Education
Offered by the Education department.

In coursework and field experiences, education majors confront contemporary society, engage in study of race, ethnicity, and social justice, and consider how these issues impact their own lives and the lives of their students.  The intensity of discourse inside and outside the classroom and the active learning promoted by a distinguished faculty prepare future teachers’ understanding of the world and the leadership role they can play in it.  Our graduates pursue many vocations including classroom teachers, administrators, school psychologists, researchers, and professors.

By successfully completing requirements for the secondary, elementary or early childhood education major programs, Wheaton graduates gain Massachusetts teacher licensure. The Education Department also offers a general education minor, a five course non-licensure program.

 

Requirements for Major/Licensure

Described below are the specific requirements for Massachusetts teacher licensure at the early childhood, elementary and secondary levels, as well as departmental requirements for the general minor. All licensure programs are education majors but must be taken as second major only. All students seeking licensure must take and pass the Communication and Literacy sections of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) before the fall of their senior year as a condition for entry into senior level curriculum courses and the practicum. Additionally, students must pass a subject matter test prior to student teaching (Elementary: MTEL General Curriculum; Early Childhood: MTEL Early Childhood; Secondary: appropriate subject area MTEL). Elementary and early childhood licensure majors must also pass the MTEL Foundations of Reading Test before completion of student teaching and graduation.

Students seeking licensure at any level must also undertake at least 40 hours of observation in an educational setting prior to student teaching. A record of this observation will go in the student’s Education Department file.

Finally, students must earn a B- cumulative GPA, at least a B- in EDUC 230 and the curriculum courses, be in good social standing according to the Dean of Students and have no conduct hearings pending, and obtain permission from the department in order to gain admission to the student-teaching practicum. Secondary education majors must have also earned at least a B GPA within their subject area majors.

Early Childhood Education Major: Teachers of Students With and Without Special Needs (Pre-K-Grade 2)

Elementary Education Major (Grades 1-6)

Secondary Education Majors (grades 8-12) (Modern foreign languages: 5-12)

 

 

General Minor in Education

Education minor worksheet

Upon application, a student may be admitted to a general minor in education. Normally this does not include preparation to teach, but rather provides an opportunity to study specific issues and related topics in education. Five courses are required, three of which must be education courses. The remaining two courses need not be within the department, as long as they are appropriately related to the subject of study. One 300-level course is required. Permission of the Education Department faculty is necessary.

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    EDUC 020 – Foundations of Leadership

    An introduction to student development theories, this course is one component of the residence hall staff selection process. Areas addressed will include leadership styles, values clarification and interpersonal skills.

 (Previously Developmental Issues for College Students).

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    EDUC 022 – Intellectual and Social Development

    This course is designed for Sophomore Peer Mentors. Course curriculum includes readings from noted scholars on the developmental stages of second year students specifically related to self-exploration around identity, relationships and decision making relative to the sophomore year experience. Enrolled students will reflect on the curriculum in context with their experience engaging with their mentees through various programmatic venues offered throughout the semester.

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    EDUC 030 – Leadership Models and Practice

    This course explores leadership models and current day practices and helps students apply them directly to personal leadership ideas and experiences on campus and beyond. It aims to assist students in understanding and critiquing how some leadership models can influence leadership in a variety of contexts. Students are challenged to understand both historical and contemporary models, and as a consequence of these models and theories apply them to modern images of leaders and leadership in today’s society. The course culminates with students creating their own model as a capstone of this course through personal reflection, class materials, research and discussion.

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    EDUC 040 – Senior Preceptor Seminar

    The transition to college highlights intellectual and social development in late adolescence and early adulthood. This course, which is only open to Wheaton Senior Preceptors, helps Senior Preceptors develop their leadership skills and create new opportunities for leadership within the Preceptor advising program. Based on their previous advising experience as Preceptors, Senior Preceptors are expected to assume key leadership and program development work such as revising the Program’s annual training in August, in conjunction with the Dean’s Interns and the First-Year Class Dean, help supervise Preceptors in their assigned groups, lead and facilitate ongoing Preceptor training during the academic year. (.5 credit)

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    EDUC 049 – Teaching Assistants’ Seminar

    This course is designed for upper-level students who are teaching assistants in large introductory courses. Through weekly readings and discussions the teaching assistants for each course explore and apply different teaching strategies, discuss issues that arise when working with students and reflect upon various aspects of the college teaching experience.

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    EDUC 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

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    EDUC 099 – Selected Topics

    A course for interested students on aspects of the American educational system, the content and topics of which are determined according to the interests of the students and instructor. This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

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    EDUC 199 – Selected Topics

    A course for interested students on aspects of the American educational system, the content and topics of which are determined according to the interests of the students and instructor. This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

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    EDUC 220 – Introduction to Tutoring Writing

    An introduction to the theory, methods and practice of tutoring in the writing of essays and other college assignments. As peer tutors, students will provide assistance to other students through individual tutoring and perhaps workshops.

