Below you will find information about the Workshop Leaders at our 2018 Event held on March 24, 2018.  Check back for information about our next Summit to be held on April 6, 2019.


Jillian AmaralJillian Amaral
Prior to joining Wheaton as the Sciences and Math Liaison, Jillian earned a degree in Biology, with a minor in Chemistry, from Mount Holyoke College. She worked as a molecular and cell biology scientist, in both academic and industry settings. Jillian then earned a MSLIS from Simmons College with a focus on Science reference, and made the transition to Library and Information Sciences, while working in the pharmaceutical industry.
Workshop: Creating 3D images with your smartphone
Have you ever wondered how 3D images are created? Impress your friends with a fun and simple imaging technique and just the camera on your smartphone, Adobe Photoshop on the computers Wheaton’s Imaging Center for Undergraduate Collaboration (the “ICUC”), and the 3D glasses we provide!

 

Amanda Daly BermanAmanda Daly Berman ’03
Dr. Amanda E. Daly Berman (’03) is the first person to graduate from Wheaton College with a degree in Ethnomusicology. She is currently a Visiting Lecturer in the Music and Dance Department at Salem State University. Her research interests include digital social capital, the Cape Breton diaspora in the greater Boston area, medical ethnomusicology, and the music-war-peace continuum.
Workshop: Digital Social Capital in Daily Life
In this workshop, students will learn the basic principles of social capital and will examine the development and impact of digital social capital in everyday life. Students will consider societal shifts and the resulting impacts; best practices for hybrid social capital management will also be addressed.

 

Virginia BirdVirginia Bird, HR Technology Principal Analyst, HRIP, CSM
Virginia Bird has been a practitioner in HR Systems for over 20 years as an administrator of several HR Technology applications and projects covering Benefits and Pension Administration, Payroll, Salary Planning, Executive Compensation, Work Force Planning, Talent Management, Recruiting, HR Reporting/Analytics and HR Compliance. She received her BS in Human Resources Management from Temple University and is an active volunteer with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Information Services and Nursing Informatics Divisions technology related activities geared towards middle school girls.
Workshop: TechShopz in a Box: Inspire Girls to Explore Technology
TechGirlz is a nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing the gender gap in technology occupations, by focusing on girls at the crucial middle school age. We offer free workshops to get girls interested in different kinds of technology, show them varied career options, and connect them with professionals in technology fields. You will experience a typical workshop and also learn how to run one yourself!

 

eNable LowelleNable Lowell
eNable Lowell is an interdisciplinary volunteer group at UMass Lowell that specializes in 3D printing. We design prosthetics and assistive devices for individuals with limb differences and physical disabilities at no cost to the families. We have made hands and other assistive devices for 9 recipients so far. Part of our mission includes educating our school and local community on empathy for recipients, and teaching the design process to encourage a variety of young people to be interested in STEM.
Workshop: 3D Printing and Prosthetics/Assistive Devices
This hands on workshop will be a simulation of what it is like to be on our design team. Attendees will learn more about 3D printing and have the opportunity to create a design for a device based on the needs of a recipient.

 

Carolyn EngCarolyn Eng
Carolyn Eng earned her PhD from Harvard University in 2014 in Human Evolutionary Biology and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. For her PhD, Carolyn examined the role of the human iliotibial band in elastic energy storage during locomotion. She has been a postdoc at Brown University since 2015 where she investigates the role of elastic connective tissues in modulating the mechanics of muscle function. While at Harvard, Carolyn served as a co-chair of the Harvard University Graduate Women in Science and Engineering Mentoring Program for three years and paired female graduate students with female faculty and professionals in their field that served as their mentors. She also mentored young girls through Science Club for Girls (SCG), a program that aims to make science accessible and exciting for elementary age girls.
Workshop: Flex Your Muscles To Explore Their Function
Muscles are the motors of the body and are required for movement. In this workshop, we will learn the basics of muscle contraction and use electronics to “listen” to our muscles contract as we perform a variety of movements.

 

Kate EskineKate Eskine
Professor Eskine is a cognitive neuroscientist whose research explores how music listening affects cognition and brain activity. Currently, she is exploring the effects of preferential music listening on cognitive abilities in people suffering from dementia and examining how music listening improves creativity in college students. Professor Eskine examines the cortical mechanisms associated with music based changes using electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures voltage changes in the active brain.
Workshop: Is your brain or a computer algorithm in control?
In this workshop participants will explore the idea that commercially available mind control devices do not accurately measure brain activation by experimenting with a number of commercially available mind control games and a research grade EEG system. Participants will gain an understanding of how voltage change in the brain is measured and how this information has been harnessed (or not) by the gaming industry.

