Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Philosophy

News

  • Happy World Philosophy Day!

    The third Thursday of every November is World Philosophy Day. Established by UNESCO in 2002, World Philosophy Day’s objective “is to encourage the peoples of the world to share their philosophical heritage and to open their minds to new ideas, as well as to inspire a public debate between intellectuals and civil society on the challenges confronting our society.”

    The third Thursday of every November is World Philosophy Day.  Established by UNESCO in 2002, World Philosophy Day's objective "is to encourage the peoples of the world to share their philosophical heritage and to open their minds to new ideas, as well as to inspire a public debate between intellectuals and civil society on the challenges confronting our society."

    "In celebrating World Philosophy Day, UNESCO reaffirms the power of philosophy to change the world, because it can help us to change ourselves – by giving weight to our indignation before injustice, lucidity to ask the right questions, and conviction to defend human dignity."

    Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO
    Message on World Philosophy Day
    15 November 2012

    http://www.un.org/en/events/philosophyday/

  • Jill Lepore Historian Jill Lepore to Deliver Ruby Lecture, "The Meaning of Life: A History"

    Harvard historian Jill Lepore will deliver this year’s Ruby lecture, “The Meaning of Life: a History” on November 13 in the Hindle auditorium at 7:30 pm.

  • Philosophy Club Speaker, Tuesday 10/16 @ 7 pm

    The Phil Club was delighted to host a speaker on 10/16.  Ian Blaustein at Boston University gave a talk entitled “On Making a Fig in One’s Pocket.”  It took up recent debates on autonomy within moral philosophy and discussed the work of Frankfurt, Korsgaard, and Hegel.

    The Phil Club was delighted to host a speaker on 10/16.  Ian Blaustein at Boston University gave a talk entitled "On Making a Fig in One's Pocket."  It took up recent debates on autonomy within moral philosophy and discussed the work of Frankfurt, Korsgaard, and Hegel.

  • SAMSUNG Schopenhauer and Toni Morrison on happiness

    Students in “What is the Good Life?” an FYS course taught by Professor Partridge, met at the Mars Science Center outdoor classroom on Thursday, September 27. We are finishing up the Happiness unit of the course and were discussing various critics of the idea that happiness is our ultimate goal. Read more after the jump.

    Students in "What is the Good Life?" an FYS course taught by Professor Partridge, met at the Mars Science Center outdoor classroom on Thursday, September 27. We are finishing up the Happiness unit of the course and were discussing various critics of the idea that happiness is our ultimate goal. Schopenhauer, the famous 19th C. German philosopher, argues pessimistically that it is the goal, but that we can't reach it, or can do so only fleetingly. Toni Morrison, the Nobel prize-winning novelist, recently argued in her 2011 Commencement address at Rutgers University that we should aim for something higher, a life of meaning and commitment to social justice. For their part, the students were happy to be outdoors on a beautiful day. (Philosophy alumnae/i take note: Professor Partridge actually held class outdoors!)
    The development of the "What is the Good Life?" course is supported by an Enduring Questions grant administered by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

  • Screen Shot 2012-09-21 at 4.17.01 PM Finding Plato in a Bomb Shelter

    Elana Weiner ’11 recently visited Wheaton and shared this update. “It’s wonderful to be a Philosopher in the desert! After graduation, I decided to spend five months living and studying permaculture on Kibbutz Lotan in the Arava desert of southern Israel. The kibbutz’s library happened to be located in one of the bomb shelters.” See more after the jump.

    Elana Weiner '11 recently visited Wheaton and shared this update.  "It's wonderful to be a Philosopher in the desert! After graduation, I decided to spend five months living and studying permaculture on Kibbutz Lotan in the Arava desert of southern Israel. The kibbutz's library happened to be located in one of the bomb shelters. One day while looking through the books, I found Plato. It's funny how he pops up everywhere. Finding Plato was exactly what I needed. There is nothing like reading the Apology in the backdrop of the Edom Mountains, with sand under your feet, and surrounded by the immediacy of nature."

