Showing 26-50 of 1321 courses

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 270 – Psychological Anthropology

    Shamanic cures, ecstatic trance, spirit possession, dream interpretation, identity negotiation and other psychological phenomena that pose challenges for anthropological explanation are examined in order to better understand the relationship between sociocultural context and individual experience and thought. Case studies from diverse cultural settings are bases for exploring contemporary issues and topics in this field.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 275 – Peoples and Cultures of the Himalaya

    The Himalayan region provides extraordinary opportunities for pursuing fascinating issues that interest anthropologists everywhere, including the relationship between ecology and culture, the politics of gender, negotiating ethnic identity, religious diversity and interaction, and globalization. This region is also home to some of the most widely known fantasies about the ideal society, usually called Shangrila. This course uses intimate, detailed portraits of cultures and societies that the best of anthropology provides in order to examine these issues (and fantasies) in Himalayan contexts, while at the same time providing a broad overview of the enormous diversity to be found in the region and the challenges that those who live there share.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 280 – Archaeology of the Southwest

    This course will investigate the prehistory of native people in the American Southwest. Students will discover how, through archaeological theory and method, material culture is used to reconstruct the chronology and way of life in the ancient Southwest, from the arrival of the first humans onto the North American continent to the coming of the Spanish. The course will focus on the three major culture groups and regions of the Southwest – the Ancestral Puebloans (Anasazi), Mogollon, and Hohokam, and will explore how these ancient people managed to adapt to and flourish in some of the harshest environments in North America, and created impressive settlements with unique and complicated social dynamics.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 295 – Peoples and Cultures of South Asia

    Religious and ethnic diversity and conflict, ritual performance and festivity, caste, colonialism, cultural heritage, nationalism and modern struggles over sovereignty and development schemes are all features of South Asia that anthropologists find particularly interesting. This course explores the extraordinary cultural diversity of this region, which extends from the Himalayas to Sri Lanka and Pakistan to Bhutan in order to better understand the differences and commonalities that divide and unite its peoples.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 301 – Seminar in Anthropological Theory

    This seminar provides a selective survey of the past one hundred years of anthropological theory, with a particular focus on the contributions of American, British and French theorists in the development of anthropological paradigms that are now most important in the discipline. These include evolutionary, functionalist, historical particularist, culture and personality, structuralist, symbolic/interpretive, ecological materialist, Marxist world systems, feminist, poststructuralist, practice and postmodernist theory, which will all receive major attention. Readings may include primary theoretical texts, classic and contemporary ethnographies and biographical materials on a number of influential anthropologists.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 302 – Research Methods

    In this seminar, students learn how to develop a testable hypothesis, conduct a review of research literature, define an appropriate sample and employ a range of ethnographic methodologies in one or more research sites. The course culminates in the design of a pilot project and proposal.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 311 – Violence against Women

    This seminar explores the nature of violence against women, focusing on current research on woman battering, rape, child sexual abuse and pornography. Students will compare theoretical approaches and will critically examine empirical research. The impact of race, ethnicity and class on the abuse experience are considered. A major part of the seminar involves original research by students on an issue of their choice. The semester will culminate in a symposium on violence against women organized by seminar members.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 333 – Economic Anthropology

    The seminar explores capitalism and alternative forms of economic organization, challenging students to reconceptualize “economy” as a cultural system. Students compare nonmonetized economic relations in different societies and interactions between economic cores and peripheries. This reconceptualization informs a critical understanding of the implications for participation in the global economic system and its impact on the rest of the world.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 340 – Seminar on Religion in Anthropological Perspective

    In various places throughout the world, people are killing themselves and others in the name of Religion or “religious beliefs.” Attempts to make sense of these and other phenomena (such as trance, fundamentalism and ecstatic worship) that we call religious often reveal deep-seated prejudices and unfounded assumptions. This seminar examines how anthropologists have sought to understand such phenomena from the perspectives of practitioners in order to develop conceptual frameworks that facilitate cross-cultural understanding.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 350 – Gender and Social Organization

    A unified analysis of gender and kinship is considered essential to an understanding of social organization. This course starts from the premise that cultural conceptions of gender are not “natural” categories. In this course we will consider how marriage, family and household organization both reflect and structure cultural definitions of gender and sex-role behavior and the dynamic interaction of public and private domains in the production of culture. We will be comparing small-scale societies to more complex forms (peasant and industrial economies) and we will also consider the differences among those societies that organize descent bilaterally, matrilineally and patrilineally. Seminar participants are responsible for preparing and presenting the readings and conducting two small fieldwork projects.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 357 – Indigenous Religions

    (See Rel 357 for course description.)

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 398 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 399 – Independent Study

    Independent study supervised by a member of the Anthropology Department.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 401 – Senior Seminar

    A semester of directed research in which students explore topics of their own choice through their own original research. Students meet regularly in a seminar setting, which provides a framework in which to discuss the many stages of the research process and offer collaborative support for fellow students pursuing their individual projects. Students will be expected to produce a completed thesis in February as their capstone to the major.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 499 – Independent Research

    Open to majors at the invitation of the department.

  • Anthropology

    ANTH 500 – Individual Research

    Selected majors are invited by the department to pursue individual research in preparation for writing an Honors Thesis.

  • Arabic

    ARBC 101 – Elementary Arabic I

    This course provides the first-time learner with basic knowledge and skills in Arabic.

This is a yearlong beginning course designed for students with no previous study of Arabic. Its goal is to provide an introduction to modern standard Arabic within the cultural context of the Arab world. The course develops the fundamental skills: understanding, speaking, reading, writing and cultural awareness. Four class meetings per week, plus work in the language laboratory and media center.

  • Arabic

    ARBC 102 – Elementary Arabic II

    A continuation of Arabic 101 – Elementary Arabic I (ARBC 101).

  • Arabic

    ARBC 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Arabic

    ARBC 201 – Intermediate Arabic I

    During this course,students will review chapters 1-10 that are in Book I . Get tested on it before going to Book II, Al-Kitaab. Emphasis will be on learning new vocabulary, writing, reading and speaking will be applied in every class. Instructor will teach materials from the textbooks, CDs, DVDs, cultural events and articles, movies and the instructor personal experience as a native speaker. Speaking Arabic will be encouraged at each class.

  • Arabic

    ARBC 202 – Intermediate Arabic II

    A continuation of Arabic 201 – Intermediate Arabic I (ARBC 201).

  • Arabic

    ARBC 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Arabic

    ARBC 299 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.