Psychology
Offered by the Psychology department.

Major requirements

Psychology Major Worksheet

The major consists of at least 12 credits:

Two Introductory courses:
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology 1 or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Psychology Exam
PSY 202 Quantitative Research Methods

Statistics
One of the following:
MATH 141 Introductory Statistics
MATH 151 Introduction to Data Science
PSY 141 Statistics for the Social Sciences
SOC 141 Statistics for Social Sciences

Biological Perspective
One of the following:
PSY 225 Brain, Mind and Behavior
PSY 226 Comparative Animal Behavior 3
PSY 227 Drugs and Behavior
PSY 235 Human Sexuality
PSY 265 Health Psychology

Developmental and Clinical Perspectives
One of the following:
PSY 203 Child Development
PSY 224 Child Psychopathology
PSY 233 Lifespan Development
PSY 241 Personality: The Study of Lives 2
PSY 247 Abnormal Psychology 2
PSY 270 Adolescent Development

Cognitive Perspective
One of the following:
PSY 211 Learning and Memory
PSY 222 Cognition
PSY 230 Psychology of Consciousness

Sociocultural Perspective
One of the following:
PSY 232 Social Psychology
PSY 251 Multicultural Psychology 2
PSY 290 Psychology of Women

One of the following 300-level elective courses:
MGMT 320 Organizational Behavior
PSY 312 Perception 2,3
PSY 315 Social and Emotional Development 2,3
PSY 326 Political Psychology 2,3
PSY 328 Psychology and Law 2
PSY 334 Practicum in Human Services and Public Health
PSY 337 Practicum in Psychological Research 2
PSY 361 Behavioral Neuroendocrinology 2,3
PSY 367 Cognitive Neuroscience 2,3
PSY 369 Clinical Psychology 2,3
PSY 370 Moral Development 2

One of the following 300-level lab courses:
PSY 340 Laboratory in Social Psychology 2,3
PSY 341 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience 2,3
PSY 343 Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology 2,3
PSY 344 Laboratory in Qualitative Inquiry 2,3
PSY 345 Laboratory in Child Development 2,3
PSY 348 Laboratory in Animal Communication and Cognition 2,3

Two Elective Courses:
Two courses selected from any psychology offering listed above that are not already being used towards one of the other psychology major requirements.

Seminar
PSY 400 Psychology Senior Seminar

NOTE: No more than two courses that are being used to fulfill the requirements of another academic major may be used to fulfill the requirements of the Psychology Major.


1To declare a major in Psychology, a student must have completed or be currently enrolled in PSY 101.
2Requires completion of PSY 202: Quantitative Research Methods.
3Requires completion of additional course prerequisites (See online Course Schedule for details).

Minor requirements

Psychology minor worksheet

Students in the Class of 2017 and beyond minoring in psychology should take any four courses in psychology, at least one of which must be taken at the 300-level or higher, and PSY 202, Quantitative Research Methods.

  • Psychology

    PSY 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Psychology

    PSY 099 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Psychology

    PSY 101 – Introductory Psychology

    A survey of the basic principles and findings of psychology as a social and biological science and practice.

  • Psychology

    PSY 141 – Statistics for Social Sciences

    This course is intended for students in disciplines that require knowledge of statistical methods used in behavioral and social science research. It is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of probability theory as well as the basic statistical techniques and procedures used by researchers in the social sciences. You will learn how to organize and present data, and how to select, run, and interpret various statistical tests. The course focuses on the use of statistical techniques as tools in the scientific process and will introduce students to SPSS, a common statistical analysis software for the social sciences. You will learn to critically evaluate research conclusions in the social science literature and in the popular press. Finally, you will be prepared to design and conduct quantitative research and clearly communicate your findings and conclusions.

  • Psychology

    PSY 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Psychology

    PSY 199 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Psychology

    PSY 202 – Quantitative Research Methods

    Surveys fundamental principles of quantitative research methodology, including both experimental and correlational methods, as well as basic issues in research ethics. This course is foundational to the departmental program of literacy in psychology and exemplifies infusion of race, ethnicity and gender perspectives into psychology. Majors in psychology and psychobiology are advised to take this course in their sophomore year if possible.

