Showing 76-100 of 1344 courses

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 315 – Intaglio Printmaking

    This course introduces the various traditional and contemporary plate-making techniques and the printing process used to create an intaglio print. Students will explore both hand techniques such as drypoint, engraving and mezzotint; as well as etching techniques, including line etching, soft ground, aquatint, and spitbite. Collagraphs and/or Solarplates are also introduced as alternative plate-making methods. Technical aspects of printing include viscosity printing, registration, and edition printing for class portfolio projects. While learning to employ the various intaglio techniques, students explore their creative process, including the discipline of keeping a sketchbook, as they develop and refine concepts and composition in projects that emphasize personal imagery and narratives.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 316 – Arts in Ireland

    Arts in Ireland is a 21-day intensive studio art course. It is designed to provide studio and music majors and minors with an opportunity to develop their artistic vision while living on the west coast of Ireland. This course is taught in association with the Burren College of Art, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 320 – Painting II

    This intermediate course in oil painting continues and expands on the direct painting method of Painting I. Further exploration of painting technique from under- painting and glazing to impasto is done through large and small- scale work following more self-directed themes. Students will investigate abstraction and work from the model concluding with a final three-part series. Slide-illustrated lectures and frequent discussion of student projects support studio work and conceptual development. Prerequisite: Painting I or 2-D Design.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 325 – Lithography

    This course is an introduction to lithography, which is a planographic printmaking medium based on one simple principle – the antipathy of oil and water. Though the course will offer an historical overview of stone and plate lithographic techniques, students will experiment with more environmentally friendly and less toxic contemporary lithographic techniques, creating prints both in black and white and color. At the conclusion of the course, students will have completed an editioned portfolio of works housed in a hand-constructed folio. Technical aspects of printing include color mixing and transparency, registration, and edition printing for class portfolio projects. Students will explore their creative process, including the discipline of keeping a sketchbook, as they develop and refine concepts and composition in projects that emphasize personal imagery and narratives.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 330 – Intermediate Photography

    This is a digital course designed to encourage students to explore and develop their visual perception and a personal point of view. This is a rigorous course, based in Adobe Lightroom and to some degree Photoshop. Students must have a quality digital camera capable of manual control over f-stops and shutter speeds. Students must be willing to fully invest themselves in this course to investigate and express their aesthetic concerns.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 340 – Figure Drawing and Anatomy

    Through a focused study of the model and the human skeleton, students will discover the underlying anatomical structures of bones and muscles that make up the figure. Weekly drawing sessions with the model will be supplemented by studies from anatomical texts covering the major muscle groups at rest and in motion. We will explore ways to represent the character of the pose, foreshortening and proper proportions. We will analyze solid forms, using cross contour and structural lines together with tonal mass to give the figure weight using lights and darks. The final project is a life-size drawing of an anatomical figure in motion. Prerequisite: Drawing I

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 350 – Graphic Design II

    Graphic Design II is the second course in a year-long exploration of the basic principles and practice of graphic design, with an emphasis on the creative process, beginning with critical thinking and a strong problem-solving approach that leads to innovative design solutions. In the context of more comprehensive and real world design problems, including corporate identity systems, packaging design, editorial design and visual advocacy, students learn to expand on the principles of typography and visual imagery, design layout, and computer graphics learned in Graphic Design I.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 360 – Film Production II

    An intensive hands-on film/video production in which students will explore advanced techniques in directing, cinematography, lighting, editing, and sound design. The class will be broken up into teams of four students, who will conceive a story, translate it into visual language, and produce a 10-minute film. This project is supported with a variety of in-class critique sessions, hands-on production challenges, discussions, and film screenings.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 365 – Printmaking Techniques and Approaches

    Printmaking Techniques and Approaches offers an in-depth exploration of select contemporary and traditional printmaking techniques, with a particular focus on innovative approaches and presentation options, such as: print folios and artist books for serial and sequential imagery; one-of-a kind sculptural or mix-media prints; and collaborative group projects. This course emphasizes the development of each student’s personal thematic content. Previous printmaking experience helpful but not required.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 399 – Selected Topics

    This independent study course offers students the opportunity to work in a medium of their choice at an advanced level, with oversight and support of a faculty member. Students must preregister with their independent study advisor after submitting a written statement of intent for approval. It is recommended that all studio art majors take Art 399: Selected Topics in the fall of their senior year to prepare better for the Senior Seminar and Senior Visual Art Majors Exhibition in the spring semester.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 402 – Senior Seminar

    This course is the capstone experience for studio art majors. Senior students are expected to produce a defining body of work in the medium of their choice, which will be exhibited in the Beard and Weil Galleries at the end of the semester. In this semester-long course, students meet once per week for three hours to discuss a variety of topics in preparation for professional practice. Formal critique sessions provide students with feedback on the development of their work as it progresses toward the Senior Visual Art Majors Exhibition.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 499 – Selected Topics

    Offered to selected students at the invitation of the department.

