Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

History professor looks at year that rocked the world

Professor of History Alex BloomThe world changed in 1968. Professor of History Alex Bloom spent this past fall semester detailing what happened, what it meant at the time, and what it means for us today in his First-Year Seminar (FYS) “1968: The Year the World Exploded.” The course offered students the chance to dive into epochal moments in modern history and discover how events in the late 1960s have helped to shape the world today. An undergraduate himself at the time, Bloom, who has been teaching at Wheaton for 35 years, said the prospect of the 50th anniversary of the events of 1968 inspired him to craft the course as well as start a new book on the topic. The Quarterly editor sat down to talk with him about the course.

Tell me about your area of research.

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Political science professor reflects on patriotism

Wheaton College Professor Gerard HuiskampGerard Huiskamp, professor of political science, teaches courses in comparative politics, political theory and political development that are infused with the sensibilities of political philosophy, especially concerning issues of democracy, inclusion and social justice. Recently, the professor, who has published articles on the micro-politics of patriotism and protest, was interviewed about patriotism for the personal finance website wallethub.com by writer Richie Bernardo as part of a 2015 study about the most and least patriotic states. Huiskamp made some interesting observations about what it means to be a patriot. We have reprinted the interview here. [Read more...]

Uncovering the truth about bullsh*@

Wheaton Professor Matthew GingoAssistant Professor of Psychology Matthew Gingo says he has always enjoyed “people watching” and trying to make sense of what they do. He’s particularly interested in understanding the ways in which people lie and deceive each other. The First-Year Seminar (FYS) he offered last fall for aspiring leaders—from potential senators to football coaches—gave him and his students the perfect opportunity to explore the use of deceptive tactics and to determine how to see through to the truth of what matters. The title in and of itself was enough to intrigue the Quarterly to want to know more—“Cognition in the Wild: The Psychology of Bullsh*t, and Other Deceptive Tactics for Future Senators and CEOs.”

Tell us about what you explored in your FYS.

The course was designed around the idea that with all the information and misinformation that we are inundated with on a daily basis, we need to become discerning consumers of information. And that with the right approach, we could see through the cloud of B.S. that seems to hover over some of our most important issues. We focused on examining deception in a systematic and psychological way. Who lies to whom about what? Why do we lie? What are the telltale signs? When do we think deception is warranted, and why? The students in the class were really motivated, which meant that we got to consider those questions from a number of perspectives—from Kant and Bok, to the most current empirical articles on micro-expressions and cultural subversion. It was pretty cool. [Read more...]

Professor and students examine epidemics

Karen McCormackIn 2014, the largest Ebola epidemic in history affected several countries in West Africa. Coincidentally, before the outbreak became a major media story, Associate Professor of Sociology Karen McCormack was already exploring health and crime epidemics in her First-Year Seminar (FYS) “Epidemics, Contagion and Inequality.” We talked to her about the course.

Tell us about the focus of your FYS and how the idea for it came about.

Over the past decade or so, many social scientists have used the techniques of epidemiology—the study of the determinants of health and the process and patterns of disease transmission—to learn about other social phenomena, like crime or even fashion trends. I’ve been fascinated by this attempt that parallels the work of sociologists to understand how contagion works, and how and why some people (as well as some neighborhoods, communities, and even states and countries) exhibit some degree of immunity from certain conditions. “Epidemics, Contagion and Inequality” allowed me to explore these patterns with students. [Read more...]