Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Office of the Provost

News

  • "Testing the Limits of Executive Power: A Moot Court on The 4th Amendment and War Powers"

    Please join the Wheaton Community for a “moot court” presentation in recognition of Constitution Day. Thurs., Sept. 19th, 7:00 p.m., Holman Rm.

    What are the limits of Presidential power in combating the "war on terror"?  Can the President order the indefinite detention of an American citizen?  How do our constitutional rights adapt to protect our increasingly dependent relationship with technology?  Can the government track our location via our cell phones without a warrant?

    Please join Honorable Stephen Ostrach and Professors Adam Irish and Jenna Lukasik-Wechsler for a "moot court" session, and discussion in honor of Constitution Day 2013.

    Thursday, September 19, 2013
    7:00 PM
    Holman Room

    Contact Susan Colson (x3491) for additional information.

     

  • The schedule for Workshop Week, May 20-24, is now available.

    Click here for a full listing of workshops, organizers, location, dates, and times. Schedule last updated on May 23, 2013.

    Click here for the most up to date listing of workshops, organizers, location, dates, and times. Please note that some room locations have changed.  The schedule posted here reflects any new changes to the workshop schedule.

    Contact Joel Relihan (relihan_joel@wheatoncollege.edu or x3497) for additional information about the workshops.

     

  • The Afterlife of Christian England

    Daniel Loss, Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellow in History, talks about the changing significance of Christianity in England after the Second World War. Thursday, April 25, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    "Secular Europe" is so often a foil for the "religious United States" that the remnants of Christianity in Europe rarely merit notice. But Christianity has not disappeared - even as rates of church attendance and orthodox belief have plummeted, England continues to have a state church and over 70% of respondents to the 2001 UK census described themselves as Christian.
    This talk will explore the changing significance of Christianity in England after the Second World War by tracing the impact of state support of religion, the decline of denominational discord,and the re-emergence of the Church of England as a national institution.In the course of the second half of the twentieth century, Christianity went from being a matter of belief and practice to being understood as a treasured part of England’s cultural heritage to be enjoyed by believers and non-believers alike.

    This week's talk is presented by Daniel Loss, Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellow in History.  The  talk is scheduled for Thursday, April 25, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  For the full schedule of Spring 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

  • The Marcos Romance and the Cultural Center of the Philippines: Melodrama and Philippine Cultural Policy 1965-1986

    Please join Talitha Espiritu, Assistant Professor of English, for the next faculty lunch talk on Tues., April 16 at 12:30 in PDR.

    How does melodrama shape cultural policy? And how does cultural policy generate “melodramatic” political outcomes? In this talk, Talitha Espiritu will revisit the conjugal union and political partnership of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos, and how the melodramatic imaginary of this romance facilitated the founding of the Cultural Center of the Philippines. From this social script, she will trace the two competing rationales of the Marcos regime’s “melodramatic cultural policy”: the normalization of the “folk” into tasteful citizens and the revaluation of the identities and cultural practices of disempowered Filipinos. Espiritu will further explore how the Center’s controversial excesses fed the melodramatic cultural politics of the anti-Marcos opposition.

    The talk will be presented byTalitha Espiritu, Assistant Professor of English and is scheduled for Tuesday,  April 16th at 12:30 p.m. in PDR. For the full schedule of Spring 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

     

     

     

  • A conversation on faculty innovation: the WIIH and other projects

    Liberal Arts Expertise in a Changing World, presented by Yuen-Gen Liang, Assoc. Prof. of Hist. and Touba Ghadessi, Assist. Prof. of Art History, Wed., April 10th at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    A year in the making, the Wheaton Institute for the Interdisciplinary Humanities (WIIH) was inaugurated on April 1, 2013. At a Faculty Lunch Talk, Touba Ghadessi and Gen Liang share what they have learned and discuss the opportunities that are available for faculty interested in getting involved in the WIIH. As part of an inclusive conversation, the lunch talk also seeks to bring colleagues together to discuss the innovative projects they are undertaking; to their share experiences, ideas, and best practices; and to explore these projects' impact for Wheaton's future.

