Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

My gift. My way.

Irene Castelot Bradford ’79Irene Castelot Bradford ’79

  • Leadership coach and writer
  • Married for 14 years to Bob Bradford; stepmother of two, grandmother of one

“Wheaton remains one of my most precious experiences. As excited as I was to begin my education at Wheaton, I felt lost as I ventured into the world. Wheaton supported me academically and emotionally and helped me build a strong foundation for my life. I learned life skills that inform my coaching men and women seeking to take their leadership skills to the next level. The friends I made at Wheaton are very special to me, and I continue to make new Wheaton friends today. None of this would have been possible without financial aid, and for that I am very grateful. My husband, Bob, and I value education highly and give to Wheaton to fund scholarships for those who are inspired by the college’s mission and need funds to realize their dream. Our current scholarship pledge allows us to meet the students who make up the face of Wheaton today. We will continue our commitment to Wheaton through current scholarships as well as through a legacy from our family trust for future students.”

Your gift. Your way.

Learn how you can give for the future right now.
Call the Office of Gift Planning at 508-286-3459 or visit wheatoncollege.edu/gift-planning.

Multiply possibility.

James Eberhart ’03James Eberhart ’03 

  • Mathematics teacher, Miss Hall’s School, Pittsfield, Mass.
  • Tanglewood/Boston Symphony Orchestra residential assistant
  • Wheaton Fund supporter

Counts on education:

“Wheaton gave me my first chance to stand in front of a classroom as a teaching assistant while I was a student. That led to many other teaching opportunities, including with the Peace Corps in Bulgaria, at boarding schools in Maine and Rhode Island, at the United Nations International School in Manhattan, and to my current school. The college gave me the chance to see the world and my place in it; the confidence to go after the jobs that I want; and the skills and experience to get those positions.”

Adds value:

“As a teacher I have the honor of making a difference in the world every day. The difference I make is in helping to inspire the generations to come and, especially, to help my students discover what they are passionate about and how they can make a positive difference in their world—whether that is within their family, themselves, their community or the entire world.”

Knows support equals success:

“Wheaton has made me the person that I am today and has helped to define and expand my sense of self. As a third-generation Wheatie, I know the importance of keeping the college strong for the success of current and future students. That’s why I contribute to the Wheaton Fund.”


Give opportunity. Support the Wheaton Fund.

Call 800-896-3145 (option 2) or visit wheatoncollege.edu/giving

Uncovering the truth about bullsh*@

Wheaton Professor Matthew GingoAssistant Professor of Psychology Matthew Gingo says he has always enjoyed “people watching” and trying to make sense of what they do. He’s particularly interested in understanding the ways in which people lie and deceive each other. The First-Year Seminar (FYS) he offered last fall for aspiring leaders—from potential senators to football coaches—gave him and his students the perfect opportunity to explore the use of deceptive tactics and to determine how to see through to the truth of what matters. The title in and of itself was enough to intrigue the Quarterly to want to know more—“Cognition in the Wild: The Psychology of Bullsh*t, and Other Deceptive Tactics for Future Senators and CEOs.”

Tell us about what you explored in your FYS.

The course was designed around the idea that with all the information and misinformation that we are inundated with on a daily basis, we need to become discerning consumers of information. And that with the right approach, we could see through the cloud of B.S. that seems to hover over some of our most important issues. We focused on examining deception in a systematic and psychological way. Who lies to whom about what? Why do we lie? What are the telltale signs? When do we think deception is warranted, and why? The students in the class were really motivated, which meant that we got to consider those questions from a number of perspectives—from Kant and Bok, to the most current empirical articles on micro-expressions and cultural subversion. It was pretty cool. [Read more...]

Publications, honors and creative works: Faculty

Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus, professor of religion, acted in and helped compose lyrics for the annual performance of Temple Emanu El’s Purim shpiel in Providence, R.I., in his 18th appearance.

Geoffrey Collins, professor of geology, co-wrote the chapter “Ganymede and Callisto” in the Encyclopedia of the Solar System, which recently won a PROSE Award for the 2015 best book in the cosmology and astronomy category.

Mark LeBlanc, professor of computer science, was presented a $5,000 Google CS Engagement Award, which supports continued course development and integration of instructional materials for increasing student engagement and retention in introductory computer science classes. [Read more...]