Showing 1-25 of 39 courses

  • Mathematics

    MATH 098 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 099 – Independent Study

    An opportunity to do independent work in a particular area not included in the regular courses.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 101 – Calculus I

    Calculus is the elegant language developed to model changes in nature and to formally discuss notions of the infinite and the infinitesimal. Topics include techniques of differentiation, the graphical relationship between a function and its derivatives, applications of the derivative, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and integration by u-substitution. No previous experience with calculus is assumed.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 104 – Calculus II

    Calculus II continues the study of integral calculus begun in Calculus I. In addition to the core single variable topics of techniques of integration, applications of the integral, improper integrals, and Taylor series, this course includes the multivariable topics of partial derivatives, optimization of multivariable functions and multiple integrals.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 122 – Math in Art

    This course investigates mathematics in the context of some of its myriad connections with the art and architecture of various cultures past and present. Possible mathematical topics include systems of proportion, the development of the Golden Ratio by the ancient Greeks and its connection to Fibonacci numbers, the geometry of perspective, classifying different symmetries, non-Euclidean geometry and the fourth dimension, tessellations, and fractals.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 123 – The Edge of Reason

    Consciousness has been memorably described as a flashlight trying to illuminate itself. (Perhaps art is the human activity that best understands the surrounding darkness?) The Edge of Reason is the boundary between light and dark: the mathematics at the border between knowing and not-knowing. In this course, we’ll use logic and reason to grapple with ideas and concepts that are literally beyond the reach of human imagination. The Edge of Reason is for anyone interested in understanding the mental models our minds make. While people who enjoy math are encouraged to take the course, the only prerequisites are an open mind, a big mouth and an inquiring spirit. The payoffs are keener analytical abilities, a new way of looking at reality, a penchant for expressing the inexpressible and the ability to tolerate sleep deprivation.

An intertwined co-requisite is Eng 243 taught by Michael Drout at the same time, on alternating days. This is a yearlong course consisting of one class each semester. By taking both semesters, students will attain the QA and AH designations and also fulfill a two-course Connections requirement. However, a student may enroll in only The Edge of Reason.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 125 – The Shape of Space

    The geometry behind objects in everyday life and the shape of our universe will be investigated. Topics include: symmetry, tilings, patterns, planes, spheres, and higher dimensional surfaces. By adopting the perspective of a bug on a surface, different geometries will be experienced, allowing the students to consider the shape of our universe.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 126 – Math and Pop Culture

    Introduces mathematical ideas, by first seeing them mentioned, or used, in a script/text. Examples: Proof, by David Auburn; Breaking the Code, by Hugh Whitemore; Arcadia, by Tom Stoppard; The Simpsons and Numb3rs. Each work at least mentions mathematics, some even provide details. In most cases, the work is not really about, nor does the story depend on, the mathematics. In other cases, the mathematics is crucial to the story. We take the mathematical ideas and learn about the mathematical details, understand them for their own sake and how the ideas fit the original work. Mathematical topics: proof, cryptography, number theory, probability/data analysis. Satisfies QA requirement. No prerequisites.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 127 – Colorful Mathematics

    The mathematics behind coloring, drawing and design will be investigated and the art of coloring, drawing and design will aid in the study of other math topics. Topics include: African unicursal tracings, coloring maps, coloring graphs, symmetry, border patterns and tessellations.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 133 – Concepts of Mathematics

    Required of early childhood and elementary education majors. Mathematical topics that appear in everyday life, with emphasis on problem solving and logical reasoning. Topics include ratios and proportion, alternate bases, number theory, geometry, graph theory and probability.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 141 – Introductory Statistics

    An introduction to the language, methods and applications of Statistics. Data from numerous fields are used to show the many uses of basic statistical practice, with use of statistical software. Topics include: data summary, graphical techniques, elementary probability, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, inferential procedures such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means and proportions, chi-square test, simple and multiple linear regression, and analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  • Mathematics

    MATH 151 – Accelerated Statistics

    An introduction to the language, methods, theory and applications of Statistics. Data from numerous fields are used to show the many uses of basic statistical practice. Includes an introduction to R for basic computer programming, though no prior programming required. Topics include: data summary, graphical techniques, elementary probability, sampling distributions, central limit theorem, inferential procedures such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means and proportions, chi-square test, simple and multiple linear regression, and one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  • Mathematics