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    EDUC 230 – Teaching English Learners

    Teaching English Learners is a required course for all licensure majors. The course explores theories of second language acquisition and program models for English language teaching for students at all levels, preschool to adults. The course prepares Pre-K through grade 12 teachers to meet the needs of non-Native speakers in the classroom, as well as preparing individuals who may want to teach English overseas. During EDUC 230 students will examine how language is acquired and how to best engage English language learners as full participants in subject matter classrooms.

Models such as sheltered instruction, bilingual education, and language immersion will be explored. Since Wheaton education licensure majors receive their initial teaching license from the state of Massachusetts, EDUC 230 will follow MA Curriculum Framework for English Language Teaching, integrating state curriculum for ELL and SEI (Sheltered Language Immersion) requirements into course content. In accordance with MA guidelines, the model, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) will be a major focus of study. Attention will also be given to how sociocultural, emotional and economic factors influence English language learners’ educational access to schooling and achievement. Students will be introduced to the Massachusetts Professional Teaching Standards component regarding Teaching All Students.

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    EDUC 240 – Multiple Perspectives on Literacy

    Multiple Perspectives on Literacy provides a shifting focus on theory and practice, which allows students to conceptualize and reconceptualize the roles of teacher and learner using, as their lens, learners’ literacy development. Sociocultural contexts and the intersection of home, community, and school form the foundation of this field-based course. Students explore critical literacy and discourse theories, the importance of educators’ cultural competence, issues of social justice, exclusion, inclusion, race identity, and school wounds as they impact learning, and reader response and what it means to bring a mindful stance to one’s literate endeavors. Mindfulness, or cultivation of present, nonjudgmental awareness, is central to the course, and students read about, practice and explore ways to teach mindfulness.

During fieldwork, students plan and teach a number of standards-based, reading and writing lessons for elementary learners. Students are introduced to components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers (Curriculum, Planning and Assessment. Teaching All Students, Family and Community Engagement and Professional Culture).

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    EDUC 250 – Schooling in America

    This multidisciplinary course explores the conflicts that have accompanied schooling in a democratic society. Students will study the historical development of public school systems, competing philosophies of education, and current policy debates. Students will consider the purposes of typical school procedures such as testing, tracking, local funding, and (de)segregation. In particular, students will analyze the extent to which class, race, ethnicity, and gender have shaped the evolution of education in the America. The course will encourage students to interrogate multiple perspectives while developing and supporting their own points of view.

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    EDUC 251 – Special Education, Pre K-12

    This course surveys the history of special education in the United States, including national and state special education laws and procedures for identifying and servicing children with special needs. Current special education models and strategies for working with children with special needs in the regular classroom will be examined. Students will become familiar with state and national standards, issues around teacher effectiveness and evaluation, and introduced to components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; and Family and Community Engagement. Field observation opportunities are offered.

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    EDUC 260 – Teaching and Learning

    This course has its focus at the crossroads where theory and educational practice intersect. Through readings, discussions and field experiences, students will examine their beliefs as well as myths and metaphors related to teaching and learning. Students will be introduced to state and national standards, issues around teacher effectiveness and evaluation, and components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; Family and Community Engagement; and Professional Culture. Weekly fieldwork is required.

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    EDUC 270 – Gender and Education

    Gender plays a significant but not always obvious role in the lives of individual students, teachers, and policymakers in American education. Examining both P-12 schools and colleges, this course explores schools as sites for learning and teaching about gender, and as gendered workplaces for teachers and administrators. We explore ways that gender and gender identities affect students’ school experience, both in school culture and in the curriculum (direct instruction and “hidden curriculum”); gender differences in achievement and educational choices; curricular efforts to challenge gender assumptions; ways that teachers enact, construct, and challenge the gendered nature of education; and teaching as a gendered profession. We also investigate Wheaton College as a gendered setting.

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    EDUC 275 – Learning in the Social Sciences

    Learning in the Social Sciences examines the literacy skills needed for social studies reading and writing. Through a dual focus on pedagogy and social studies content, the course explores theoretical perspectives, methods and materials brought to bear on the study of history, geography, economics and civics and government in the elementary classroom. Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for History and Social Science and Common Core Standards frame academic content and skills essential to the study of human experience, past and present. As an integral part of the course, students plan a number of standards-based, social studies lessons as well as a unit of study appropriate for early childhood or elementary-age learners. Students will become familiar with state and national standards, issues around teacher effectiveness and evaluation, and components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers including Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment and Teaching All Students.

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    EDUC 280 – American Higher Education

    This course introduces students to the primary debates over the principles and effectiveness of colleges and universities in the United States. The course focuses on student experiences in terms of purpose, access, equity, and achievement. Major topics include admissions, financial aid, classroom learning, and extracurricular life. The course will draw upon current scholarship, student experiences, and the expertise of Wheaton College administrators. In the process, students will become familiar with a variety of career paths in the field of higher education.

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    EDUC 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

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    EDUC 299 – Selected Topics

    A course for interested students on aspects of the American educational system, the content and topics of which are determined according to the interests of the students and instructor. This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

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    EDUC 350 – Mindfulness in School and Society

    Through scholarly study and experiential learning, EDUC 350 provides an introduction to contemplative studies. Students examine mindfulness and contemplative studies as they engage in such practices and explore connections to teaching, learning, schooling and living. Mindfulness draws on the innate wisdom of our minds and bodies to develop calm, concentration, and insight, and to foster personal growth.

