Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Art

Academics

events

  • The Geographical Boundaries of Art History: Academia and the Museum

    April 7, 2015
    Kristen Gresh, Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh Assistant Curator of Photographs, and Jen Mergel, Robert L. Beal, Enid L. Beal and Bruce A. Beal Senior Curator of Contemporary Art

    How do curatorial departments, art historical specialities, and the way collections are organized by geography shape the way we study art, and classify the world? Are there practical possibilities for challenging the geographical model for museum exhibitions? Kristen Gresh and Jen Mergel will address these questions as they apply to an exhibition they are currently researching which will explore contemporary art from across Africa and its diaspora, to open at the MFA Boston in Fall 2016.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 6:00 p.m. More »
  • What Does an Art Historian Bring to Contemporary Art, and Vice Versa?

    March 24, 2015
    Martha Lucy, Assistant Professor of Art History, Drexel University; Consulting Curator, Barnes Foundation/Former Associate Curator, Barnes Foundation

    Dr. Lucy is currently preparing “The Order of Things” (an exhibtion at the Barnes, May 16-Aug 3, 2015). The exhibition invites contemporary artists Mark Dion, Judy Pfaff, and Fred Wilson to critically respond to Barnes installation of his collection into “ensembles,” and the narratives of modernist art they construct. She will address how historical analysis intersects with, and differs from, theories of contemporary art and its curation.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 6:00 p.m. More »
  • Contemporary Art: How does it become art history?

    March 17, 2015
    Peter Kalb, Cynthia L. and Theodore S. Berenson Associate Professor of Contemporary Art Dept. of Fine Arts, Brandeis University, Author, Art Since 1980: Charting the Contemporary

    Dr. Kalb will address the ways in which undergraduate art history textbooks are researched, written, and published, within a larger contextual discussion of how contemporary art is taught at the university level. Who is represented by those texts and why? He will also address the ways in which the traditional art history model of the survey is responding and adapting to digital resources and online courses, which are increasingly accompanying, and perhaps eventually replacing, print textbooks. He will also be advising students on best practices.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 6:00 p.m. More »
  • From Diss to MS: How and Why Art History Research Gets Published

    March 3, 2015
    Workshop: Katie Hornstein, Assistant Professor, Modern European Art, Dartmouth College

    Dr Hornstein’s current project Picturing War in France, 1792-1856 focuses on the relationships between visual representations of war, emergent modes of visual production across a range of media, and structures of political power from the French Revolution through the Crimean War. In addition to sharing her scholarship, she will discuss the practical and conceptual stages in transforming dissertation research into peer-reviewed scholarly essays and book publications.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 6:00 p.m. More »
  • Art History on the Move: Interpretation in the Age of Digital Technology

    February 24, 2015
    Sarah Ganz Blythe, Deputy Director for Exhibitions, Education, and Programs, RISD Museum Providence

    Dr Ganz Blythe will discuss the relationships between the display of art and its interpretation in general, and the use of technology at RISD Museum specifically. RISD has developed interpretive methods that invite audiences to engage deeply and expansively with works of art. This includes a new digital platform, Channel. Ganz Blythe will discuss the ways in which that project and others were conceived and executed, with a critical assessment of best practices for technology use to enhance the experience of original works of art.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 6:00 p.m. More »
  • Nestor Gil

    Transmigrating (how what we discover changes who we become) featuring Nestor Gil

    February 16, 2015
    Nestor Gil operates at the crossroads of sculpture, performance, and new media practices. He produces installations, situations, and events that explore a myriad of ideas like journey, borders, dislocation, and interactivity. A graduate of UNC Chapel Hill’s MFA program in studio art, Nestor is an Assistant Professor of Sculpture + Extended Media at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania. He has exhibited and performed internationally.
    Ellison Lecture, Watson Fine Arts, 5:00 p.m. More »