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Call for Papers: Undergrad Philosophy Conference

    The Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies will host the third Mid-Hudson Valley Undergraduate Philosophy Conference on March 8-9, 2013 at Marist College. Undergraduates are encouraged to submit papers on any topic in philosophy. The keynote address will be given by Alfred Mele. Papers of no more than 3,000 words are due by December 15, 2012. See more after the jump.

    The Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies will host the third Mid-Hudson Valley Undergraduate Philosophy Conference on March 8-9, 2013 at Marist College. Undergraduates are encouraged to submit papers on any topic in philosophy.  The keynote address will be given by Alfred Mele. He is the William H. and Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University, and the director of the Big Questions on Free Will, a four year project on free will funded by the John Templeton Foundation and Florida State University.

    Please send papers of no more than 3,000 words by December 15, 2012. We prefer that papers be sent electronically by attachment in PDF or MS Word format to james.snyder@marist.edu. The conference program will be announced in January.
  • Philosophy Majors rock the GRE

    Among all undergraduate majors, philosophy majors get the highest scores on the Verbal and Analytical Reasoning parts of the GRE. Among Humanities majors, philosophers get the highest scores on the Quantitative part. (See more after the jump)

    Among all undergraduate majors, philosophy majors get the highest scores on the Verbal and Analytical Reasoning parts of the GRE.  Among Humanities majors, philosophers get the highest scores on the Quantitative part.

    Graphic produced by Ty Fagan, Visiting Instructor at Elmhurst College, using information from the Educational Testing Service

    http://philosophy.elmhurst.edu/FacultyStaff/TylerFagan.aspx

    http://www.ets.org/s/gre/pdf/gre_guide_table4.pdf

  • Congratulations, Jessica Gordon-Roth, PhD!

    The Philosophy Department is proud to congratulate Jessica Gordon-Roth ’04 on completing the requirements for a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Jess defended her doctoral dissertation, “Locke on Substance, Mode, and Personal Identity,” on August 24 before a committee comprised of Prof. John Whipple (UIC) and Prof. Margaret Atherton (UW, […]

    The Philosophy Department is proud to congratulate Jessica Gordon-Roth '04 on completing the requirements for a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Jess defended her doctoral dissertation, "Locke on Substance, Mode, and Personal Identity," on August 24 before a committee comprised of Prof. John Whipple (UIC) and Prof. Margaret Atherton (UW, Milwaukee), among others.  Jess is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA.  Way to go, Dr. Gordon-Roth!

  • Getting to Philosophy

    There’s a game you can play called “Getting to Philosophy.”  Go to any wikipedia article.  Then click on the first link in the text not in parenthesis or italics.  Repeat this process with each successive wikipedia article until you end up at the wikipedia entry for Philosophy.  There’s even a wikipedia page discussing it.

    There's a game you can play called "Getting to Philosophy."  Go to any wikipedia article.  Then click on the first link in the text not in parenthesis or italics.  Repeat this process with each successive wikipedia article until you end up at the wikipedia entry for Philosophy.  There's even a wikipedia page discussing it.

  • Prof. Kendrick and Bishop Berkeley

    Prentice Professor of Philosophy Nancy Kendrick gave a keynote address – “Turning Savage Americans into Indian Scholars: Berkeley’s Bermuda Project” – at the New England Colloquium in Early Modern Philosophy held at Harvard University, May 18-20. She presented her paper “Berkeley and The Ladies Library” at the International Berkeley Conference in Montreal, June 1-4.   […]

    Prentice Professor of Philosophy Nancy Kendrick gave a keynote address – “Turning Savage Americans into Indian Scholars: Berkeley’s Bermuda Project” – at the New England Colloquium in Early Modern Philosophy held at Harvard University, May 18-20. She presented her paper “Berkeley and The Ladies Library” at the International Berkeley Conference in Montreal, June 1-4.