Earn a full credit in four weeks this summer!  All classes are taught by Wheaton faculty.

Registration Information

Courses for Summer Session 2020

On this page:

Summer Session I: 

Summer Session II


Summer Session I

Tuesday, May 19 – Friday, June 12, 2020

ANTH 266: Global Health

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors

Are we helping or hurting in the work of global health? This course will engage you in understanding how inequality shapes the ways that world health issues are experienced, accounted for and made into profit. This course focuses particularly on gender and studies (1) how unequal access to power shapes reproductive health, the spread of sexually transmitted diseases and other forms of gender-based health disparities; and (2) how gendered power imbalances shapes the knowledge produced in the growing field of global health. Satisfies BW requirement.

Faculty: Gabriela Torres

ARTH 335: Exhibition Design

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
This course introduces students to the history, practice and theory of exhibition design. In this course, we will engage in all aspects of the exhibition design process through reading, in-class discussions, site visits, and guest lectures as well as the design and installation of an exhibition. We will consider the visitor experience and how objects and ideas are interpreted by and for different audiences, as well as how museums use technology to engage the public. Students will gain an understanding of the history of exhibition design as well as the challenges museums/like institutions face in making their collections accessible to the communities they serve. Students will be required to participate fully in the practical component of the course, which involves research for and design and installation of long-term displays for the May Room and the second floor of Mary Lyon Hall. Cross-listed with FNMS 335. Satisfies AH requirement. Can fulfill major requirements for Business & Management, History of Art, Film & New Media Studies, and Visual Art.

Faculty: Leah Niederstadt

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BIO 105: Principles of Nutrition

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
 
The course focuses on nutrients and their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life and health issues such as dieting, exercise, weight control, eating disorders, heart disease, cancer, safety of food additives, genetically modified foods and farming practices. Students will carry out an independent project. Satisfies NS requirement.

Faculty: Shari Morris

BIO 105: Principles of Nutrition

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. 

The course focuses on nutrients and their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life and health issues such as dieting, exercise, weight control, eating disorders, heart disease, cancer, safety of food additives, genetically modified foods and farming practices. Students will carry out an independent project. Satisfies NS requirement.

Faculty: Susan Barrett

BIO 298: Principles of Developmental Biology

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors who have taken high school biology
The course investigates the cellular and molecular mechanisms of organismal development with an emphasis on common developmental strategies among animals. Developmental biology is an integrative subject applying knowledge from molecular to organismal scales and it raises ethical issues from the definition of personhood to the use of stem cells to reverse aging. Additional topics to be covered include fertilization, gene regulation, cell differentiation, axis formation, neurodevelopment, and sex determination. Prerequisites: BIO 112, AP Biology, or permission of instructor. Part of CONX 23012: Visualizing Information. Satisfies NS requirement.

Faculty: Bob Morris

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BIO 398: Virology

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m. 

This course will explore the biology of viruses. We will begin with a basic overview, including the structure and evolution of viruses and the various processes of viral infections. In the second part of the course we will consider viral pathogenesis and epidemiology, as well as noting viral impacts on ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIO 221: Microbiology OR BIO 211: Genetics OR BIO 298: Principles of Cell Biology.

Faculty: Amy Beumer

CHEM 198: Forensic Chemistry and Crime Scene Analysis

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
This course is designed for students interested in pursuing topics related to forensic chemistry and crime scene investigations. Fundamental concepts derived from basic general chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and forensic chemistry will be examined in the context of crime scene investigations. Topics will include evidence collection and preservation; atomic clues; chemical evidence; drug chemistry; chemistry of heat, fire, and explosions; nuclear chemistry as related to medicine, weapons, and terrorism; poisons; and DNA analysis. Real-life case studies on drug deals, murders, and thefts will be explored with each topic. The laboratory will focus on forensic chemistry techniques. This course is open to students with minimal study in the sciences but who may be interested in forensic science as well as those with a substantive background in science. Satisfies NS requirement.

Faculty: Hilary Gaudet

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CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese II

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
For those who have learned the basics of Mandarin Chinese before, such as greeting, self-introduction and pinyin system. We will use Integrated Chinese Book I as a textbook. Lesson 3 and Lesson 4 will be covered during the summer course. Satisfies FL requirement.

