Showing 1251-1275 of 1333 courses

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 205 – Stagecraft

    Examination of the technical challenges encountered in mounting a major production. Backstage procedures, construction techniques, theatre safety, tool operation and maintenance, drafting, materials and supplies. Students will be assigned crew positions in department productions as a practical aspect of their training.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 210 – Introduction to Design

    This class is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the elements and principles of two- and three- dimensional design. Through a combination of lectures, readings, and hands-on projects, students will gain knowledge regarding the elements of design, the principles of composition, and their practical application in visual composition and communication. This knowledge provides the core foundation for work in visual media, both on stage and off.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 211 – Intermediate Acting

    This course takes the acting fundamentals put forth at the beginning level to a critical next step. Students confront the emotionally high stakes of more demanding and more complicated dramatic worlds. The plays of Russian writer Anton Chekhov serve as an important focal point in the class. Limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 215 – Theatre and Social Change

    A course that investigates how theatre can be used to help communities talk about difficult issues regarding race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, economic status, religion and politics. Writers and/or performance artists studied include Anna Deavere Smith, Moises Kaufman, Tony Kushner, Danny Hoch and Suzan-Lori Parks.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 220 – Stage Management

    An introduction to managing the backstage activities and the production process for the performing arts. Topics include: scheduling, time management, communication, paperwork, performing arts organizations and managing artists.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 225 – Stage Makeup

    Every design component in the Theatre is based on a process of making informed choices, and Makeup is no different. This course will provide the foundations for making informed choices regarding stage makeup, and will provide theory and instruction on standard stage makeup applications. Students will explore color theory, facial anatomy, visual research and character analysis to design and execute makeups for specific projects. Projects will include Corrective (Beauty) Makeup, Old Age Makeup, and certain special application techniques as bruising, scarring, bald caps, and Death and Gore Makeup.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 250 – Costume Construction

    This course is an examination of the technical challenges encountered in mounting a fully designed set of costumes for a fully realized stage production. Emphasis will be on hand and machine sewing vocabulary and skills and costume construction techniques. Fabrics and textiles, and some costume history will be covered, as well as equipment operation and maintenance. The course will be used to create costumes for the department’s faculty-directed production. Production responsibilities will be required.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 275 – The History of Western Theatre

    Focus on the evolution of Western drama from ancient to modern times. Diverse theatrical styles, movements and production modes are examined via scripts, research projects and videotapes.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 276 – World Theatre: Global Perspectives

    An overview of various non-Western performance traditions and methodological approaches. The course investigates a wide variety of performances, carnivals and religious rites from Melanesia and Asia (Papua New Guinea, India, Sri Lanka, Japan, China, Korea, Tibet, Java and Bali), the Caribbean, and Africa. Live performance and film complement assigned readings of scripts, theoretical writings and anthropological studies.

Previously:
Non-Western Theatre and Performance
; Asian Theatre and Performance.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 292 – Broadway Bound

    See Music 292 – Broadway Bound (MUSC 310) for course description.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 299 – Selected Topics

    Independent research and/or practicum at the intermediate level monitored by a faculty member.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 302 – Introduction to Lighting Design

    An examination of the fundamental principles of light. The development of original design projects from the perspective of a lighting designer. The skills of a lighting designer: script analysis, drafting, instrument and color selection. Students will be assigned crew positions in department productions as a practical aspect of their training.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 310 – Intermediate Stage Design

    This course builds on the elements and principles of two- and three-dimensional design as they pertain to theatrical design. Students will work intensively on script analysis and visual research to create production concepts for given plays. Working both individually as artists and in collaborative groups, students will develop design materials for scene and costume designs, including hand-drafted construction plans, scale models, painted costume renderings, fabric references, and evocative and period research bibles. The course will emphasize drawing, visual references, and written statements as the primary means of communication between designers and directors. Students wishing to enroll in the course must have taken Introduction to Design or exhibit other evidence of a background in design, visual art, or theatre.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 311 – Intermediate Directing

    This course takes directing fundamentals put forth at the beginning level to a critical next step. Strong emphasis on what is meant by directorial concept, vision or interpretation and how it affects the collaborative work that is theatre. Students direct both original and established scripts.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 320 – Dance Company

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of the aesthetic and performing issues surrounding specific dance idioms–ballet, modern, jazz and others–through the study and performance of selected repertory works. Students receive a half-credit for participation in the Wheaton Dance Company. Limited to four semesters.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 351 – Advanced Acting

    Focus on the proper use and all-too-frequent misuse of “style” in the theatre. The class encounters via readings, games, improvisations and presentations the worlds of Greek and Shakespearean tragedy and absurdist tragicomedy. Students must keep a weekly journal and present at least three scenes. Limited to juniors and seniors.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 399 – Selected Topics

    Independent research and/or practicum at the advanced level monitored by a faculty member.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 471 – Ensemble Experiments

    Development of a theme-based theatre project, including the writing and performance of a script, the design of sets, lights and costumes, and the preparation of effective publicity. This is the Theatre Studies and Dance Department’s senior seminar/capstone experience. Students may petition for an alternative capstone. Limited to senior majors and minors.

Previously THEA 371.

  • Theatre and Dance Studies

    THEA 500 – Individual Research

    Honors thesis work monitored by one or more faculty members.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 099 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 101 – Introduction to Women’s Studies

    This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) and the skills of feminist analysis. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions, and debates in Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Over the course of the semester, you will become familiarized with many of the critical questions and concepts feminist scholars have developed as tools for thinking about gendered experiences. Significant attention will be paid to the issue of representation: how women and men have been represented, and how individuals represent themselves. We will also explore the complex ways in which gender intersects with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Required readings include classic and contemporary WGS texts from a range of disciplines, as well as political documents, personal narratives, literary and visual texts. Through successfully completing this course, students will be better prepared to participate in and contribute effectively to the larger public conversation about the role of gender in culture and society, to apply the critical tools of WGS to their academic, personal, and professional lives, and to take more advanced classes in this field.

  • Women’s and Gender Studies

    WGS 102 – Introduction to LGBT+ Studies

    Sexuality is an important part of human life and society, but despite claims that we were all “born this way,” its meanings and social significance have changed over the course of history. This class offers an introduction to that history, looking at the rise of sexuality-based classifications in law and medicine, the development of sexual identity politics, and the intersections of sexuality with gender, race/ethnicity, and class. We will examine the history of social movements for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and other minority gender/sexuality groups’ rights, and we will ask how that history shapes LGBT+ politics in the U.S. today.