Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Office of the Provost

News

  • Community at the International Level: Exploring the Nexus of Politics and International Law

    Will continued talks between the U.S. and Iran yield a lasting agreement on Iran’s nuclear program? Adam Irish, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in International Relations, presents the final Faculty Lunch Talk of the semester. Thurs., Dec. 5, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    • Will continued talks between the U.S. and Iran yield a lasting agreement on Iran's nuclear program?
    • If they reach a lasting agreement, will it be written as a hard law (a treaty) or a soft law (a memorandum of understanding?)
    • How do international and domestic politics affect which type of law is used to address international dilemmas?

    This talk will review the tradeoffs that states face in deciding whether to use hard or soft law to address international dilemmas. Professor Irish will present an argument for incorporating process concerns when researching the nexus of politics and international law. He will also share his recent work on the politics and timing of treaty ratifications. We will then discuss when states are better off forging hard or soft law, and other policy implications of this research.

    Adam Irish, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Political Science and International Relations, presents the final Faculty Lunch Talk of the semester on Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room. All are welcome to attend.

     

  • Humiliation: An Understudied Self-Conscious Emotion

    The next Faculty Lunch Talk will be presented by Peony Fhagen-Smith, Associate Professor of Psychology. All are welcome. Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    The Adolescent Self Portrait Project was launched in the summer of 2010. The overall goal of this project was to study self-development with the aim of better understanding vulnerabilities during adolescence. Research findings on developmental changes and individual differences in number of conflicts in self-attributes identified opposites will be presented. A secondary goal was to explore the self-conscious emotion humiliation. The importance of and future directions for investigating this understudied self-conscious emotion will be discussed.

    This Faculty Lunch Talk will be presented by Peony Fhagen-Smith, Associate Professor of Psychology and is scheduled for Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome.

    For the complete schedule of Fall, 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

  • The Surprising History of Household Electric Refrigeration

    Betsey Dyer, Prof. of Biology and Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus, Prof. of Religion present this week’s Faculty Lunch Talk on Wed., Nov. 13, 2013 in PDR. All are welcome.

    How did the electric refrigerator become an essential kitchen appliance? How was it decided what foods ought to be refrigerated? What were some unexpected outcomes, not predicted by either home economists or refrigerator manufacturers? These and other questions that you may never have considered before will be considered in this presentation by Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus, Professor of Religion, and Betsey Dyer, Professor of Biology. Be prepared to explain why you choose to keep your butter either in the refrigerator or on the counter.

    The talk is scheduled to be held in PDR on Wednesday, November 13, 2013, at 12:30 p.m.  All are welcome to attend.

    For the complete schedule of Fall, 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

  • Languages, Linguists, and Labeling: The Case of the 'Future' in Cherokee

    Presented by Sylvia Schreiner, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Applied Linguistics. Thurs., Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm in PDR. All are welcome.

    Most linguists have to make use of another researcher's language data at one point or another, including that researcher's glosses into English or another common language. While this data-sharing is crucial for broadening our understanding of how language works, we must be cautious: even seemingly simple decisions about how to translate a word or label a morpheme are deceivingly complex, and are not, in fact, ever fully atheoretical. This talk explores the limits of this approach by looking at the case of Cherokee. Several different constructions in Cherokee have traditionally been called "future tense".

    Sylvia Schreiner, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Applied Linguistics, presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room. All are welcome to attend.

    For the complete schedule of Fall, 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

  • Developing Global Perspectives on Rape in Marriage

    Prof. Gabriela Torres, Anthr., and Prof. Kersti Yllo, Soc., will provide an overview of their efforts to advance research on marital rape in the next Faculty Lunch Talk. Tues., Oct. 29, 2013, 12:30 pm in PDR.
    Read more…

    Professors Torres and Yllo recently brought together an international, interdisciplinary group of scholars to begin to address rape in marriage. Marital rape is a widespread form of violence that remains legal in many countries and culturally condoned in most. Yet, it is the most understudied form of violence against women. The high rates of sexual violence against wives constitute a significant human rights and public health crisis. The continuing legal sanctioning of this form of violence, combined with serious social suffering and health consequences (including its role in the HIV/AIDS pandemic), make marital rape a topic that demands urgent attention. In bringing together social scientists, public health and human rights advocates, and legal scholars for the first international meeting on this issue, we began to address legal and theoretical questions about the complex legal and cultural meanings of marital rape, its consequences for women's health, and the challenges posed by international efforts to criminalize this form of violence and insure justice for perpetrators and victims.