 

Rebecca HarveyRebecca Harvey ‘08
Rebecca graduated from Wheaton in 2008 with a major in Chemistry. While at Wheaton, Rebecca took advantage of the many opportunities to participate in research both on and off campus that ultimately resulted in her love for academic research. After graduation, Rebecca worked for a non-profit environmental group and continued to foster her love of research while pursuing a Masters in Environmental Science at Plymouth State University and then her PhD in chemistry at the University of Vermont. Rebecca also held a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Purdue University before accepting her current position with the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. Rebecca’s experiences working in non-profits, academia and government agencies give her a unique perspective on applied science and where a degree in STEM can take you.
Workshop: Bugs Don’t Lie, Fish Don’t Care and Chemistry Bares it All
Learn how ambient biomonitoring techniques are being used to assess the quality of our natural resources. Also, try your hand out at water quality sampling from the confines of an inflatable raft.

 

Jessie KnowltonJessie Knowlton
Professor Knowlton is an avian ecologist and conservation biologist. Her research is focused on how birds and other animals respond to human-induced changes in their environment, such as fragmentation and alteration of habitat. Professor Knowlton has been studying bird communities in Latin America for more than 10 years, and her current field sites include southern Mexico and the Ecuadorian Andes.
Workshop:  A day in the life of a field ornithologist: introduction to observing, mist-netting & banding birds
In this workshop participants will learn how ornithologists gain important information about bird populations and communities using visual and auditory surveys and by capturing birds with mist-nets. Participants will see mist-nets in action and learn how ornithologists band birds and take data on the individuals once captured.

 

Toni LoiacanoToni Loiacano
Toni Loiacano is an architect, who specializes in programming and planning science teaching and research laboratories. An active member of EYP’s research team, she manages the STEM initiative.
Workshop: If you build it, they will come: Architecture 101
What is it like to be an architect? Small teams will collaborate with physical models and drawings to develop an ideal “STEM” learning environment. The only limit is your imagination.

 

Yolanda McKivergonYolanda McKivergan, AD, QC
Yolanda is the Associate Director of Quality Control at an interfering RNA (RNAi) pharmaceutical company in Cambridge, MA. She leads a department focused on ensuring the quality of medicines intended for use in patients with rare, liver-expressed diseases such as Amyloidosis, Porphyria, and Hemophilia. Her professional experience includes proteins, small molecules, conjugates, and medical devices at Biogen, ImmunoGen, Biomet Biologics (now Zimmer), and Sanofi-Genzyme. Yolanda studied at Maine Maritime Academy and graduated from the Ocean Studies program with a Bachelor’s of Science and minors in Chemistry and Small Vessel Operations. During her spare time, she loves to practice photography, hang out with her 2 dogs, cook, and read. She is also passionate about volunteering.
Workshop: I took my science classes, now what?
Besides science, what else do you need to be successful in the ‘real world’ as a scientist? The group will attempt to create a unified story from a set of randomly ordered pictures! Each person has pictures but will not be able to show them to their group counterparts. This activity is meant to help develop communication skills, perspective taking, problem solving skills, and critical thinking skills.

 

Ashlan MusanteAshlan Musante ’08
Manager, CMC Project Management, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals
Workshop: I took my science classes, now what?
Besides science, what else do you need to be successful in the ‘real world’ as a scientist? The group will attempt to create a unified story from a set of randomly ordered pictures! Each person has pictures but will not be able to show them to their group counterparts. This activity is meant to help develop communication skills, perspective taking, problem solving skills, and critical thinking skills.

 

Jillian OliverJillian Oliver
Jillian Oliver is currently a graduate student at Brown University, studying Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She is studying the relationship between muscle architecture and mechanics in turkeys, and has worked on research projects involving armadillo and fish biomechanics. During her time at Brown, Jillian has volunteered at local elementary schools teaching science lessons to young students.
Workshop: Flex Your Muscles To Explore Their Function
Muscles are the motors of the body and are required for movement. In this workshop, we will learn the basics of muscle contraction and use electronics to “listen” to our muscles contract as we perform a variety of movements.

 

Judith WhiteJudith S. White, President & Executive Director
Dr. Judith S. White has been President and Executive Director of HERS since June 2005. During the early years of her tenure, the signature HERS Institute was redesigned and expanded to three locations, offering an enhanced curriculum to serve 200 women faculty and administrators annually. She now leads HERS partnership initiatives, including the 2012 and 2014 HERS Summits for Women Presidents and Chancellors; a research collaboration with the Center for Creative Leadership; and most recently a $450K grant from the Henry Luce Foundation for supporting women in STEM Leadership. Before coming to HERS, Dr. White was an administrator and faculty member at Duke University, Dartmouth College, and the University of North Carolina-Greensboro. She has been a Senior Fellow at the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) and served on the board of Re: Gender. She earned her A.B. at Princeton, M.A. at Columbia, and Ph.D. at the University of Virginia. Dr. White is a HERS Bryn Mawr alumna of 1996.
Workshop: HERS Faculty Development