Earn a full credit in four weeks this summer!  All classes are taught by Wheaton faculty. All classes will be remote with the exception of ARTH 230.

Registration Information

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Summer Session I
Summer Session II

2022 Summer Session I

May 24-June 17, 2022

ARTH 230: Introduction to Museum Studies

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course introduces students to museum history and practice and to theoretical issues in museum studies. Students will explore the ways in which museums and like institutions represent people and cultures and will consider their missions, organizational structure and architecture, their role in the community and the contemporary challenges faced by museum practitioners.

Faculty: Leah Neiderstadt

BIO 105: Nutrition

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course focuses on nutrients, their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life, health issues such as diabetes, disordered eating, heart disease, cancer, as well as food safety, food insecurities and genetically modified foods. Students will keep a food journal and analyze their current diet.

Faculty: Shari Morris

BIO 298: Exercise Physiology

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

In this course, you will investigate the core principles of exercise physiology and develop the ability to apply your knowledge to real-world situations. We will explore the relationships between exercise and the body’s systems including the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. We will study current research and case studies in addition to lectures and required readings. This course serves as a requirement for many pre-Physical Therapy graduate schools.

Faculty: Laura Ekstrom

BIO 398: Fisheries Science & Management

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Fishing has been an economic and cultural driver in New England for centuries. This course will introduce students to (1) how life history characteristics of ecologically and/or economically important species are developed; (2) how this information is input into stock assessments and spatial-temporal decision-making actions; and (3) how the Federal fishery management and regulatory process is carried out.

Faculty: Robert Brock

CW 150: Foundations of Creative Writing

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

In this introductory creative writing workshop, we will read contemporary short fiction, poetry, and one-act plays with a focus on the rich myriad of writers whose works sometimes defy category altogether. Writing exercises will offer parameters that help you to develop your voice and content, but will not initially pre-determine form. Attention to language and ingenuity of expression will help you to push out of what playwright Mac Wellman refers to as the “already known” as you write your way to a developing aesthetic and form that suits what you want to say.

Faculty: Charlotte Meehan

ECON 102: Introduction to Microeconomics

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Microeconomics explains economic behavior of decision makers in the economy consumers, business firms, resource owners and governments. Major topics include pricing and the operation of markets for goods and services and for resources, the behavior of firms and industries in different market settings, income distribution and public policy.

Faculty: James Freeman

EDUC 110: Ponds to Particles I

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course is a deep dive into the concepts and phenomena built into the Massachusetts K-12 science frameworks. By the end of part I of this course you will know what K-12 students need to learn, how they will need to express that learning, and how to tap into students’ natural curiosity and playfulness to develop effective and engaging lessons. In other words, you’ll learn how to use fun as a teaching tool. While this is a two-semester course, students may take the fall course, the spring course, or both courses. Priority for this course is given to education majors, but it is open to anyone. The successful student in this course will be required to complete tasks that are specific to teaching science, including teaching writing and delivering actual lessons. The fall semester of the course focuses on the physical sciences. The spring semester of this course focuses on the environmental and life sciences. Elementary/Early-Childhood Education majors are strongly advised to take both semesters of this course.

Faculty: Rob LoPiccolo

EDUC 230: Teaching English Learners

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
6:30–9 p.m.

Teaching English Learners is a required course for all licensure majors. The course explores theories of second language acquisition and program models for English language teaching for students at all levels, preschool to adults. The course prepares Pre-K through grade 12 teachers to meet the needs of non-Native speakers in the classroom, as well as preparing individuals who may want to teach English overseas. During EDUC 230 students will examine how language is acquired and how to best engage English language learners as full participants in subject matter classrooms. Models such as sheltered instruction, bilingual education, and language immersion will be explored. Since Wheaton education licensure majors receive their initial teaching license from the state of Massachusetts, EDUC 230 will follow MA Curriculum Framework for English Language Teaching, integrating state curriculum for ELL and SEI (Sheltered Language Immersion) requirements into course content. In accordance with MA guidelines, the model, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) will be a major focus of study. Attention will also be given to how sociocultural, emotional and economic factors influence English language learners’ educational access to schooling and achievement. Students will be introduced to the Massachusetts Professional Teaching Standards component regarding Teaching All Students.