Faculty: Yi-Ting Pomfred

CW 284: Writing Flash Fiction

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Open to current Seniors who are incoming Wheaton students with 3 AP English courses or permission of instructor 

Language. Imagery. Surprise. Manipulating these three elements we will write and share complete stories of 250 words—probably a story or two each day! We’ll also roam around on the web to find examples of this very popular form, including among the wedding and engagement announcements in the New York Times. And we’ll read published flash fictions, including flash fictions published by students in the fiction workshop at Wheaton. This course satisfies requirements for the Creative Writing and Literature major and AH requirement.

Faculty: Deyonne Bryant

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EDUC 350: Mindfulness in School/Society

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
Through scholarly study and experiential learning, this course provides an introduction to contemplative studies. Students examine mindfulness and contemplative studies as they engage in such practices and explore connections to teaching, learning, schooling and living. Mindfulness draws on the innate wisdom of our minds and bodies to develop calm, concentration, and insight, and to foster personal growth.

 The course is open to all students and may serve as one of two education foundations courses for the education major as well as a 300-level course in the contemplative studies minor. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: MaryLee Griffin

ENG 298/POLS 298: The Literature and Theory of Social Distancing

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m. 

What problems and possibilities does social distancing raise for us as individuals and members of a community? What accounts for our simultaneous attraction to and horror of the possibility of being alone? Is it possible to think of social distancing not as a “break” from the real world or absence from life, but an alternative experience of life itself? How does social distancing stand to mitigate and/or exacerbate existing social inequalities? In this team-taught course, we bring together literary and political studies to understand the human history of “social distancing,” interrogating the past to shed light on our current moment. Readings include Robinson Crusoe, The Haunting of Hill House, Walden, and the Buddhist monk Kamo no Chōmei’s “An Account of my Hut,” as well as selections from political theorists including Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Charles Mills, and Judith Butler. Satisfies AH or SS requirement.

Faculty: Winter Jade Werner and Nick Dorzweiler

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FNMS 244: Visualizing Cultural Data

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.

This is a project-based, hands-on introductory course for anyone with an interest in data visualization and information design. No prior experience with design, data science, or programming is necessary. Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will use entry-level tools to build visualizations that produce meaningful insights. Projects will include designing an information dashboard, a narrative infographic, an interactive map, and a multi-panel interactive visual story. Over the course of the summer session, students will learn to combine creative, critical, and computational thinking in ways that will strengthen their information fluency and digital literacy skills, skills that are increasingly important to academic success and professional pursuits alike. Satisfies QA requirement.

Faculty: Josh Stenger

GER 298 Nazi Cinema and Fascist Aesthetics

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
This course examines the films of the interwar and Nazi periods and their socio-historical, politico-cultural and aesthetic contexts of production. It covers a wide variety of works from the 1920s to the 1940s and is thematically structured around topics such as “mass culture and modernity,” “body politics,” and “fascist aesthetics.” Discussions will also focus on the current resurgence of right wing groups in Europe as well as in the US and how we can sharpen our sensibilities towards fascist elements in our current global culture. Connectable to POLS 215, HIST 113, 214, 228, 240, 327, SOC 240. Can be taken as GER 398 to satisfy FL requirement. Taught in English. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Tessa Lee

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HIST 235: U.S. Military History

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
Today, polls show that the U.S. military is among the most highly respected institutions in the nation. It was not always so, however. The nation’s founders mistrusted the large armies of Europe, and wanted something different. But what? Throughout America’s history, the role of the military has been a subject of debate and disagreement. This course will focus on the history of the U.S. armed forces, from a colonial militia to a small standing army, to today’s global police behemoth. We will examine the role of the U.S. armed forces in America’s conflicts from the Revolutionary and Civil Wars to the twentieth-century World Wars, to Operation Enduring Freedom/ Operation Iraqi Freedom. We will survey important elements of military affairs – tactics, strategy, doctrine, logistics, training, and more – as we investigate the changing role of the military in American society. Part of CONX 21001: War and Violence with POLS 357. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Anni Cecil

INT 80, 90, 95: The Summer Internship Experience: Diversity in America

Diversity in America: This course, designed for students who have secured a summer internship or research opportunity, integrates your on-site learning and contextualizes your experiences from an academic perspective. Taught in several sections by faculty from different divisions, students in each section will read texts and examine timely issues germane to work in today’s global economy. Though this .50 credit course involves some on-line and some on-campus coursework, internships may take place anywhere in the world.

