Showing 126-150 of 1344 courses

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 371 – Masculinity and American Art

    In this seminar we will explore the intersection between the United States’ visual culture and its historical constructions of masculinity, seeking to understand the ways gender, race, sexuality, and class have shaped both. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand how artists and critics have presented masculinity and American character — however an age may have defined them — as synonymous, and to examine the ways in which challenge others have challenged this assumption.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 399 – Selected Topics

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 401 – Seminar

    The study of particular periods, special topics or individual artists. A list for the following year is announced each spring. Subjects are chosen to meet the needs and interests of the particular group of art history majors.

Fall 2017

Bodies: Dead or Alive

This seminar explores issues related to the image and display of the human and monstrous body (in particular, the Devil). Key questions follow: Is there a nexus between the representation of humans and devils? At what point does one end and the other begin? To what extent does psychology and physiology determine the fashioning of bodies and how are these perceptions linked to historical, social and cultural differences as a prelude to the creation and performance of one’s identity(ies)? How is appearance tied to essence? Conversely, to what extent do fakes and forgeries miss this essential link?

Finally, how have issues of display and conservation enhanced or detracted from our appreciation of the representation of the body, dead or alive, in situ or in a museum? Methodological perspectives used to inform our discussions will be wide-ranging, including gender studies, reception theory, semiotics, social art history, iconography, problems in connoisseurship/conservation, formal analysis and psychoanalytical theory. Objects will be drawn almost exclusively from Northern Europe, from the Middle Ages through the Early Modern period and into the Nineteenth Century. Media will include manuscripts, sculpture, prints, stained glass, and painting in order to assess the influence of materials on representation and to ground our discussions in the object. The theme for this seminar and its construction was derived from a co-mingling of the many art historical and theoretical interests of each of the senior art history majors enrolled in the course.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 499 – Independent Research

    Offered to selected majors at the invitation of the department.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

  • Astronomy

    AST 099 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Astronomy

    AST 130 – The Universe

    Properties of stars and how they are born and die, black holes, galaxies, quasars and the origin and evolution of the universe. Weekly two-hour laboratories retrace the steps involved in measuring the age and size of the universe, with enrichment laboratories in astronomical photography and observing.

  • Astronomy

    AST 140 – The Solar System

    The processes that shape the surfaces and atmospheres of planets and satellites and how the planets have evolved in different directions. Students will learn how planetary data are gathered and how to interpret those data and will design a mission to address one of the many remaining mysteries of the solar system.

  • Astronomy

    AST 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Astronomy

    AST 202 – Frontiers of Astronomy

    Students will write on topics of their own choosing in modern astronomy, such as neutron stars, black holes, quasars, active galaxies, the Redshift Controversy, the Big Bang and the fate of the universe. Prerequisite: one previous course in astronomy.

  • Astronomy

    AST 250 – Ancient Astronomies

    We will study coordinate systems, celestial navigation, eclipses and the motions of the sun, moon and planets. We will then use this knowledge to view the skies through ancient eyes, especially those of Islamic and Mayan astronomers, and gain insight into these cultures and their shared passion for astronomy.

  • Astronomy

    AST 272 – Introduction to Astrophysics

    In this class we will start exploring the physics behind astronomical phenomena. Why and how do stars shine? How do we find out compositions of stars, nebulae, and galaxies? What is the life cycle of stars? What powers supernovae, quasars, and blazars? We will also discuss unanswered problems like dark matter, dark energy and an accelerating universe.

  • Astronomy

    AST 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Astronomy

    AST 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Astronomy

    AST 302 – Advanced Astrophysics

    Topics will include orbital mechanics: from Kepler to Newton; stellar structure and evolution: from protostars to main sequence stars to degenerate remnants; radiative processes: blackbody, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, and Compton scattering; accretion disks and jets near black holes and neutron stars.

  • Astronomy

    AST 303 – Astrobiology

    Is there life on other planets?  Science has not yet answered this fundamental question.  We can approach an answer by examining current research on the origin of life, habitable environments on other planets, and the cosmic distribution of life’s building blocks.  A multidisciplinary seminar for students from any science background.

  • Astronomy

    AST 305 – Observational Astronomy

    Students will use Wheaton telescopes and our observatory in Australia to carry out independent research projects, such as color imaging, astrometry and photometry of near-earth asteroids, searching for supernovae and determining the light curves of variable stars.

  • Astronomy

    AST 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Astronomy

    AST 399 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Astronomy

    AST 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

  • Biology

    BIO 099 – Selected Topics

    Discussion and research on special aspects of biology such as animal or plant physiology, animal development, ecology, microbiology and genetics; content varies with the interest of students and instructors. Offered at the discretion of the department.

  • Biology

    BIO 101 – An Introduction to Biology

    This course is taught using an issues-oriented approach and includes topics of current interest to today’s society, such as the human genome project, genetic testing, genetically modified foods, the population explosion, nutrition, cancer and biodiversity. This course encourages critical thinking and questioning and teaches you tools that will enable you to evaluate scientific arguments and make appropriate decisions affecting your life and society. This is an introductory, laboratory-based course in biology for non-majors. Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

  • Biology

    BIO 105 – Nutrition

    The course focuses on nutrients and their digestion and metabolism. The application of the fundamentals of nutrition to daily life and health issues such as dieting, exercise, weight control, eating disorders, heart disease, cancer, safety of food additives, genetically modified foods and farming practices. Students will carry out an independent project. Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.

(Previously Biology 205)

  • Biology

    BIO 106 – Human Anatomy

    Biology 106 is a survey course covering basic human anatomy.  The course will cover the structure and function of major organ systems with an emphasis on the skeletal and muscular systems. This course is intended for pre-health students interested in perusing nursing, physical therapy and physician’s assistant programs and students interested in connections.   This course is connected to Studio Art 340 – Figure Drawing and Anatomy (ARTS 340) and Theatre and Dance Studies 140 – Ballet (THEA 140) and each student is required to do a connected project.  This course is three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory exercises per week.  Biology 106 counts as a related course for Biology majors.

(Previously Basic Anatomy and Physiology).