Faculty: Larry Carpenter

ENG 101: College Writing (morning session)

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

The focus for the writing and reading varies from section to section, permitting students to follow special interests and explore new material. All sections introduce students to some college-level literacy practices. The topic for each of the sections will be announced before the date of course selections and sent to all entering students during the summer. Recent topics have included popular culture, London, multicultural lives, the environment and rebellion and authority.

Faculty: Angie Sarhan Salvatore

ENG 101: Living, Thinking & Writing: How our lives impact our writing

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

These past few years have brought changes into our lives that would be hard to imagine, had we not experienced them ourselves. What many of have not had the time or means to do is reflect on what we’ve experienced, witnessed, or learned. Being in the middle of such intense change often necessitates action, like putting on a mask and staying home, or putting on masks to learn in college classrooms. Yet beneath the masks, who we are and how we have lived—not just since spring 2020—but before these extraordinary pandemic times—reminds us of the person we planned to be, or the person within us that we hoped to discover.

Initially, writing is a private place where you can examine what you know, where you’ve been, and how you have changed. Our brief writing course will include experimental writing by students, experimental in the best way, driven by what you love, what you have turned against, and by what you have come to believe. I will supplement your writing efforts with essays posted on oncourse, with photographs, and with current ideas, all of which you will react to, sometimes instantly, sometimes thoughtfully but always communicating to everyone in the class what you think. Finally, we will examine and discuss our interpretations of the world and how we have experienced them in our separate lives.

Faculty: Connie Campana

FNMS 244 Visualizing Cultural Data

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

This is a project-based, hands-on introductory course for anyone with an interest in data visualization and information design. No prior experience with design, data science, or programming is necessary. Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will use entry-level tools to build visualizations that produce meaningful insights. Projects will include designing an information dashboard, a narrative infographic, an interactive map, and a multi-panel interactive visual story. Students will learn to combine creative, critical, and computational thinking in ways that will strengthen their information fluency and digital literacy skills, skills that are increasingly important to academic success and professional pursuits alike.

Faculty: Josh Stenger

MGMT 198: Business Communications

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Faculty: CC Chapman

MGMT 210: Business & Management Responsibility

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course will examine responsibilities organizations have in the workplace, marketplace, communities, and society-at-large to a variety of entities (e.g., consumers, local communities, employees, shareholders, suppliers and distributors, policymakers, and other stakeholders). Topics will include the examination of principles and conduct related to personal and professional behavior in areas such as international business, human resources, marketing, finance, accounting, leadership, philanthropy, and the environment.

Faculty: Leanna Lawter

MGMT 298: Business Majors Internship for Credit (this course spans Summer Sessions I & II)

Days and Times will be determined based on work schedules

Your internship is an experiential learning opportunity where you can practice the skills and expertise that you have acquired in your classes in a work setting. The internship for academic credit course allows you to grow professionally and personally by using your internship as a platform for developing a deeper understanding of the industry you are working in, set learning objectives for your internship and reflecting on how you have (or have not) accomplished those learning objectives, and getting valuable feedback from your supervisor as part of your learning experience. This course focuses on guiding your learning in your internship in a manner that promotes reflection and furthers your understanding of how our liberal arts and business education are valuable tools in your future career. You should have arranged an internship prior to the start of the course.

Faculty: CC Chapman

MUSC 275: History of Pop Music in the U.S.

