the Social Sciences

This course is intended for students in disciplines that require knowledge of statistical methods used in behavioral and social science research.  Emphasis is on the conceptual understanding of statistics within the context of research.  Relevant research topics are discussed and linked to the appropriate statistical methods.  This course is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of probability theory as well as the basic statistical techniques and procedures used by researchers in the social sciences. You will learn how to organize and present data, and how to select, run, and interpret various statistical tests. The course focuses on the use of statistical techniques as tools in the scientific process and will introduce students to SPSS, a common statistical analysis software for the social sciences. The emphasis is on mastery of the concepts and logic underlying statistical manipulations. At the end of the course, you should be able to understand and appreciate the value of statistical procedures not only as they apply to the social sciences but also as they apply to our thinking as social scientists.

Satisfies Quantitative Analysis (QA) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Gail Sahar
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

PSY 398: Psychological Research Lab

Have you been looking for a way to gain firsthand research experience? This course is an opportunity to collaborate on a psychological research project from the initial design stage all the way to the final written report. In this course, you will be introduced to the important conceptual, practical, and ethical issues involved in doing psychological research. Students will gain experience conducting a publishable study that they help craft. We will read the existing literature, develop hypotheses, design the methods and materials, collect and analyze data, and write up our initial findings. This course is open to all students, especially those who are considering going on to a graduate program in the social sciences. Satisfies Social Sciences (SS) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Michael Berg
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

REL 102: Introduction to the Study of World Religions

What does it mean to study “religion” or “world religions”? Does it mean to survey the different religions of the world cafeteria style: a taste of Buddhism today, Hinduism tomorrow, Judaism and Wicca next week, and so on? Or is there some quality or set of qualities that all religions share? In this course, we will start out by surveying world religions, but we will move on to comparing them self-consciously and intentionally, to get at that elusive quality or set of qualities that make something, or some experiences, or someone, or better, some groups “religious.” And is “religious” the same as “spiritual”? There will be a strong experiential component in this class: e.g., site visits to places of worship, designing your own rituals (some involving food), and keeping a dream journal. We will pay particular attention to understanding the role of the imagination, paranormal or “Super Natural” phenomena, and perhaps paradoxically, the experience of religion as everyday life in different cultures.

Satisfies Beyond the West (BTW) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus and Jeff Timm
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

RUSS 298: Russia’s “East” — Literature and Culture

Much of Russia and the former Soviet Union sits right at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Islamic world. During its period of imperial expansion, Russia absorbed large territories along with their indigenous peoples, among them Mongols, Koreans, Persians, Chechens, Uzbeks, Yakuts, Buryats. While the Russians and Soviets had a significant influence on the region, to this day the cultures of this vast area maintain much of what made and still makes them distinctive. This course will examine the mix of cultures that makes “Russia’s East” so special.

Satisfies Beyond the West (BTW) General Education requirement. Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Tom Dolack
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

SOC 175: Media and Society

This course will explore the underlying forces and provide analytical tools to evaluate popular culture and media critically. An overall goal is to become media literate, to gain an understanding of mass media as cultural industries that seek to influence our behavior and affect our values as a society. The overarching question is: How do race, social class, gender, sexuality, and disability influence the production, content, audience, and social world for television, music, film, magazines, books, and the Internet, both in the United States and abroad?

Satisfies Social Sciences (SS) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Nihal Celik
T W R F 2:00pm- 4:30pm

Back to top ^

THEA 298: Improvisation for Work and Life

Improvisation for Work and Life is a theatre class that focuses on the skills learned through the Harold improv technique, focusing on games and exercises that help students to think more quickly on their feet and public speaking, challenges them to make big choices, and reap the benefits of taking risks. Improv is an excellent tool for all students to acquire, can be easily absorbed and translated to any field of study from science to business, and also builds community and interpersonal skills.

Satisfies Arts and Humanities (AH) Divisional General Education requirement.  Limit 15 students.

Faculty: Stephanie Daniels
T W R F 9:30am- 12:00pm

Back to top ^

Summer Session II

COMP 115: Introduction to Programming: Robots, Games and Problem Solving

This course will explore problem solving techniques and algorithm development with an emphasis on program design, introductory numerical methods, and object-oriented programming. This course is intended for those seeking a thorough and rigorous but introductory exposure to programming. Topics covered will include programming language syntax (Python v3), coding, debugging, testing and good documentation style. Concepts studied will include arithmetic and logical operations, file input and output, functions, and the introductory data structures of arrays/lists and classes. No previous programming experience is required.

Faculty: Mark LeBlanc
M T W R 9:00am- 12:00pm Weeks 1, 2 and 4

M T W R 1:00pm-3:30pm Week 3, July 22 to 25

Back to top ^

MGMT 111: Fundamentals of Business

This course will provide an overview and understanding of the major functions and activities of the business world, including international business. All fundamentals will be explored: ethics, organizational behavior, leadership, human resources, communication, product conception, finance, operations and marketing. Working as a team, you will develop a business plan for a theoretical business of your team’s choice, applying and integrating the skills you learn in this course while working creatively and collaboratively. Case studies and current events will be analyzed, and a strong emphasis is placed on participation, communication and teamwork.

Faculty: Charles Chapman
M T W R 9:00am- 12:00pm

 

Back to top ^