  • Psychology

    PSY 203 – Child Development

    An introduction to concepts and methods for a scientific and ecologically sensitive approach to development, with a primary focus on the multiple influences that create change and continuity, universals and cultural specificity. Development from conception to late childhood is emphasized. Includes observation in the Elizabeth W. Amen Nursery School.

(Previously Developmental Psychology)

  • Psychology

    PSY 211 – Learning and Memory

    A study of memory from behavioral, cognitive and biological perspectives. Reviews principles of classical and operant conditioning as they have been established through animal research and applied in behavior therapy; takes a cognitive approach to human memory, with an emphasis on information-processing theories; and explores recent work in functional brain imaging and with neuropsychological patients.

  • Psychology

    PSY 222 – Cognition

    A survey of scientific studies of everyday thinking, with particular attention to language, problem solving, reasoning and decision making. Serves as an introduction to cognitive neuroscience, which examines information processing in conjunction with its underlying neural mechanisms. Current experimental research will be incorporated into the classroom discussions.

  • Psychology

    PSY 224 – Child Psychopathology

    Examines the common psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence. In addition to studying the nature, symptoms, course, and causes of various pathologies, the treatment for these disorders and various empirically supported interventions are reviewed. A combination of lecture, discussion, demonstration, and application activities are used and emphasis is given to applying information to clinical cases.

  • Psychology

    PSY 225 – Brain, Mind and Behavior

    Replace course description with, “An introduction to biopsychology through a survey of topics that focus on the structure, function, and development of the nervous system as well as how this system produces various behaviors such as sensation and perception, sleep, language, learning, and clinical disorders.

  • Psychology

    PSY 226 – Comparative Animal Behavior

    An introduction to evolutionary theory as an organizing framework for comparing representative behavior patterns in humans and other animal species. Includes analysis of both the mechanisms and the functions of behaviors.

  • Psychology

    PSY 227 – Drugs and Behavior

    An introduction to the study of drug use, abuse and addiction, with a focus on recreationally used drugs. Topics range from the neurochemical action of drugs to the consequences of their use for society.

  • Psychology

    PSY 230 – Psychology of Consciousness

    One of the most fundamental questions human beings face is this: Why are we conscious? How do our minds come to have a subjective awareness of the world? The sense of awareness of the world is a deeply familiar feeling, yet satisfying explanations of why we are conscious and what consciousness is for remain elusive. This course explores the question from a variety of viewpoints, including the philosophical, cognitive, and neuroscientific, introducing a number of perspectives and key ideas from the interdisciplinary field of consciousness studies, with a particular focus on empirical investigation.

  • Psychology

    PSY 232 – Social Psychology

    An introduction to the systematic study of human social behavior. Considers how people perceive and react to others and how they are affected by social situations. Topics include attitudes, prejudice, helping, aggression and interpersonal attraction.

  • Psychology

    PSY 233 – Lifespan Development

    Examines theory and research on psychological development across the lifespan. We begin with an overview of developmental theories, approaches and research methods. We then explore thematically (e.g., by domain) the development of the individual through five major periods of life: infancy, early childhood, middle childhood and adolescence, emerging and middle adulthood, and old age.

Domains of interest include: genetic, physical, cognitive, language, intelligence, social and emotional, moral, and gender and sexual development, with particular attention paid to the social contexts of development across the lifespan.

  • Psychology

    PSY 235 – Human Sexuality

    A comprehensive introduction to the biological, behavioral, psychological and cultural aspects of human sexuality. Considers the relation of sexual values and behavior; anatomy, arousal and response; sexual behavior and orientation; issues of gender; sexuality through the lifespan; sexual problems; and important social issues such as rape, abortion and pornography. Classroom exercises, films and guest presentations.

  • Psychology

    PSY 241 – Personality: The Study of Lives

    A study of the nature of human personality, including its structure, development and ongoing dynamics. Employing a variety of classic and modern theoretical perspectives and research findings, this course addresses the fundamental question of how we are to understand ourselves and others in the diverse situations in which humans find themselves.

  • Psychology

    PSY 247 – Abnormal Psychology

    A survey of the chief forms of psychological disorder and current modes of explanation and treatment. Issues include the definitions of normality and abnormality and the goals of intervention. Case studies focus the discussion.

