Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

A minute with Christopher MacDonald ’10

Christopher MacDonald '10Christopher MacDonald, a double major in English literature and music, is a man of many talents. He has found a way to showcase an amazing array of them.

A unique voice: “My voice is different from that of most other men. I am a male mezzo-soprano, which means that I have a vocal range that lies about an octave or so higher than that of an average baritone. Not only is this something rare and exciting, but it also allows me to perform repertoire that has been inaccessible to the male voice for years and to make new statements with other repertoire.” Talent show: “I write a political commentary column for the Wheaton Wire, sing in and conduct the Wheaton Chorale, play and take lessons for organ, and study conducting. I am the vice chair of the Appellate Board, and a member of the nonpartisan think tank the Roosevelt Institute, for which I am writing a federal transportation policy proposal. I am a senator in the Student Government Association, as well as the Dean of Senate. This semester, I am working with Public Safety and Student Life to reform Wheaton’s sanctioning system into something more comprehensible. I represent Cragin Hall. I work in the library and as the music department assistant. I have also worked for U.S. Senator Susan Collins since last May. I will move to Washington, D.C., after graduation to work in her office before going to law school.” Harmony between music and politics: “For centuries, music has been inextricably associated with culture—expressing or representing it, or, in some cases, defining it altogether. Historically, musical and political happenings have always shared a reciprocal relationship. There are countless examples of how music and politics intersect. Both are interests that Wheaton has allowed me to develop concurrently. For example, in my music senior seminar, we are examining the role of music in the formation of English national identity. And in a political science class in fall 2009, when we created political campaign ads for ourselves, I was able to experiment with the influence of music in such settings." Q