Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Philosophy

News

  • Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 8.27.45 AM This Is What We Look Like

    Jessica Gordon-Roth, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at CUNY Lehman and Wheaton alumna ’03, has started a campaign to “change the way we think about women and work.” The tumblr page she and her friend, a pediatric anesthesiologist, started be found by clicking the headline.

    Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 8.27.45 AMJessica Gordon-Roth, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at CUNY Lehman and Wheaton alumna '03, has started a campaign to "change the way we think about women and work."  The tumblr page she and her friend, a pediatric anesthesiologist, started be found by clicking the links below.

     

    To see Jess's page, go to http://thisiswhatwelooklikecampaign.tumblr.com/.  Want to be a part of the campaign?  Order your "This is what a philosopher looks like" t-shirt and submit a photograph.

  • The Epistemology of Debunking Arguments

    The Philosophy Department hosted the final colloquium of the semester on Thursday, Mar. 26, 5-6:30, Knapton 214. Carry Osborne, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Illinois (and Wheaton alumnus, ’11) gave a talk entitled “The Epistemology of Debunking Arguments.” 

    The Philosophy Department hosted the final colloquium of the semester on Thursday, Mar. 26, 5-6:30, Knapton 214. Carry Osborne, Ph.D. candidate at the University of Illinois (and Wheaton alumnus, '11) gave a talk entitled "The Epistemology of Debunking Arguments." IMG_4439

  • Professor Kendrick's Prize-winning Essay on Berkeley

    Professor Kendrick’s essay, “The ‘Empty Amusement’ of Willing: Berkeley on Agent Causation,” has won the Colin and Ailsa Turbayne International Berkeley Essay Prize. The prize is awarded every two years by the philosophy department at the University of Rochester, where Professor Colin Turbayne, a Berkeley scholar and well-loved teacher, spent most of his career. A copy of Professor Kendrick’s essay will be sent to the Library Study Center at Whitehall, Berkeley’s 18th century home near Newport, Rhode Island. The award comes with a $2,000 prize.

    Professor Kendrick's essay, “The ‘Empty Amusement’ of Willing: Berkeley on Agent Causation,” has won the Colin and Ailsa Turbayne International Berkeley Essay Prize. The prize is awarded every two years by the philosophy department at the University of Rochester, where Professor Colin Turbayne, a Berkeley scholar and well-loved teacher, spent most of his career. A copy of Professor Kendrick's essay will be sent to the Library Study Center at Whitehall, Berkeley's 18th century home near Newport, Rhode Island. The award comes with a $2,000 prize.

  • Does Happiness Make For a Good Life?

    Several Wheaton philosophers pondered this question recently at Brown University, where Daniel Haybron gave a talk with that question as its title on Friday, March 6th. Professors Celada and Partridge, as well as retired Professor Roz Ladd, also attended his talk on Saturday, March 7th, entitled “Measures of Well-Being for Policy: What Do We Want?”

    Several Wheaton philosophers pondered this question recently at Brown University, where Daniel Haybron gave a talk with that question as its title on Friday, March 6th.  Professors Celada and Partridge, as well as retired Professor Roz Ladd, also attended his talk on Saturday, March 7th, entitled "Measures of Well-Being for Policy: What Do We Want?"  The talks were sponsored by Brown's Ethical Inquiry program.  IMG_4409

  • Flash Seminar on Consent

    Associate Professor Stephen Mathis offered a Flash Seminar sponsored by the Education Council of SGA last Wednesday, March 4th.  It was entitled “Comparing Affirmative Consent in Sexual Misconduct Policy to Consent in Contract Law.”

    Associate Professor Stephen Mathis offered a Flash Seminar sponsored by the Education Council of SGA last Wednesday, March 4th.  It was entitled "Comparing Affirmative Consent in Sexual Misconduct Policy to Consent in Contract Law."