Faculty: Dolita Cathcart

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MATH 141 : Introductory Statistics

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

An introduction to the language, methods and applications of Statistics. Data from numerous fields are used to show the many uses of basic statistical practice, with use of statistical software. Topics include: data summary, graphical techniques, elementary probability, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, inferential procedures such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means and proportions, chi-square test, simple and multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Faculty: Rachelle DeCoste

MGMT 298: Women in the Workforce

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
This course will explore the progression of women as a vital part of the United States workforce and the resulting social issues which arose from this change. The course will focus on three key areas: the history of women in the workforce, both as domestic workers and as modern industrialized workers; the social issues which arose as women became an integral part of the workforce;and the modern issues facing women today as they enter the workforce and pursue their careers. Additionally, this course will examine the underlying reasons resulting from gender roles as they relate to work related issues. Will count toward the Equity, Diversity, and Social Responsibility concentration in Business and Management major. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Leanna Lawter

MGMT 350: Marketing

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
Marketing is a process of creating, communicating, and delivering value to customers in a way that benefits organizations and stakeholders. We will examine the role of marketing in society, consumer behavior, product management, pricing, distribution and promotion. Marketing strategy and its application in a range of industries (consumer goods and services, business-to-business settings, and not-for-profit organizations) will be introduced. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Kenneth Bray

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MUSC 275: History of Popular Music

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
It may be argued that America’s most powerful contribution to the arts and culture of the world over the last century has been its popular music. From the blues to country, jazz to rock, our nation’s political, social, and economic history has been mirrored and influenced by the styles of popular music that have developed in our unique cultural melting pot. This course will provide an overall history of popular music in America during the 20th century, with emphasis upon mainstream popular music since 1954. Its focus will be the simultaneous independence and interdependence of black and white musical cultures in America, and how this can help us understand our nation’s history in new and different ways. In addition to learning about the stylistic development of popular music, students will acquire various interpretive strategies (including methods of aural analysis) that will allow them to approach popular songs as historical “texts” as well as autonomous works of art. NOTE: You do NOT need to read music or play an instrument to take this course. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Delvyn Case

PHIL 111: Ethics

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

An introduction to moral reasoning through the study of ethical theories and their application to practical problems such as capital punishment, world hunger, animal rights and the environment. Special attention to developing and defending one’s own moral positions. Readings from traditional and contemporary sources. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Teresa Celada

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PHIL 125: Logic

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
An introduction to categorical, propositional and predicate logic with particular emphasis on methods of discovering and proving the validity of arguments. Designed to improve students’ ability to reason clearly and precisely. Analysis of logical equivalence, soundness and the relation of truth to validity. Satisfies QA and AH requirements.

Faculty: Nancy Kendrick

PHYS 110: Electronic Circuits

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
An introduction to modern electronics, which progresses from simple circuits using discrete solid-state components to those using integrated circuits common to computers and control devices. Students will gain insight into the way computers work and learn how to use microcomputers to control simple devices. This class involves building numerous circuits using simulators and some independent projects. No previous work in physics or electronics is required. Part of CONX 20003 – Logic and Digital Circuits, CONX 20022 – Computer Architecture. Satisfies NS requirement.

Faculty: Xuesheng Chen

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POLS 101: Introduction to American Politics

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30.p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors, experience with Civics preferred but not required

This course provides an introduction to the study of American political institutions and processes. During the course of the semester, we will attempt to understand why the American political system functions the way it does. In so doing, we will consider the purpose and consequences of the U.S. Constitution and the American federal system. We will study the role of public opinion and elections, parties, and interest groups in formulating public policy. We will also explore the three major political branches in the American system—the executive, legislative, and judicial. The primary aim of this course is to acquire a better understanding of the complexities of American government and politics and to be introduced to the discipline of political science. This course is intended for those who are interested in a deeper understanding of the American political system as part of their general education as well as those who may be interested in a political science major or minor. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Brad Bishop

PSY 141: Statistics for the Social Sciences

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

This course is intended for students in disciplines that require knowledge of statistical methods used in behavioral and social science research. It is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of probability theory as well as the basic statistical techniques and procedures used by researchers in the social sciences. You will learn how to organize and present data, and how to select, run, and interpret various statistical tests. The course focuses on the use of statistical techniques as tools in the scientific process and will introduce students to SPSS, a common statistical analysis software for the social sciences. You will learn to critically evaluate research conclusions in the social science literature and in the popular press. Finally, you will be prepared to design and conduct quantitative research and clearly communicate your findings and conclusions. Satisfies SS and QA requirements.