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

This course will provide an overall history of popular music in America since the end of the 19th century, with emphasis upon mainstream popular music since 1954. Its focus will be the simultaneous independence and interdependence of black and white musical cultures in America, and how this can help us understand our nation’s history in new and different ways. Students will develop listening skills as they learn about the ways popular music styles and genres have mirrored our nation’s social and cultural history. Topics will include blackface minstrelsy, the blues, jazz, country music, classic Broadway song, rhythm & blues, rock’n’roll, folk music, blues-rock, psychedelic rock, progressive rock, metal, soul, funk, hip-hop, punk, indie-rock, disco, and electronic dance music.

Faculty: Del Case

PHIL 125: Logic

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

An introduction to categorical, propositional and predicate logic with particular emphasis on methods of discovering and proving the validity of arguments. Designed to improve students’ ability to reason clearly and precisely. Analysis of logical equivalence, soundness and the relation of truth to validity.

Faculty: Nancy Kendrick

PSY 298: Practicum in Psychology (register under PSY 003, interview course.  This course spans Summer Sessions I & II)

Wednesdays
2–4:30 p.m.

Faculty: Srijana Shrestha

PSY 233: Lifespan Development

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Examines theory and research on psychological development across the lifespan. We begin with an overview of developmental theories, approaches and research methods. We then explore thematically (e.g., by domain) the development of the individual through five major periods of life: infancy, early childhood, middle childhood and adolescence, emerging and middle adulthood, and old age.

Faculty: Kate Volk

THEA 102: Public Speaking

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Public Speaking will help students achieve greater confidence and expertise as communicators while further developing their unique voice and style. We will examine all aspects of the communication process: how to compose effective, interesting speeches, establish meaningful connections with audiences of any size and utilize the critical art of persuasive speaking. Students will engage in debates, mock interviews, conflict resolution exercises, and deliver various presentations, ranging from informal to formal.  By the end of this course, students will be able to speak with increased ease and deliver engaging, informative presentations to various audiences.

Faculty: Jennifer Madden

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2022 Summer Session II

July 12-August 4, 2022

ANTH 298 Imagining a Just World

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

The work of social justice has been afoot for centuries and yet today the idea of a just world for the majority is still elusive. Where do we begin to change our world? Is making change within ourselves a must? What can we do right now to address injustice? What should we not do? And, at any rate, who even gets to decide what social justice is?

You are invited to learn about different approaches to making social justice change. Together we will interrogate contemporary problems of social justice and learn practical techniques for unassuming engagements with one another. We will study global and local efforts for justice in political representation, gender, judicial processes, and knowledge creation. We will also learn through experience in the practical components of social justice practice. This course will welcome you into a community of learners where you will be expected to work on your outlook and the world in concrete ways!

Faculty: Josh MacLeod

BIO 105: Nutrition

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course focuses on nutrients, their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life, health issues such as diabetes, disordered eating, heart disease, cancer, as well as food safety, food insecurities and genetically modified foods. Students will keep a food journal and analyze their current diet.

Faculty: Susan Barrett

CHEM 198: Forensic Science

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

In this course, students will learn the basics of forensic science, including crime scene investigation, forensic biology (pathology, DNA typing, serology), forensic chemistry (toxicology, illicit drugs, fire, and explosives), and legal aspects of forensic science.

Faculty: Hilary Gaudet

EDUC 111: Ponds to Particles II

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course is a deep dive into the concepts and phenomena built into the Massachusetts K-12 science frameworks. By the end of part I of this course you will know what K-12 students need to learn, how they will need to express that learning, and how to tap into students’ natural curiosity and playfulness to develop effective and engaging lessons. In other words, you’ll learn how to use fun as a teaching tool. While this is a two-semester course, students may take the fall course, the spring course, or both courses. Priority for this course is given to education majors, but it is open to anyone. The successful student in this course will be required to complete tasks that are specific to teaching science, including teaching writing and delivering actual lessons. The fall semester of the course focuses on the physical sciences. The spring semester of this course focuses on the environmental and life sciences. Elementary/Early-Childhood Education majors are strongly advised to take both semesters of this course.