    Wednesday's Faculty Lunch Talk will be presented by Yuen-Gen Liang, Associate Professor of History, and Touba Ghadessi, Assistant Professor of Art History.  The talk is scheduled for Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  For the full schedule of Spring 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

     

  • Man and the Middle Class: The Work and Vision of Henry Strauss

    Heide Solbrig, Visiting Assist. Prof. of Studio Art, presents her documentary film in which she interviews Strauss, an industrial film producer who lived through the Great Depression and WWII. Wed., April 3, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in PDR.

    Man and the Middle Class:  The Work and Vision of Henry Strauss (2010) tells us the story of Henry Strauss, an industrial film producer who lived through the Great Depression and WWII.  Learning from these experiences, Henry's company, Henry Strauss Productions, Inc. produced films and management training films for most of the large corporations in post-war America, including Pan American Airlines, General Electric and AT&T.  In this film, Henry Strauss, now 95, in conversation with filmmaker Heide Solbrig, narrates his experiences in the war and the depression and how these experiences inspired the production of workplace films that educated soldiers returning home from war, newly promoted managers and executives in a new set of authority relations and work identities.  The film asks, if we are going to lose the American middle class, as the television warns, shouldn't we understand the ideas and institutions which shaped it in the first place?  Through conversation, interview, voice-over and historical footage the film narrates how Strauss' films reflected labor management debates critical to the productions of a post-war middle-class in the United States.

    This week's talk is presented by Heide Solbrig, Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art.  Professor Solbrig's talk is scheduled for Wednesday, April 3, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  For the full schedule of Spring 2013 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

     

     

     

  • On the Meaning(s) of 'After': A Unification of Spatial, Temporal, and Aspectual Uses

    Sylvia Reed, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Applied Linguistics presents the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 12:30 pm in PDR.

    It might seem relatively simple to define a word like 'dog' or 'house'--but how do we talk about the meaning of a preposition, like 'after'? In this talk I discuss several uses of 'after' in American and Scottish English, and suggest that, despite their differences, these uses can be unified with an invariant semantics. I further suggest ways in which Imai's (2003) parameters of spatial deixis can be co-opted to better describe and formalize the semantics of prepositions.

    Sylvia L. Reed, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Applied Linguistics presents her talk on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  Click here for the full schedule of Facullty Lunch Talks for Spring 2013.

     

     

  • So Sue Me! A Contrarian's History of College Student Litigation

    Please join Assist. Prof. of Education Scott Gelber at the next faculty lunch talk on Tuesday, March 5th at 12:30 pm in PDR I and II.

    Understandably, college faculty and administrators tend to view aggressive judicial oversight as something of an aberration -- an exception to a more traditional and more respectful relationship between students and colleges, and between colleges and the state. Legal historians have reinforced this perspective by concluding that a spirit of “academic deference” restrained courts from questioning college authorities prior to the 1960s.  This talk suggests that early judicial intervention was not only more common than previously indicated but also inextricably linked to celebrated achievements of student rights and civil rights.

    Professor Gelber's talk is scheduled for Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  For the full schedule of Fall 2012 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here.

     

  • Lessons To Be Learned: Comparing and Contrasting Finnish and U.S. Schools

    Prof. of Education Vicki Bartolini shares results from her study of Finland’s consistent top placement of international educational measures. Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012 in PDR I and II.

    Vicki Bartolini, Professor of Education, will share about her recent trip to Finland to study what makes Finland consistently tops on international educational measures. Discussions will consider teacher preparation, standardized testing, rights of children, and most importantly - RECESS!!


  • Traumatic Border Crossings: the Blagoveshchensk Massacre in History and Memory

    Martin Fromm, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in History will present the next Faculty Lunch Talk on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012 in PDR.

    In the summer of 1900, at the height of the "carving out of China" by Western imperialism and the anti-foreign Boxer Uprising, Russian officers along the Sino-Russian border rounded up several thousand Chinese residents and drowned them in the Amur River. This talk traces the evolution of this event in Chinese, Japanese, and Russian memories from 1900 to the 1980s. How have the meanings associated with this massacre changed over time, and what does this reveal about the emergence of new forms of ethnic, colonial, and nationalist identities in the twentieth century?

    Martin Fromm, Mellon Post-Doctoral Teaching Fellow in History presents a faculty lunch talk on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. in President's Dining Room.  For the full schedule of Fall 2012 Faculty Lunch Talks, click here