EDUC 350 is open to all students and may serve as one of two education foundations courses for the education major as well as a 300-level course in the contemplative studies minor.

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    EDUC 375 – Issues in Early Care and Education

    This course examines complex issues determining and affecting the quality of early care and education for young children. Current research related to notions of childhood, learning through guided play, social-emotional indicators, diverse family structures, the early childhood workforce and industry and state/ national/ and international policies will be explored. Components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers will be discussed: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; Family and Community Engagement; and Professional Culture. Students choose among several options for off-site observations.

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    EDUC 385 – Teaching Math and Science

    This course is designed for students to develop practical understandings of how children learn, pedagogical strategies, and the design of the learning environment in early childhood and elementary education settings (grades PreK-6) for effective mathematics and science teaching. It is the first of two required curriculum courses. Working with MA Curriculum Frameworks/ Common Core State Standards, students learn how to plan math and science lessons that address the four components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers: Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment; Teaching All Students; Family and Community Engagement; and Professional Culture. A minimum of 20 hours fieldwork/ prepracticum, scheduled as a lab, is required. It is also required that students complete a series of MTEL test prep sessions.

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    EDUC 390 – Teaching Reading and Language Arts

    Teaching Reading and Language Arts is the second of two required pre-practicum courses for early childhood and elementary licensure majors, who are placed in the same classrooms where they will complete their semester-long practicum during their senior spring. Coursework provides an introduction to reading, writing and related language arts activities in early childhood and elementary education with dual emphasis on the development of an understanding of the reading process and the theories, practices and politics of reading and writing pedagogy. The appropriateness of current curricula, methods and materials will be considered in light of philosophical and practical objectives as well as how practice is shaped and aligned to Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for English and Language Arts and relevant Common Core Standards. The Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers: (Curriculum, Planning and Assessment, Teaching All Students, Family and Community Engagement), are integrated primarily at the practice level (with some opportunities for demonstration) through readings, class discussions, lesson planning, written assignments and field experiences.

Mindfulness, or cultivation of present, nonjudgmental awareness, is a strand of the course, which explores the critical importance of learners’ social emotional development in academic contexts. A minimum of 20 hours of fieldwork, scheduled as a lab is required. Attendance at MTEL prep sessions is also required.

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    EDUC 391 – Secondary School Curriculum

    This fall semester course prepares students to undertake a student-teaching practicum Education 496 – Student Teaching Practicum in the Public Schools (EDUC 496) during the spring semester. In particular, students learn how to demonstrate their understanding of curriculum planning and instruction at the “practice” level for the first two components of the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs): Curriculum, Planning, and Assessment (1) and Teaching All Students (2). Students will also demonstrate their “introductory” level of understanding for several elements of the third and fourth PSTs: Family and Community Engagement (3) and Professional Culture (4). The PSTs are described in detail in the Guidelines for the Professional Standards for Teachers.

By reading, discussing, observing, planning, and practicing, students select research-based pedagogical strategies and begin to develop their own instructional habits. The course includes a 35-hour pre-practicum in which students start to practice these strategies in a local public school classroom.

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    EDUC 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

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    EDUC 399 – Selected Topics

    A course for interested students on aspects of the American educational system, the content and topics of which are determined according to the interests of the students and instructor. This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

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    EDUC 495 – Seminar in Teaching Methods

    The Seminar in Teaching Methods is a series of weekly two-hour seminar sessions using the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers to focus on Curriculum, Planning and Assessment, Teaching All Students, Family and Community Engagement, and Professional Culture. The seminar provides opportunities for reflection, support, sharing, guidance and feedback during student teaching. The seminar must be taken concurrently with Education 496 – Student Teaching Practicum in the Public Schools (EDUC 496). (one credit)

Section 1. Early Childhood

Section 2. Elementary

Section 3. Secondary

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    EDUC 496 – Student Teaching Practicum in the Public Schools

    The practicum is a full-time, full-semester student-teaching experience in which students assume increasing professional responsibility for teaching in a local public school. Students are mentored by supervising practitioners and college supervisors to develop competencies in meeting the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers, including: Curriculum, Planning and Assessment, Teaching All Students, Family and Community Engagement and Professional Culture. Concurrent enrollment in Education 495 – Seminar in Teaching Methods (EDUC 495) is required. By permission of the instructor. (2.5 credits)

Section 1. Early Childhood

Section 2. Elementary

Section 3. Secondary

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    EDUC 499 – Independent Research

    This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

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    EDUC 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

Vicki L. Bartolini

Professor of Education; Chair, Department of Education

Linda Eisenmann

Professor of Education, Professor of History

Scott Gelber

Associate Professor of Education; Associate Professor of History (By Courtesy)

Mary Lee Griffin

Professor of Education; Co-Founder, Wheaton Contemplative Studies Initiative (CSI)

Sally Guadagno

Visiting Instructor of Education

Judy LaConte

Visiting Instructor of Education

Marge Werner

Director, Nursery School