Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

Regain control.

Kara GanssleKara Ganssle Pachniuk ’08

  • Director of Nutrition at POP Weight Loss in Old Saybrook, Conn.
  • Psychobiology major

“To regain control after the holidays, give yourself a formal bedtime. Lack of restorative sleep can throw off your schedule as well as affect cravings and hunger.”

“Stay hydrated. Drinking water throughout the day will help with organ function and energy levels, as well as help prevent overeating.”

“Move. Walking around the mall or outlets can count as exercise. The key is to move every day. If you are active, make exercise non-negotiable.” [Read more...]

Reinvent yourself.

Kathryn Sollmann-MARGARET-FOX-PHOTOGRAPHYKathryn Amarante Sollmann ’80

“Just get to ‘next.’ People are often paralyzed when it comes to career decision making because they feel they only have one shot at what they perceive as a monumental, lifelong decision. A career is actually a series of steps—your only responsibility is to make your best move to the next step.”

“Make sure that your career decisions—to switch jobs or leave/re-enter the workforce—are made in the context of long-term financial security, even if you may be in a comfortable position today. No one escapes life’s twists and turns.” [Read more...]

Be happy.

Emily Clement 019Emily Clement ’97

Clement’s five questions to answer to find what makes you happy:

  1. “If you had a magic wand, what would your life look and feel like? Think beyond your current conditions and circumstances.”
  2. “Are your values aligned with where you spend your time and money? Define your core values, and then look at your bank or credit card statement. Perhaps you want to make adjustments.”
  3. “What scares you? We tend to become stagnant because of fear or our sense of deserving. Name and befriend your fears. Lean into your fear and watch your comfort zone expand naturally.”
  4. “Do you want love, affection and attention? Give away freely what you desire for yourself. Give it freely, and without expectation, to those around you.”
  5. “How do you spend your spare time? Spend quality time in silence. Prayer is talking to God, while meditation is listening. If that’s not your jam, then spend quiet time in nature. Answers arrive in silence.”

[Read more...]

Kindness rocks

Community Service Council commits not-so-random acts

The Kindness Rocks Project (above) is outside of the Madeleine Clark Wallace Library; the wooden plaque reads: “Take one if it means something to you. Share one with a friend in need of inspiration or add one to the pile. It’s all about kindness.”

The Kindness Rocks Project (above) is outside of the Madeleine Clark Wallace Library; the wooden plaque reads: “Take one if it means something to you. Share one with a friend in need of inspiration or add one to the pile. It’s all about kindness.”

There are many ways to reach out and help. The members of Wheaton’s Community Service Council are seeking out those opportunities, creating their own and encouraging others to do the same.

One of the council’s recent initiatives is a rock garden near the Madeleine Clark Wallace Library, where the group is cultivating kindness.

The kindness rock garden, beneath a tree, includes a sign instructing those who approach to take one of the rocks, which all have encouraging words painted on them, and give it to someone for inspiration, or bring a rock and leave it for others to share. At Fall Fest in October, the council supplied paint and rocks for the campus community to create rocks to contribute.

“The Kindness Rocks Project was started by a woman on Cape Cod, with a goal of spreading inspiration and motivation to unsuspecting recipients,” said Keaton Schrank ’19, service council president. “There are now kindness rock gardens all over the world. When I ran across this project online, I knew that we had to join in on the movement. So we got our club members to paint rocks at one of our weekly meetings and created a garden here on campus.”

“We were looking to spread kindness and positivity within the Wheaton community in a new kind of way,” she said. “If even one person finds joy from this project or is inspired to complete their own random act of kindness, then we consider it a success.” [Read more...]