BIO 298 – R Bootcamp for Biologists

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Shawn Mcafferty

Data science and the ability to deal with and analyze large datasets has become on of the most important and fastest growing areas within the biological sciences today. In fact, one of the more important tools every undergraduate Bioscience student should have in their “science toolbox” is the ability to use the program R for routine data management, statistical analyses, and to produce high quality graphics of data. In this new age of “Big Data”, many employers expect if not require some familiarity with using R, and learning it now will give you an advantage when applying for jobs and graduate school.

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the fundamentals of using this incredibly valuable tool. There will be a specific focus on using R for data management, data wrangling, and QC, in addition to basic statistical analyses and how to make plots and graphs of your data for both data exploration and publication ready graphs. We will do this by introducing the basics of using R via the RStudio environment and the use of various packages that extend the power of R and make life with R a little easier, including the use of dplyr2 and ggplot2 (and other members of the tidyverse). Topics covered and example data sets will depend on the background and interests of the class.

This course is a good complement to any introductory statistics course (rather than a replacement). Having this class under your belt before taking stats will provide you with an invaluable tool for learning stats. Taking this class after basics stats will potentially provide a whole new set of tools for working with biological data, producing informative graphs, and the background to perform just about any kind of statistical analysis you can think of (if you can think of it, chances are someone has already written a package in R to do it!).

This course does not require any previous programming experience (though basic competence in using a computer as a tool in the biosciences is required), a background in statistics (though that certainly would help), or experience using graphics programs. Nor does this class require that you have prior research experience or experience in the analysis and collection of biological data (though that would help as well). Priority will be given to Senior and Junior Bioscience majors.

CHEM 153 – Chemical Principles

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Raluca Craciun

Basic concepts: atomic structure, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, gas laws, quantum theory, electron configurations, periodic relationships, chemical bonding and structure. Designed for science majors. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

COMP 131 – Computing for Poets

Monday – Friday
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m
Mark LeBlanc

The use of computers to manage the storage and retrieval of written texts creates new opportunities for scholars of ancient and other written works. Recent advances in computer software, hypertext and database methodologies have made it possible to ask novel questions about a story, a trilogy, an anthology or corpus. This course teaches computer programming as a vehicle to explore the formal symbol systems currently used to define our digital libraries of text. Programming facilitates top-down thinking and practice with real-world problem-solving skills such as problem decomposition and writing algorithms.

ENG 101 – Introduction to College Writing

Monday – Friday
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m
Wesley Jacques

The focus for the writing and reading varies from section to section, permitting students to follow special interests and explore new material. All sections introduce students to some college-level literacy practices. The topic for each of the sections will be announced before the date of course selections and sent to all entering students during the summer. Recent topics have included popular culture, London, multicultural lives, the environment and rebellion and authority.

FNMS 244 – Visualizing Cultural Data

Monday – Friday
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m
Josh Stenger

This is a project-based, hands-on introductory course for anyone with an interest in data visualization and information design. No prior experience with design, data science, or programming is necessary. Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will use entry-level tools to build visualizations that produce meaningful insights. Projects will include designing an information dashboard, a narrative infographic, an interactive map, and a multi-panel interactive visual story. Students will learn to combine creative, critical, and computational thinking in ways that will strengthen their information fluency and digital literacy skills, skills that are increasingly important to academic success and professional pursuits alike.

HISP 150 – Intermediate Spanish

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Monsterrat Pérez-Torbio

This intensive one-semester course provides further development and practice of all language skills. Comprehensive grammar review, with activities designed to enhance the fundamental skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing and cultural awareness. Four class meetings per week.

HISP 325/WGS 326 – Queer Politics and Hispanisms

Monday – Friday
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m
Monsterrat Pérez-Torbio

This course will provide a framework to study the historical and theoretical foundations of queer theory and queer activism. We will explore how queer theory problematizes stable identities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures. We will discuss what happens when people challenge or refuse normativized sexuality and gender categories and look at how queer citizens are caught within the processes of nationalism, neocolonialism, globalization and neoliberalism. We will start the semester reading canonical texts by Michel Foucault, Teresa de Lauretis, Eve Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Gayle Rubin, Judith Halberstam or Gloria Anzaldúa that will help us understand the interdisciplinary scholarship that we will explore during the second half of the semester. The second part of the course will address the question of queerness by analyzing literature, film and cultural products focusing primarily on explicit representation of LGBTQ characters and communities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures.

HIST 131 – Modern East Asia

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Shenglan Li

This course is an introduction to East Asian history from 1600 to the present. It surveys the integrated developments of China, Japan, and Korea from imperial states to modern nations. Thematically, the course covers changes of political regimes, the search for modernity, wars, imperialism and colonialism, nationalism and socialism, and socio-economic transformations. Attention is also given to everyday experiences, gender relations, philosophies and religions, and popular cultures. Throughout the course, we will rethink the conceptions and significance of terms such as “modern,” “East Asia,” and “nation.”

HIST 298 – Bringing History to the Public

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Dana Polanichka

The past permeates the present. History comes into our lives through the internet, social media, and popular culture–but not always based on solid research. If we hope to learn from the past, we must bring sound historical knowledge to the public in new, entertaining, and accessible ways. This class will explore how professional historians have and should share history through websites, blogs, social media, general marketing, and more–and then practice it by bringing the early medieval world of Charlemagne to the public. This Sophomore Experience will learn from professionals working in history, marketing, social media, editing, and more, and then create a digital platform for Carolingian history. The course should interest students in history, public history, medieval studies, digital humanities, editorial work, writing (including creative writing and journalism), popular culture, marketing, and web design. Students’ individual interests and skills will help focus coursework. No prior experience in medieval history required.

PSY 101 – Intro to Psychology

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Matthew Gingo

A survey of the basic principles and findings of psychology as a social and biological science and practice.

PSY 211 – Learning and Memory

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Kathleen Morgan

A study of memory from behavioral, cognitive and biological perspectives. Reviews principles of classical and operant conditioning as they have been established through animal research and applied in behavior therapy and takes a cognitive approach to human memory, with an emphasis on information-processing theories.

PSY 247 – Abnormal Psychology

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Srijana Shrestha

A survey of the chief forms of psychological disorder and current modes of explanation and treatment. Issues include the definitions of normality and abnormality and the goals of intervention. Case studies focus the discussion.

THEA 102 – Public Speaking

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Jennifer Madden

Public Speaking will help students achieve greater confidence and expertise as communicators while further developing their unique voice and style. We will examine all aspects of the communication process: how to compose effective, interesting speeches, establish meaningful connections with audiences of any size and utilize the critical art of persuasive speaking. Students will engage in debates, mock interviews, conflict resolution exercises, and deliver various presentations, ranging from informal to formal. By the end of this course, students will be able to speak with increased ease and deliver engaging, informative presentations to various audiences.

CHEM 198 – Forensic Science

Monday – Friday
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Hilary Gaudet

In this course, students will learn the basics of forensic science, including crime scene investigation, forensic biology (pathology, DNA typing, serology), forensic chemistry (toxicology, illicit drugs, fire, and explosives), and legal aspects of forensic science.