Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

Making a statement: Meaningful design

Go Beyond, Campaign for Wheaton

Frances “Phoebe” Lovejoy Russell ’01

Frances “Phoebe” Lovejoy Russell ’01 and her husband, Peter

Frances “Phoebe” Lovejoy Russell ’01 provided the design expertise for the renovation of the Eliza Wheaton Conference Room in Park Hall. She is the head of Lovejoy Designs and was recently named one of New England Home magazine’s 5 under 40, the short list for the hottest emerging talents in the region. At Wheaton, she majored in psychology, which she credits for helping her work effectively and cooperatively with clients. As an undergraduate, she also rediscovered her passion for design, then studied at the New York School of Interior Design.

Why the project was special: I loved making the trip down from Boston and putting on my professional hat for a place that is so meaningful to me. Utilizing my skills and my love for design, which I have been cultivating since graduating in 2001, was a complete honor.

Form follows function: I wanted people to feel welcome and generous toward a place that I know so many people hold close to their hearts. To achieve a look that would complement all ages, I envisioned how the space may have looked in the 1920s, 1950s, 2000s and beyond. [Read more...]

A successful experiment

Go Beyond, Campaign for Wheaton

Julia Lamenzo Fox ’93

Julia Lamenzo Fox ’93

Julia Lamenzo Fox ’93 spends her days on biomedical research work that didn’t exist when she was a student, yet she credits Wheaton with helping her get there.

“My curiosity was fostered at Wheaton and I got a foundation in science and research that was so strong I’ve been able to be really versatile in the roles I’ve taken,” she said.

That sense of gratitude has inspired Fox to reach back and help current and future students by supporting research opportunities in the biology department.

A career researcher in health and medicine, Fox currently holds the title scientific data curator for Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass. Her job involves organizing and managing experimental results so that researchers are able to access results from work that takes place in labs around the world. [Read more...]

Research feature

Research with a side of adventure

Tropical biology takes students way out into the field

howler monkey

A howler monkey

The screams began before sunrise. And once they started, it was impossible to sleep. In the early morning darkness, the sounds suggested awful things: large beasts, such as dragons, trumpeting in anger. Or perhaps the sounds of war and death.

“The way I describe it is that it sounded like something being killed, or animals killing each other, like in a slow, painful way,” said Samantha Ferguson ’14. “It definitely sounded like death.”

The source of the sound: a troop of aptly named howler monkeys that had taken up residence in a stand of trees sheltering the river station dormitory at La Selva Biological Station. “The first time you hear that sound, every hair on your body stands up,” said Professor of Biology Scott Shumway, who has been visiting the tropics for more than 20 years.

“It’s not like your mother waking you up,” said Francine Camacho ’14. “It’s this screeching and then it hits you: ‘Wow, I’m really sleeping in the rainforest.’” [Read more...]

Native characters

The reef and rainforest ecosystems that students visit in the “Tropical Field Biology” course are incredibly diverse. Professor Scott Shumway offered field notes on a few of the species that students often focus on during the trip:

[Read more...]