Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
SILCS

Blog

  • Profile: Washington University in St. Louis

    We are starting a new series to highlight the graduate programs of a few of our sponsoring Consortium members. Each week, we will focus on one program in particular. This week, we will be discussing Washington University in St. Louis. Click on this post to hear more about their program.

    We are starting a new series to highlight the graduate programs of a few of our sponsoring Consortium members. Each week, we will focus on one program in particular. This week, we will be discussing Washington University in St. Louis.

    Washington University’s English and American Literature program is well funded, with students receiving full tuition remission and yearly fellowships worth $18,500 in the 2010-11 academic year. The first three semesters do not require teaching. Students work closely with their mentors and enjoy co-teaching opportunities with experienced faculty. All students enter the program as PhD students, as Washington University does not offer a terminal MA. The deadline for application is January 8, 2011. Teaching begins in fourth semester, with one course per semester. From the program website:

    In recent years, our graduate students have found tenure track positions at institutions such as Drury University, Florida Gulf Coast University, Rutgers, San Francisco State University, Susquehanna University, the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, the University of Dayton, the University of North Carolina, and Wittenberg University. We believe we are successful in placement because of the high level of support we offer in the first three semesters (which do not require any teaching), because of training we offer to our graduate instructors throughout their course of study, and because, with a favorable teaching load for ourselves as well as for our graduate students, we are able as mentors to work closely, individually, and actively with these beginning teachers and scholars. This support has provided our graduates with expert training and the chance to go on to publish books with university presses including those, most recently, of Cambridge, Notre Dame, Oxford, Penn State and Yale.

    Washington University also has a Chancellor’s Graduate Fellowship Program (CGFP), which provides financial support to diverse students interested in careers as college or university professors. The package provides a full tuition scholarship plus an annual stipend and allowance in the amount of $27,500 for the 2010-2011 academic year. The closing date for application to the Fellowship is January 25, 2011.

    In addition, Washington University offers a rigorous two-year MFA program. Last year, the program accepted 12 students out of 350 applicants. All new students receive a complete tuition waiver and a stipend, which in 2010-2011 was $18,500.

  • The new academic year

    The SILCS office reopened for business on September 1st, and so far we have been busy helping last year’s SILCS students with their GREs and graduate school applications. We are grateful for the long list of graduate programs who have already offered to waive their application fees for our students, and to the Educational Testing Service for letting our students take the GREs for half price. The costs of applying to graduate school can certainly add up, and we are glad for the contributions of these programs. Read more to see what else we’re up to.

    The SILCS office reopened for business on September 1st, and so far we have been busy helping last year’s SILCS students with their GREs and graduate school applications. We are grateful for the long list of graduate programs who have already offered to waive their application fees for our students, and to the Educational Testing Service for letting our students take the GREs for half price. The costs of applying to graduate school can certainly add up, and we are glad for the contributions of these programs.

    SILCS Director Paula Krebs recently wrote an article for the Chronicle of Higher Education. In the article, “Doctoral Diversity in the Humanities Won't Be Achieved by Chance”, Dr. Krebs writes about the lack of students of color in doctoral programs, what is being done to change that, and what more can still be done.

    A 2007 MLA report on the status of African-Americans in English showed that, for example, over the past 30 years, no English department other than Howard University's has produced more than six African-American undergraduates who have gone on to Ph.D.'s. In fact, most departments that have sent an African-American on to get a Ph.D. in the past three decades have done just that: sent a single student.

    In the next few months, we will be helping our student apply to graduate school, meeting with the Group for Underrepresented Students in Humanities Education and Research at the University of Delaware, and opening up for applications for SILCS 2011. We will also be in Los Angeles for the Modern Language Association convention on January 6-9, 2011. We hope to see you there!

  • Weeks Three and Four

    The second half of SILCS has gone by very quickly. Dr. Betty Neal Crutcher of Wheaton College spoke to the students on Wednesday, June 16 about mentoring and their plans for the future. The next day, Drs. Sam and Alex Vasquez (from Dartmouth College and Wheaton College, respectively) spoke about their life as a couple in higher ed. That day was also the last day of classes for the students. Read more to see what else we were up to.