    MATH 198 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 199 – Independent Study

    An individual or small-group study in mathematics under the direction of an approved advisor. An individual or small group intensively studies a subfield of mathematics not normally taught. An independent study provides an opportunity to go beyond the usual undergraduate curriculum and deeply explore and engage an area of interest. Students are also expected to assume a greater responsibility, in the form of leading discussions and working examples.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 202 – Cryptography

    We live in an ocean of information and secrets, surrounded by codes and ciphers. Actions as prosaic as making a call on a cellphone, logging onto a computer, purchasing an item over the Internet, inserting an ATM card at the bank or using a satellite dish for TV reception all involve the digitizing and encrypting of information. Companies with proprietary data and countries with classified information: all kinds of organizations need a way to encode and decrypt their secrets to keep them hidden from prying eyes. This course will develop from scratch the theoretical mathematics necessary to understand current sophisticated crypto-systems, such as the government, industry and Internet standards: the public-key RSA, the DES and the Rijndael codes.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 211 – Discrete Mathematics

    Combining the iron rules of logic with an artist’s sensitivity is part of the aesthetics of a mathematical proof. Discrete mathematics is the first course that asks students to create their own rigorous proofs of mathematical truths. Relations and functions, sets, Boolean algebra, combinatorics, graph theory and algorithms are the raw items used to develop this skill.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 212 – Differential Equations

    Since the time of Newton, some physical processes of the universe have been accurately modeled by differential equations. Recent advances in mathematics and the invention of computers have allowed the extension of these ideas to complex and chaotic systems. This course uses qualitative, analytic and numeric approaches to understand the long-term behavior of the mathematical models given by differential equations.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 217 – Voting Theory

    This course examines the underlying mathematical structures and symmetries of elections to explain why different voting procedures can give dramatically different outcomes even if no one changes their vote. Other topics may include the Gibbard-Satterthwaite Theorem concerning the manipulation of elections, Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem, measures of voting power, the theory of apportionment, and nonpolitical applications of consensus theory.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 221 – Linear Algebra

    How might you draw a 3D image on a 2D screen and then “rotate” it? What are the basic notions behind Google’s original, stupefyingly efficient search engine? After measuring the interacting components of a nation’s economy, can one find an equilibrium? Starting with a simple graph of two lines and their equations, we develop a theory for systems of linear equations that answers questions like those posed here. This theory leads to the study of matrices, vectors, linear transformations and geometric properties for all of the above. We learn what “perpendicular” means in high-dimensional spaces and what “stable” means when transforming one linear space into another. Topics also include: matrix algebra, determinants, eigenspaces, orthogonal projections and a theory of vector spaces.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 236 – Multivariable Calculus

    This course is a continuation of the rich field of multivariable calculus begun in Calculus II with an emphasis placed on vector calculus. Topics include vector-valued functions, alternate coordinate systems, vector fields, line integrals, surface integrals, Green’s Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 241 – Theory of Probability

    This course is an introduction to mathematical models of random phenomena and process, including games of chance. Topics include combinatorial analysis, elementary probability measures, conditional probability, random variables, special distributions, expectations, generating functions and limit theorems.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 251 – Methods of Data Analysis

    Second course in statistics for scientific, business and policy decision problems. Case studies are used to examine methods for fitting and assessing models. Emphasis is on problem-solving, interpretation, quantifying uncertainty, mathematical principles and written statistical reports. Topics: ordinary, logistic, Poisson regression, remedial methods, experimental design and resampling methods.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 266 – Operations Research

    An introduction to methods in Operations Research (OR). OR is concerned with modeling/analyzing complex decision problems, such as those in business, medicine transportation, telecommunications and finance. Develop techniques to optimize the efficiency of operating processes. Topics include: linear and nonlinear programming, simplex method, duality theory/applications, transportation problems, dynamic programming.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 298 – Experimental Course

    From time to time, departments design a new course to be offered either on a one-time basis or an experimental basis before deciding whether to make it a regular part of the curriculum. Refer to the course schedule for current listings.

  • Mathematics

    MATH 299 – Independent Study

    An individual or small-group study in mathematics under the direction of an approved advisor. An individual or small group intensively studies a subfield of mathematics not normally taught. An independent study provides an opportunity to go beyond the usual undergraduate curriculum and deeply explore and engage an area of interest. Students are also expected to assume a greater responsibility, in the form of leading discussions and working examples.