Faculty: Gail Sahar

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PSY 211: Learning and Memory

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
A study of memory from behavioral, cognitive and biological perspectives. Reviews principles of classical and operant conditioning as they have been established through animal research and applied in behavior therapy and takes a cognitive approach to human memory, with an emphasis on information-processing theories. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Kathleen Morgan

PSY 230: Psychology of Consciousness

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
One of the most fundamental questions human beings face is this: Why are we conscious? How do our minds come to have a subjective awareness of the world? The sense of awareness of the world is a deeply familiar feeling, yet satisfying explanations of why we are conscious and what consciousness is for remain elusive. This course explores the question from a variety of viewpoints, including the philosophical, cognitive, and neuroscientific, introducing a number of perspectives and key ideas from the interdisciplinary field of consciousness studies, with a particular focus on empirical investigation. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Rolf Nelson

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PSY 225: Brain, Mind and Behavior

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.

An introduction to biopsychology through a survey of topics that focus on the structure, function, and development of the nervous system as well as how this system produces various behaviors such as sensation and perception, sleep, language, learning, and clinical disorders. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Lisa Maeng

REL 102: Introduction to the Study of World Religions

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors

A survey of the major world religions for the beginning student. Religions discussed will include indigenous religions (American Indian and African traditions), religions of India (Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism), China (Taoism and Confucianism) and those originating in the Middle East (Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Religion will be considered as a worldview expressed through doctrine, myth, ethical system, ritual, personal experience and society. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Barbara Darling and Jonathan Brumberg Kraus

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RUSS 282: Russian Film

T,W,R and F
2 – 4:30 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
The course will acquaint you with the culture of modern Russia through its cinema. Lectures with discussion and analysis of a series of Russian films from Eisenstein to current productions, emphasizing content and moral/political issues as well as artistic technique. Part of CONX23018 -Cinema/Kino: Film in Russia and CONX23020 -All the Russians. Class taught exclusively in English. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Tom Dolack

SOC 198: Introduction to Sociology: Health & Healthcare

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors

This course will cover introductory sociological concepts and theoretical approaches with particular attention to the topics of health and illness, mental health and illness, and healthcare. Students interested in careers as doctors, nurses, mental health counselors, or other healthcare professionals will learn how factors such as class, race, gender, and other identity categories intersect and affect health outcomes and illness experience. Will count as SOC 101 for majors. Satisfies SS requirement.

Faculty: Lara Birk

THEA 102: Public Speaking: Effective Communication

T,W,R and F
9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors
Communicating effectively is an essential leadership skill. This online course will help you achieve greater confidence and expertise as a communicator while further developing your unique voice and style. We will examine all aspects of the communication process: how to compose effective, interesting speeches, establish meaningful connections with audiences of any size (whether that audience consists of a small group or fills an auditorium) and master the critical art of persuasive speaking. Satisfies AH requirement.

Faculty: Jennifer Madden

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Summer Session II

Wednesday, July 8 – Thursday, July 30, 2020

COMP 115: Introduction to Programming: Robots, Games and Problem Solving

Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors

This course will explore problem-solving techniques and algorithm development with an emphasis on program design, introductory numerical methods, and object-oriented programming. This course is intended for those seeking a thorough and rigorous but introductory exposure to programming. Topics covered will include programming language syntax (Python v3), coding, debugging, testing and good documentation style. Concepts studied will include arithmetic and logical operations, file input and output, functions, and the introductory data structures of arrays/lists and classes. No previous programming experience is required. In addition to coursework, you will have the opportunity to use cutting-edge tools in Wheaton makerspaces (such as 3-D printers, a laser printer/engraver, and a digital jacquard loom), as well as engage with visiting tech professionals.

MGMT 111: Fundamentals of Business

Also open to non-Wheaton students and current high school juniors or seniors

This course will provide an overview and understanding of the major functions and activities of the business world, including international business. All fundamentals will be explored: ethics, organizational behavior, leadership, human resources, communication, product conception, finance, operations, and marketing. Working as a team, you will develop a business plan for a theoretical business of your team’s choice, applying and integrating the skills you learn in this course while working creatively and collaboratively. Case studies and current events will be analyzed, and a strong emphasis will be placed on participation, communication, and teamwork. In addition to coursework, you will have opportunities to learn from and network with area business professionals, gaining valuable exposure to professional life after college.

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