  • Psychology

    PSY 251 – Multicultural Psychology

    Multicultural psychology is the systematic study of all aspects of human behavior as it occurs in settings where people of different cultural backgrounds encounter each other. Multiculturalism has been considered a “fourth force” in the field of psychology, supplementing behaviorism, psychodynamic theories, and humanistic psychology. Readings, discussions and films will be used in this course to explore such topics as differences in worldviews and in means of communication; the acculturation process; stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination and racism; cultural identity development; and building multicultural competence.

  • Psychology

    PSY 265 – Health Psychology

    Presents a biopsychosocial model of health that addresses how biological, psychological and social processes and their interaction influence our physical well-being. Topics include mind-body interactions, health behavior and interventions, patient-doctor relationships, and chronic and advanced illnesses.

  • Psychology

    PSY 270 – Adolescent Development

    Multiple perspectives on the physical, cognitive and psychosocial transitions related to adolescent development. Topics include current versions of developmental theory; specific issues related to adolescence and emerging adulthood; the adolescent peer culture; sexualities and sex education; multicultural issues in adolescence; and changing male/female roles.

  • Psychology

    PSY 290 – Psychology of Women

    Examines psychological theories and research about women and gender. Discusses similarities as well as gender differences and the multiple causes for those differences. Explores the ways in which ethnicity, class and sexual orientation interact with gender in the U.S.

  • Psychology

    PSY 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Psychology

    PSY 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Psychology

    PSY 312 – Perception

    A detailed look at the processing of visual information, from the moment that photons of light enter our eyes to the experience of seeing the world spread out before us. Topics include depth perception, perspective in art, color, perceptual organization, motion, attention and awareness.

  • Psychology

    PSY 315 – Social and Emotional Development

    The growth in social and emotional functioning that emerges as children physically mature and continually interact with others (e.g., parents, peers, teachers) will be the focus of this course. We will explore topics such as temperament, personality, emotions, attachment, self-development, peer relationships, parenting, cultural identity, bullying and more through a developmental psychological science lens. In addition, current social issues (e.g., social media and social development) pertaining to children and adolescents’ development will be discussed.

  • Psychology

    PSY 326 – Political Psychology

    The study of psychological influences on political thinking and behavior. Personality and politics, intergroup conflict, political cognition and genocide are some of the topics to be considered.

  • Psychology

    PSY 328 – Psychology and Law

    A critical examination of the relationship between psychology and the law. This seminar will survey the major topics represented in the field of psychology and law, including eyewitness identification, jury decision-making, criminal behavior, criminal and civil forensic assessment, and how psychological research impacts law and public policy. The case law governing and influencing criminal and civil practice, the ethical principles that guide evaluation, report writing, consultation and expert testimony and the social psychological influences on the legal system will be emphasized.

  • Psychology

    PSY 334 – Practicum in Human Services and Public Health

    Students intern in a community mental health or human service agency for one day or two half-days a week. They receive supervision both at the agency and by the professor. The weekly class meeting integrates the fieldwork experience with the theoretical literature. Placements may address issues such as homelessness, family violence, adolescent pregnancy, AIDS, mental illness and child care.

  • Psychology

    PSY 337 – Practicum in Psychological Research

    Students intern in one of several research laboratory settings for six to eight hours a week, receiving supervision by the laboratory manager. A weekly class integrates student experiences with the variety of research methods in psychology and with the theoretical literature. Placements may be in a number research setting, including both on- and off-campus programs.

  • Psychology

    PSY 340 – Laboratory in Social Psychology

    The study of the important conceptual, practical and ethical issues involved in doing social psychological research. Students will conduct studies using experimental and correlational methods and learn to write an APA-style paper.

  • Psychology

    PSY 341 – Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience

    An introduction to the physiology of behavior, with a special focus on neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and sensory physiology. Six hours a week, lab/lecture combined.

  • Psychology

    PSY 343 – Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

    This course is modeled such that students and the instructor work together as a research team in a real cognitive psychology laboratory. The focus is on hands-on opportunities where students participate in landmark experiments, discuss recent discoveries in the field, and develop new research projects. As a lab, we will select several student-designed experiments to conduct by collecting data from recruited participants (what will we find?)

  • Psychology

    PSY 344 – Laboratory in Qualitative Inquiry

    This course emphasizes studying human behavior through a social justice framework. We will explore the philosophical assumptions and interpretative frameworks of qualitative inquiry. Several qualitative approaches will be focused on in this course including the narrative approach, phenomenology, and case study. Students will learn how to develop and conduct qualitative research using interviews, focus groups, and other methods common in psychology.