    The second half of SILCS has gone by very quickly. Dr. Betty Neal Crutcher of Wheaton College spoke to the students on Wednesday, June 16 about mentoring and their plans for the future. The next day, Drs. Sam and Alex Vasquez (from Dartmouth College and Wheaton College, respectively) spoke about their life as a couple in higher ed. That day was also the last day of classes for the students.

    On Friday, June 18, the students went on their final campus trip. This trip was to Brown University, where they went on a tour of the campus, including the John Carter Brown Library, the Sarah Doyle Women's Center, the Third World Center, and the English Department, and finally visited the John Hay Library.

    This week, the students have been working hard on their papers and presentations while taking a GRE Preparation workshop with Kaplan.

    Yesterday Dr. Gregory Colón-Semenza from the University of Connecticut came to speak to the students in the morning. In the afternoon was our graduate recruitment fair, where directors of graduate studies from a number of different institutes came to speak individually with the students. In attendance were:

    Dr. Chris Okonkwo from the University of Missouri
    Dr. Bret Benjamin and Dr. Pat Chu from the SUNY University at Albany
    Dr. Tim Bewes and Dr. Rolland Murray from Brown University
    Dr. Ed Larkin from the University of Delaware
    Dr. Dovev Levine-Leung from the University of New Hampshire
    Dr. Elda Maria Roman from Stanford University
    Dr. Nicole Aljoe from Northeastern University
    Dr. Badia Ahad from Loyola University Chicago
    Dr. Erin Mackie from Syracuse University
    and Dr. Darryl Dickson-Carr from Southern Methodist University

    This morning, the students presented their research in a final symposium. Tomorrow, everyone will be heading home for some much needed rest. Thanks to everyone involved for making this a fantastic year!

  • Week Two

    We have officially passed the halfway point of SILCS 2010. The past week has been quite busy. Dr. Ania Loomba from the University of Pennsylvania arrived on Monday to speak to the students about her research. On Wednesday, staff member Mecca Sullivan flew to England to present her short story “Sererie” at the Dissident Citizenship: Queer Postcolonial Belonging conference at the University of Sussex. Congratulations, Mecca.

    We have officially passed the halfway point of SILCS 2010. The past week has been quite busy. Dr. Ania Loomba from the University of Pennsylvania arrived on Monday to speak to the students about her research. On Wednesday, staff member Mecca Sullivan flew to England to present her short story “Sererie” at the Dissident Citizenship: Queer Postcolonial Belonging conference at the University of Sussex. Congratulations, Mecca.

    Dr. Valerie Lee was scheduled to speak to the students on Thursday but the airlines had other plans and she wasn't able to make it. Instead, we will see her next Sunday, June 20.

    On Friday, the students visited Boston University, including the English Department and the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, where they visited exhibits such as SOLDIERS FOR EQUALITY: From Phillis Wheatley to the 20th Century. This was our first trip to Boston University. We thank Dr. Anita Patterson and Dr. Laura Korobkin in the English department and Ryan Hendrickson and Sean Noel in the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Archive for their hospitality.

  • Week One

    Nineteen students and staff converged on Wheaton College campus this week for the start of SILCS 2010. Everyone arrived on Saturday, May 30, to some gorgeous weather on campus. Read more to see what we were up to.

    Nineteen students and staff converged on Wheaton College campus this week for the start of SILCS 2010. Everyone arrived on Saturday, May 30, to some gorgeous weather on campus.

    Sunday morning dawned bright and early with a trip to Project Adventure in Beverly, MA. This was a first for everyone, staff included. Project Adventure uses a number of outdoor activities to help encourage teamwork and let everyone get to know each other, and gave everyone a day to relax and have fun before their coursework began.

    One of the activities included a 50 foot high log suspended between two trees. After donning harnesses, everyone got a chance to climb the trees and walk across the log at the top, then get lowered down by rope. From the top, it looked a lot higher than it had seemed…

    Monday morning was the first day of classes, despite the holiday. Dr. Robyn Warhol-Down of The Ohio State University joined SILCS once again as the instructor. On Tuesday, Dr. Dagmawi Woubshet of Cornell University gave a lecture to the students on his research.

    This afternoon, the students enjoyed a lovely lunch with Wheaton College President Ronald Crutcher and his wife, Dr. Betty Neal Crutcher. This evening, Dr. Keith Gilyard of Pennsylvania State University will be joining us to discuss his own work, and tomorrow the students will be visiting the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard College. Keep watching this space for more updates!

