Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Office of Communications

G-L

G

geographic names, abbreviating: do not abbreviate parts of such names unless they occur in tabular matter.

Fort Wayne, not Ft. Wayne
North Dakota, not N. Dakota
(Exception: St. Louis, St. Paul, etc.)

geographic regions: capitalize recognized regions only. Do not capitalize points of the compass used alone.

She spends her weekends in Northern California.
He moved to northern Idaho.
She traveled in the South, the Midwest and the East.
We are walking northwest.

grade point average or GPA: no hyphen in the former; no periods in the latter.

Wheaton Greenhouse not Greenhouses.

Go Beyond: Campaign for Wheaton is the official name of the college’s comprehensive campaign (FY2006 to FY2014).

H

headlines: use sentence case (capitalize only the first word and any proper nouns).

headlines, quotation marks in: use single quotation marks in newspaper or magazine headlines.

Nixon asserts: ‘I’m not a crook’

hip-hop: hyphenate as noun or adjective.

historic vs. historical: The former refers to things that are historically significant (a historic house). The latter refers to any aspect of the past (Wheaton College has a historical connection with the Trinitarian Church). Also, use the article “a,” not “an,” since the “h” is aspirated.

hours of the day: use figures for hours of the day: 7 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. (not 7:00 p.m., unless used in lists of events, etc., to preserve alignment of type). Use the format a.m. and p.m., not AM and PM.

 

HYPHENATION

1) With prefixes. When using pre, semi, anti, co, sub, etc. do not place a hyphen between the prefix and the noun or adjective.

Exception: proper nouns.

anti-American

Exception: hyphenate to avoid duplicated vowels or triple consonants.

pre-enroll
bell-like

2) To avoid ambiguity. Use a hyphen when necessary to clarify the meaning.

small-business profits = profits made by small businesses
small business profits = business profits that are small

3) With “part-time” and “full-time” or with “well”

Hyphenate part-time and full-time when used as adjectives. Hyphenate any modifying words combined with “well” preceding a noun.

A part-time job, but he works part time
well-built engine, but the machine was well built
well-grounded in mathematics

I

Initials, middle (in names): we do not use the middle initial in Class Notes. In other contexts, it is acceptable to use the middle initial, according to the person’s preference: e.g., President Ronald A. Crutcher.

Internet: uppercase

L

Initials, middle (in names): we do not use the middle initial in Class Notes. In other contexts, it is acceptable to use the middle initial, according to the person’s preference: e.g., President Ronald A. Crutcher.

Internet: uppercase

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