Despite being toxic to humans, yews are readily consumed by White-tailed Deer in the winter. Their evergreen foliage makes yews desirable landscape plants. There are several species of yew on the Wheaton campus.

  • COMMON NAME: Yew
  • LATIN NAME: Taxus sp.
  • FAMILY: Taxaceae
  • LOCATION: Next to Park Hall, facing Hebe Courtyard
Despite being toxic to humans, yews are readily consumed by White-tailed Deer in the winter. Their evergreen foliage makes yews desirable landscape plants. There are several species of yew on the Wheaton campus.In late spring male Yews display pollen-producing strobili. Yews are dioecious, having separate "male" and "female" plants.
Yew seeds are covered by a fleshy red aril. The red coloration attacts birds which consume the "fruit", digesting the aril while dispersing the unharmed seed. With the possible exception of the red aril, all parts of the plant are extremely toxic.The flattened evergreen needles of Taxus.
The flaky red bark of Taxus. The straight branches of English Yew were once used for making arrows for long-bows. The bark of Pacific Yew is the source of taxol, a valuable drug in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

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