Showing 1301-1325 of 1344 courses

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 255 – Women in Africa

    What contributions have women made to the societies of Africa prior to colonialism? How and why did colonialism affect men and women differently? What are the implications of gender inequality for economic development in Africa today? These questions are considered from ethnographic, autobiographical and fictional accounts. Gender, class and cultural identity will be focal points.

(Previously Gender in Africa)

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 256 – The Ancient Romance

    Stories of lovers destined to be separated and reunited, of pirates and thieves, false death and miraculous revival, of identity lost and found. From Homer’s Odyssey through Daphnis and Chloe and The Ethiopian Tale to utopian and picaresque literature, Petronius’ Satyricon and the historical fantasy The Romance of Alexander the Great.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 260 – Gender Inequality

    See Sociology 260 – Gender Inequality (SOC 260) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 262 – Women and Development

    This course focuses some of the central development problems in the Global South (poverty, hunger, infectious disease, illiteracy) and how our thinking about these issues changed once women were entered into the development equation. The backdrop to the issues we will tackle is the re-organization of the global political economy and the way that different actors in the business of development (international bodies such as the UN and its subsidiaries, national governments, multinational corporations and trade bodies, NGOs and Aid agencies, and the local recipients of aid) understand the fundamental problems causing underdevelopment and the solutions that they affirm. While we will consider the big picture of development from the top down, our key focus will remain on how women and men in the Global South understand and cope with the key development challenges they face in a rapidly changing world.

    (Previously Gender and Development)

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 266 – Gender, Power and the Gods

    See Classics 266/366 – Gender, Power and the Gods (CLAS 266) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 267 – Weimar and Nazi Cinema and Culture

    This course examines the films of the Weimar and Nazi periods and their socio-historical, politico-cultural and aesthetic contexts of production. It covers a wide variety of works from the early beginnings of German cinema to the end of WWII. Each week is thematically structured around one film and several readings, on topics such as “the male gaze,” “mass culture and modernity”, or “fascist aesthetics.”

(Previously Lulu, Lola and Leni: Women of German Cinema)

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 270 – Gender and Education

    Gender plays a significant but not always obvious role in the lives of individual students, teachers, and policymakers in American education. Examining both P-12 schools and colleges, this course explores schools as sites for learning and teaching about gender, and as gendered workplaces for teachers and administrators. We explore ways that gender and gender identities affect students’ school experience, both in school culture and in the curriculum (direct instruction and “hidden curriculum”); gender differences in achievement and educational choices; curricular efforts to challenge gender assumptions; ways that teachers enact, construct, and challenge the gendered nature of education; and teaching as a gendered profession. We also investigate Wheaton College as a gendered setting.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 272 – Romancing the Novel

    See English 272 – Romancing the Novel (ENG 272) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 275 – Disability and Difference

    Disability Studies examines the societal treatment and lived experiences of people with disabilities. While disability is often seen as a deviation from “normal” functioning, it is a near-universal human experience. This class takes a critical approach to disability, asking questions like: To what extent is disability “natural,” and to what extent is it mediated by cultural norms, medicine, and politics? What does disability, in combination with gender, class, race, and age, reveal about power and inequality in society? And how might we work toward a future in which more people can be meaningfully included in the life of our society?

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 284 – Women in Russian Culture

    See Russian and Russian Studies 284 – Women in Russian Culture (RUSS 284) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 290 – The Psychology of Women

    See Psychology 290 – Psychology of Women (PSY 290) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 291 – Sociology of Sexualities

    See Sociology 290 – Sociology of Sexualities (SOC 290) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 301 – Fashion, Sex and the City

    See Italian Studies 310 – Fashion, Sex and the City (ITAS 310) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 310 – Gender and Nation

    See Sociology 310 – Gender and Nation (SOC 310) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 311 – Violence Against Women

    See Anthropology 311 – Violence against Women (ANTH 311) or Sociology 311 – Violence against Women (SOC 311) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 312 – Feminist Theory

    This advanced-level course is designed to explore in depth many of the theoretical frameworks and methodological issues that are touched upon in women’s studies and gender-balanced courses. The course focuses on historical and contemporary writings from a range of perspectives, including liberal feminism, radical feminism, socialist feminism and postmodernism. Special topics such as racism, lesbianism and international women’s issues are also examined.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 315 – Black Feminist Theory

    The class will examine critical and theoretical issues in Black feminism from the 1960s to the present, focusing on the influential contemporary Black feminist intellectual tradition that emerged in the 1970s. From this perspective, students will explore certain themes and topics, such as work, family, politics and community, through reading the writings of Black feminists. We will also study the ways in which women and men have worked together, toward the eradication of race and gender inequality, among other systems of oppression, which have historically subjugated Black women. Although emphasis will be placed on Black feminist traditions in the United States, at the end of the semester we will consider Black feminism in global perspective.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 317 – Queer Theory

    Developed partly in response to the AIDS epidemic and to make sense of the continued marginalization of people who were not heterosexual, queer theory is a field of inquiry aimed at understanding difference and inequality. The central subjects of queer theory are people marginalized due to their gender or sexuality. Queer theory also asks how “queer” can help us understand a broad range of stigmatized differences: as resistance to the “normal.” This course examines both the intellectual roots of queer theory and its branches into areas like transgender studies, disability studies, and more.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 320 – Race, Gender and Poverty

    See Sociology 320 – Race, Gender and Poverty (SOC 320) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 324 – The Eighteenth-Century Novel

    Before the 18th century, novels in English did not exist. By the end of the 18th century, however, many cultural figures worried about the seemingly obsessive novel reading that was going on among young (particularly female) readers. This course will examine what changed between 1700 and 1800 to make the novel the most important genre of English literature. We will explore the novel as a historical and literary phenomenon. We will see the many ways that the novel answered the grand social and cultural questions which dominated the 18th century. What is the difference between men and women? What makes a human life worthwhile? How should I relate to my family and loved ones? What makes a story seem truthful or false? By reading the prose of Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Burney and Austen, we shall find out.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 325 – Early Modern Feminism: Spain and the New World

    See Hispanic Studies 320 – Early Modern Feminism: Spain and the New World (HISP 320) for course description.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 326 – Queer Politics and Hispanisms

    This course will provide a framework to study the historical and theoretical foundations of queer theory and queer activism. We will explore how queer theory problematizes stable identities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures. We will discuss what happens when people challenge or refuse normativized sexuality and gender categories and look at how queer citizens are caught within the processes of nationalism, neocolonialism, globalization and neoliberalism. We will start the semester reading canonical texts by Michel Foucault, Teresa de Lauretis, Eve Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Gayle Rubin, Judith Halberstam or Gloria Anzaldúa that will help us understand the interdisciplinary scholarship that we will explore during the second half of the semester. The second part of the course will address the question of queerness by analyzing literature, film and cultural products focusing primarily on explicit representation of LGBTQ characters and communities in Latin American, Latin@ and Iberian cultures.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 331 – Other Voices, Other Stories: Great Works by Women from France and the Francophone World

    See French 331 – Other Voices, Other Stories: Great Works by Women from France and the Francophone World (FR 331) for course description.