  • SILCS News for March

    Congratulations to Mecca Sullivan for winning second place in the American Short Fiction Short Story Contest! Read more.

    Congratulations to Mecca Sullivan for winning second place in the American Short Fiction Short Story Contest!

    SILCS Director Paula Krebs, Mecca Sullivan of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Beth McCoy of the State University of New York Geneseo, and Dr. Lena Hill of the University of Iowa attended the Seventh Annual Yale Bouchet Conference on Diversity in Graduate Education this weekend, where they presented their panel, “Direct Intervention: A Summer Diversity Institute in the Humanities”.

    And finally, we would like to welcome our SILCS class of 2010, who will be joining us this June. Congratulations to all of those who were accepted. We are looking forward to seeing you soon!

  • Application deadline for 2010

    The deadline for applying for SILCS 2010 is Wednesday, February 10th. If you are planning on applying, please don’t miss it! Due to the blizzard that is expected to hit tomorrow, there may not be someone in the office all day, especially in the late afternoon, but we will be checking email.

    The deadline for applying for SILCS 2010 is Wednesday, February 10th. If you are planning on applying, please don't miss it! Due to the blizzard that is expected to hit tomorrow, there may not be someone in the office all day, especially in the late afternoon, but we will be checking email. If you have any questions or problems, please email us at silcs [at] wheatonma [dot] edu. Good luck!

  • Applications for SILCS 2010

    Application forms for SILCS 2010 have been added to our how to apply page. We will accept applications between Jan 4, 2010 and Feb 10, 2010. Please click through to see what is required.

    Application forms for SILCS 2010 have been added to our how to apply page. We will accept applications between Jan 4, 2010 and Feb 10, 2010. Please note that our application requires the following:

    • A completed application form with attached writing sample that you will work with during the Institute for use as a graduate application essay.
    • A signed sponsor form by a faculty member in your department who is willing to mentor you over the next year as you begin to apply for graduate programs.
    • An official transcript.
    • A confidential online survey. Information about this survey will be sent to you once you have completed the rest of the application.

    We wish you the best of luck!

  • SILCS grads in the news

    Recent SILCS graduate Sametta Taylor was profiled by her local newspaper in July about her “life-changing experience” at SILCS. You can read the article in the Berkley Independent here.

    Recent SILCS graduate Sametta Taylor was profiled by her local newspaper in July about her "life-changing experience" at SILCS. You can read the article in the Berkley Independent here.

  • News: Ph.D. enrollment growth

    The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) has released its annual report for 2008, Graduate Enrollment and Degrees: 1998 to 2008. Enrollment for all U.S. minority groups increased 4.5%, compared the 1.5% increase for White, non-Hispanic students, and nearly all minority groups saw greater growth in 2008 than the average annual change from 1998-2008. Read more.

    The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) has released its annual report for 2008, Graduate Enrollment and Degrees: 1998 to 2008. Enrollment for all U.S. minority groups increased 4.5%, compared the 1.5% increase for White, non-Hispanic students, and nearly all minority groups saw greater growth in 2008 than the average annual change from 1998-2008.

    Growth in first-time enrollment from 2007 to 2008 was greater for students from all racial/ethnic minority groups than for White students: 10.6% for Hispanics/Latinos, 8.8% for American Indians/Alaskan Natives, 6.7% for Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 6.5% for Blacks/African Americans, compared to 3.5% for Whites.

    The one ethnic group that did not see a greater growth than average was Blacks/African Americans. The 6.5% growth was the lowest growth for all other groups except Whites and was lower than the average of 7.6%.

    Similarly, though all fields showed moderate growth in enrollment, only the Arts and Humanities demonstrated a lower growth rate than the average for that field and the lowest growth rate of all other fields in the study. This was particularly the case in terms of Black/African Americans, who only showed a 1.6% average annual increase in Arts and Humanities, the smallest growth of all ethnic groups.

    Inside Higher Ed noted that “many graduate programs have for years now been creating programs to diversify their pool of students, and [Nathan E. Bell, director of research and policy analysis for CGS] said that he hoped the data suggest that those efforts are starting to pay off. He noted that many of these efforts were destined to take a while to show returns.”