  • The Philosophy of Pain

    Professor Brendan O’Sullivan (Stonehill College) presented a paper entitled “Where Does It Hurt? Tensions in Our Concept of Pain” as part of the Philosophy Department’s Colloquium on Feb. 26th. He showed how our ordinary judgments about pain incompatible between two fundamental views (that pains are literally in or on the body, and that they are subjective). [Read more]

    Associate Professor Brendan O'Sullivan (Stonehill College) presented a paper entitled "Where Does It Hurt?--Tensions in Our Concept of Pain" as part of the Philosophy Department's Colloquium on Feb. 26th.  He showed how our ordinary judgments about pain are incompatible between two fundamental views (that pains are literally in or on the body, and that they are subjective).  Rather than show that one strand in our commonsense judgments is mistaken, he provided a view that draws from sense-data theory to handle the act-object distinction and mitigate the tensions between the two views.  We are happy to report that no students were harmed during his presentation.

    Screen Shot 2015-02-27 at 11.39.43 AM

  • Phil Majors earn more than Accounting Majors

    A recent report shows that at mid career, philosophy majors earn more than accounting majors.  With a median salary of $84,000, those with philosophy degree also have “higher earnings potential than many other arts and humanities-related fields.”

    A recent report shows that at mid career, philosophy majors earn more than accounting majors.  With a median salary of $84,000, those with philosophy degree also have "higher earnings potential than many other arts and humanities-related fields."

  • How Judges Reason

    Associate Professor Stephen Mathis is profiled in the Wheaton Quarterly (Winter 2015). “Almost as long as I’ve been teaching the course, I’ve had at least one assignment … that asks the students to read the briefs for an undecided case that has been argued in front of the Supreme Court and to use the jurisprudential theories we’ve studied to decide the case themselves. I try to pick interesting cases, and the high-profile ones like the Hobby Lobby case this past spring tend to be good ones to choose.”

    Associate Professor Stephen Mathis is profiled in the Wheaton Quarterly (Winter 2015).

    Almost as long as I’ve been teaching the course, I’ve had at least one assignment ... that asks the students to read the briefs for an undecided case that has been argued in front of the Supreme Court and to use the jurisprudential theories we’ve studied to decide the case themselves. I try to pick interesting cases, and the high-profile ones like the Hobby Lobby case this past spring tend to be good ones to choose.  Screen Shot 2015-01-26 at 10.53.51 AM

  • Be Employable, Study Philosophy

    So says Shannon Rupp, a Vancouver journalist. Some excerpts:
    “In anticipation of fall course schedules, several people have asked what I think someone who wants to be a journalist should study….. I tell people the most useful classes I took were all in philosophy…..[A] smattering of undergrad philosophy classes taught me something applicable to any and every job: clarity of thought. Name me one aspect of your life that doesn’t benefit from being able to think something through clearly.”

    So says Shannon Rupp, a Vancouver journalist.  Some excerpts:

    In anticipation of fall course schedules, several people have asked what I think someone who wants to be a journalist should study..... I tell people the most useful classes I took were all in philosophy.....[A] smattering of undergrad philosophy classes taught me something applicable to any and every job: clarity of thought. Name me one aspect of your life that doesn’t benefit from being able to think something through clearly.

    This is far from the best article touting the benefits of philosophy.  For one it spends too much time denigrating other fields.  But her central point about the value of philosophy is right on the money.

  • A Great Fit at University of Arizona

    Chris Howard ’08 wrote recently with an update on his progress toward the Ph.D. at University of Arizona. He’s visited or presented work at the University of Edinburgh, the University of Sheffield, UC-Boulder, and the Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association. [Click for more]

    IMG_8613 copyChris Howard '08 wrote recently with an update on his progress toward the Ph.D. at University of Arizona.  He's visited or presented work at the University of Edinburgh, the University of Sheffield, UC-Boulder, and the Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association.  In addition, he designed and taught his own course on Neuroethics and has a handful of articles submitted journals.  Of his dissertation, now underway, he writes:

    I’m defending a ‘fittingness-first’ view of normativity, according to which the normative relation of fittingness (the relation in which an attitude or response stands to an object when the object merits or is worthy of that response) is normatively basic, and all other normative properties and relations can be analyzed in terms of this relation. I draw out the implications of my analysis of normativity in terms of the fittingness relation for first-order normative ethics and epistemology and for current debates in the moral responsibility literature.

    Good luck, Chris!  And keep us posted as those articles get published.