  • Art (Visual)

    ART 500 – Individual Research

    The opportunity to pursue honors is offered to selected seniors by invitation only. At the end of the fall term of the senior year, the Visual Art faculty meets as a group and identifies promising students from the ranks of those taking ART 399: Selected Topics. Those students who show exemplary work are invited to pursue Honors by the department. Faculty legislation requires that honors work must be above and beyond the normal scope of the major. Two courses, Visual Art 399 – Selected Topics (ART 399) and ART 500, will ultimately make up the year-long course of study above and beyond the normal major requirements. Therefore, the student pursuing honors must register spring semester for both ART 500: Honors and Visual Art 402 – Senior Seminar (ART 402): Senior Seminar and expand on the work begun fall semester in ART 399 to produce a body of work at least one and three-fourth times greater than what is required for the Senior Seminar alone. Final requirements include a written thesis and oral defense. The studio art faculty as a whole determines the grade for the ART 500 course and whether honors will be awarded.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 099 – Selected Topics

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 110 – Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art

    This introductory course is meant to give students a survey of the arts in the Italian peninsula from the 13th century to the 18th century. The class will present a variety of works in diverse media made during what is commonly called the Renaissance. We will explore architecture, paintings, and sculptures by analyzing the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which they were produced. At the end of the course, students will be able to discuss early modern Italian art and to understand the particular concepts that drove artistic productions. Students will also learn the foundations of art historical methods and vocabulary; they will deploy these tools to analyze the works examined in class. Though the course is structured around lectures, students are strongly encouraged to bring their own comments and questions to class. No previous knowledge of art history is required.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 120 – Introduction to American Art and Architecture

    An introduction to American art and architecture from the colonial period through the midtwentieth century, this course examines the role visual culture has played in the formation of national identity. Students will consider a wide range of media, seeking to understand how artists, architects, and designers negotiated the rise of urban culture, industrial prosperity, sectional conflict, and the changing politics of race and gender.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 121 – Introduction to Modern Architecture

    In this introductory survey, we will study the evolution of Western architecture from the period of the Enlightenment to the twenty-first century. Examining the technological, political, and social contexts of key works throughout this period, we will consider the ways individual structures and the built environment have reflected modern Westerners’ greatest aspirations as well as their deepest anxieties.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 199 – Selected Topics

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 212 – African Visual Cultures

    This course provides an introduction to the rich, diverse and inspiring world of African art. We will examine the varied ways that African art has shaped and been shaped by the histories and cultural values of different African peoples, both in the past and during the present day. This course will strengthen the student’s ability to critically assess the role of art in Africa for the people who produce and use it, and will provide an understanding of the role of African art in the West for the people who collect, exhibit, view and study it. Topics of study will include social, political, religious, philosophical, gendered and aesthetic practices.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 230 – Introduction to Museum Studies

    This course introduces students to museum history and practice and to theoretical issues in museum studies. Students will explore the ways in which museums and like institutions represent people and cultures and will consider their missions, organizational structure and architecture, their role in the community and the contemporary challenges faced by museum practitioners.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 240 – Art of the Avant-Gardes, 1900-1945: France, Germany, Italy and Russia

    This course examines the artistic avant-gardes in France, Germany, Italy and Russia, during the first half of the 20th century. We study individual artists and their associated movements (Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, Dada, Surrealism, for example) through select themes: appropriations from and critical responses to mass culture and emerging new media, to visual traditions outside of Europe; representations of sexual, racial, and class identity; and the relationships between modernism, nationalism, war, and revolution. Critical analysis of individual works of art, as well as primary texts, especially those by artists and critics articulating ideological theories of art-making and its social and political roles, forms the basis of the course.

  • Art (History)

    ARTH 241 – Northern Renaissance Painting 1400-1550

    The effects of secular patronage on late Gothic painting in France and Flanders (Pucelle, the Limbourg brothers), followed by a thorough analysis of the realistic and mystical currents in northern culture and painting from Jan van Eyck to Hieronymus Bosch; a study of the spread of the Flemish style to Germany and France and the impact of humanism (Dürer, Grünewald, Brueghel).