(Previously Laboratory in Qualitative Research)

  • Psychology

    PSY 345 – Laboratory in Child Development

    Students will address research questions in early childhood development through quantitative or qualitative research methods. Students will design and implement the specific methodologies in the Elizabeth W. Amen Nursery School, analyze the data and interpret the results in written APA format. Ethical issues will be addressed.

  • Psychology

    PSY 348 – Laboratory in Animal Communication and Cognition

    A comparative introduction to current theories and methodologies for investigation of the nature of communication in, and cognitions and problem-solving abilities of, nonhuman animals. Lab/lecture combined.

  • Psychology

    PSY 361 – Behavioral Neuroendocrinology

    A vast number of behaviors crucial for survival are mediated through hormone actions in the brain and the peripheral nervous system. Hormones act on systems throughout the body to initiate fight or flight responses, feeding, reproduction, aggression and parenting behaviors, to name a few. This upper-level seminar will explore the basics of the endocrine system, the interaction between hormones and neurotransmitters, and how hormones shape behaviors across species. Relying on a combination of a central text and current primary literature, this course will provide both broad perspective on the field as well as in-depth focus on student-selected topics.

  • Psychology

    PSY 367 – Cognitive Neuroscience

    An investigation into the field of cognitive neuroscience, which unifies several subdisciplines such as cognitive psychology, neuropsychology and neuroscience in order to understand the biological mechanisms that underlie key components of the human mind such as perception, attention, memory and language.

  • Psychology

    PSY 369 – Clinical Psychology

    An introduction to the field of clinical psychology. Considers the basic tools of the clinician, including interviewing, observation and assessment; the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy; and professional and ethical issues. Case studies, demonstrations and videotapes will be used.

  • Psychology

    PSY 370 – Moral Development

    Examines the major theoretical approaches to moral reasoning and development along with the most current advances in a range of new lines of psychological investigation. Readings and discussion examine the fundamental issues of development, including: how morality is acquired (origins), how it changes over time (sequence), and is expressed throughout the lifespan (ontogenesis), as well as the role of culture and context in moral development. The development of judgments related to human rights, social justice, individual autonomy, as well as resistance and subversion serve as the central topics around which the course is structured.

  • Psychology

    PSY 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Psychology

    PSY 399 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Psychology

    PSY 400 – Psychology Senior Seminar

    Senior psychology majors will participate in a capstone experience in a seminar format. Students will engage in critical thinking about current trends in psychology as well as considering applications of psychological concepts to real-world problems.

  • Psychology

    PSY 401 – Neuroscience Senior Seminar

    The field of neuroscience has been shaped by many diverse disciplines and historic advances in anatomy, perception, histology, and philosophy. By studying the development of any specific field, we learn about the nature of science and human exploration. Therefore, we will also attempt to learn from our past to predict the future of brain science. In this class, we will bring together ideas from psychology, biology, chemistry, physics, philosophy, religion, and mathematics which have all contributed to the discovery of the inner workings of the brain and defining the essence of mind.

  • Psychology

    PSY 499 – Independent Research

    Offered to selected majors at the invitation of the department.

  • Psychology

    PSY 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

Michael Berg

Professor of Psychology; Chair, Psychology Department; Co-Coordinator, Public Health Program

Katherine Eskine

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Peony Fhagen

Associate Professor of Psychology; Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development

Matthew Gingo

Associate Professor of Psychology

Meg Kirkpatrick

Associate Professor of Psychology, Associate Provost

Linette G. Liebling

Visiting Instructor of Psychology

Kathleen Morgan

Associate Professor of Psychology

Bianca Cody Murphy

Professor of Psychology; Coordinator, Wheaton/Royal Thimphu College Partnership Program

Rolf Nelson

Professor of Psychology; Dorothy Reed Williams Professor in the Social Sciences (2015-2020)

Nancy Olin

Visiting Instructor of Psychology

Lindsay Orchowski

Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Christina Riggs Romaine

Associate Professor of Psychology

Gail Sahar

Professor of Psychology

Srijana Shrestha

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Joanna Weaver

Visiting Assistant Professor