    Professors Torres and Yllo will provide an overview of the issues and detail their efforts to advance research on marital rape. There will be an open discussion following the talk and your particpation is welcome.

    The talk is scheduled for Tuesday, October 29, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.
    Click here for the Fall, 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks schedule.

     

  • The Rite of Spring: Roerich (and Stravinsky's) Russian Pagan Past

    Françoise Rosset, Assoc. Prof. of Russian, presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk. All are welcome. Wed., Oct. 23rd at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    A return look at the infamous 1913 premiere of the Ballets russes' Rite of Spring, this presentation focuses on the conceptual framework shared by Stravinsky, Nijinsky and Roerich. It discusses how their implemented vision of "scenes of pagan Russia," particularly in sets and costumes, produced a "barbaric" whole that drove the Paris audience to riot.

    Françoise Rosset, Associate Professor of Russian, presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room. All are welcome to attend.

    Click here for the Faculty Lunch Talks schedule for Fall 2013 .

     

  • The Importance of Being Subtle

    How do we identify it, and why should it be valuable? Wheaton/Brown Faculty Fellow Alexandra King, Philosophy, presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk. Thurs., Oct. 17, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    We praise art for all kinds of thingsfor being beautiful, striking, insightful, and not least of all, we praise it for being subtle. But what is subtlety? How do we identify it, and why should it be valuable?

    Alexandra King, Wheaton/Brown Faculty Fellow in Philosophy, will present answers to these questions and offer her thoughts on why subtleties outside of the artistic sphere might be valuable too.
    The talk is scheduled for Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  All are welcome to attend.

    For the complete schedule of Fall, 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

     

  • Life in the Deep Freeze: Ice, Dust, and the Snowball Earth Hypothesis

    Assist. Prof. of Physics and Astronomy, Jason Goodman presents the first Faculty Lunch Talk of the semester. All are welcome: Thurs., Oct. 10, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in P.D.R.

    Just before the dawn of complex life on Earth, the planet experienced two episodes of freezing climate, more extreme than any ice age since. The "Snowball Earth" hypothesis proposes that during this time, the entire planet froze over completely, with glaciers on the equator and the oceans frozen over from pole to pole. Did this actually occur? If so, how did ice, ocean, and atmosphere interact to shape the planet's climate? Dirt and dust make snowy surfaces on the modern-day Earth darker so they absorb more sunlight: did dust contamination during the Snowball Earth episodes play an important role in determining the Earth's climate fate? What lessons does this ancient climate system provide for the modern Earth's future?

    Thursday's Faculty Lunch Talk will be presented by Jason Goodman, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy.  The talk is scheduled for Thursday, October 10, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.

    For the Fall 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks schedule, click here.

     

  • Photo of blackboard Wheaton means business

    On March 1st, Wheaton established a new major in business and management. The new major draws upon the breadth and depth of the college’s liberal arts curriculum and its commitment to experiential learning to prepare students as future organizational leaders.

  • "Testing the Limits of Executive Power: A Moot Court on The 4th Amendment and War Powers"

    Please join the Wheaton Community for a “moot court” presentation in recognition of Constitution Day. Thurs., Sept. 19th, 7:00 p.m., Holman Rm.

    What are the limits of Presidential power in combating the "war on terror"?  Can the President order the indefinite detention of an American citizen?  How do our constitutional rights adapt to protect our increasingly dependent relationship with technology?  Can the government track our location via our cell phones without a warrant?

    Please join Honorable Stephen Ostrach and Professors Adam Irish and Jenna Lukasik-Wechsler for a "moot court" session, and discussion in honor of Constitution Day 2013.

    Thursday, September 19, 2013
    7:00 PM
    Holman Room

    Contact Susan Colson (x3491) for additional information.