Faculty: Rob LoPiccolo

MUSC 113: Introduction to Music Theory

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Designed for non-music majors or students with little music theory background who wish to gain experience with the fundamental concepts of music notation, scale forms, intervals, triads and rhythmic structures. Includes individual computer-assisted instruction.

Faculty: William Mason

MUSC 298: Soundscapes: Music in Nature/Nature in Music

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This active course explores the myriad ways nature and music are connected. The class will study works that have been inspired by, or evoke a connection to, themes from nature.

Faculty: William Riley

PSY 101: Introductory Psychology

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

A survey of the basic principles and findings of psychology as a social and biological science and practice.

Faculty: Donna Demanarig

PSY 211: Learning and Memory

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

A study of memory from behavioral, cognitive and biological perspectives. Reviews principles of classical and operant conditioning as they have been established through animal research and applied in behavior therapy and takes a cognitive approach to human memory, with an emphasis on information-processing theories.

Faculty: Kathleen Morgan

REL 235: Mental, Physical & Spiritual Well-Being

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course addresses different ways humans define mental, physical, and spiritual health, that is, “well-being,” and the strategies they offer to achieve it. The course recognizes, but does not privilege biomedical views of mental and physical health, though by no means do we discourage those seeking help from medical and psychological professionals for their clinically diagnosed physical and mental health needs. The course begins with an introduction to “the science of alternative medicine” (M. Warner) to clarify the difference between biomedical and alternative healing and to see what “science has to say” about the efficacy of alternative forms of healing, and a case study of the clash between the two in A. Fadiman’s account of a Hmong immigrant girl with epilepsy. Then conventionally “religious” understandings and practices of “well-being,” for example, rest (e.g., Sabbath), reflection (meditation), ritual (e.g., voodoo [Z. N. Hurston], Jewish mystical “tikkunim”[L. Fine], relationships with human and other than human beings (charismatic healers, Christian conversations with God [T. Luhrmann], sex [a.m. brown]), diet, sacred places (gardens, temples, etc.), music, lernen (study for its own sake, not for grades), pleasure, and “belief” itself, among others will be examined. Complementing the assigned readings will be outside of class “labs” to engage in the particular kinds of well-being practices (temporary “sabbath”-like abstention from work, electronic devices), abstentions from certain kinds foods, meditation, etc.), albeit adapted in forms appropriate for a non-denominational secular liberal arts college.

Faculty: Jonnathan Brumberg-Kraus

THEA 102: Public Speaking

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
2–4:30 p.m.

Public Speaking will help students achieve greater confidence and expertise as communicators while further developing their unique voice and style. We will examine all aspects of the communication process: how to compose effective, interesting speeches, establish meaningful connections with audiences of any size and utilize the critical art of persuasive speaking. Students will engage in debates, mock interviews, conflict resolution exercises, and deliver various presentations, ranging from informal to formal.  By the end of this course, students will be able to speak with increased ease and deliver engaging, informative presentations to various audiences.

Faculty: Jennifer Madden

THEA 215: Theater and Social Change

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Challenging plays unearth untellable truths, shed light on systems of injustice, and create empathy and compassion, for ourselves and others. Over the course of 4 weeks, students study contemporary plays that explore subjects related to social and racial injustice.  Reading the plays together, students process and reflect using small group discussions, dialogue training, in class writing assignments, and increase the ability to discuss the issues using different modes of creative and performing arts.

Faculty: Stephanie Daniels

PSY 290/WGS 290: The Psychology of Women

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.–12 p.m.

Examines psychological theories and research about women and gender. Discusses similarities as well as gender differences and the multiple causes for those differences. Explores the ways in which ethnicity, class and sexual orientation interact with gender in the U.S.

Faculty: Lindsay Orchowski

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Courses for Summer Session 2022 are also available on the Course Schedule by selecting “Summer 2022“.