Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
SILCS

Blog

  • SILCS 2011 Weeks 3 and 4 and beyond

    The Summer Institute has come to another successful conclusion. We had a great month and made a lot of close friends who we hope will stay in touch. Have a great summer, everyone! Read more to see what we were up to in these last few weeks.

    The Summer Institute has come to another successful conclusion. We had a great month and made a lot of close friends who we hope will stay in touch. Have a great summer, everyone!

    In the second half of the month, we listened to lectures from Dr. Daniel Kim of Brown University, Dr. Tanya Rodrigue of Wheaton College, Dr. Greg Colón-Semenza of the University of Connecticut, and Dr. Darryl Dickson-Carr of Southern Methodist University. All of them gave information on their own research and tips on the graduate application process. In addition, on June 17 we visited the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research in Cambridge.

    On Friday, June 24, we celebrated our fourth annual Graduate Recruitment Fair, where such schools as Tufts University, Stanford University, SUNY Albany, Syracuse University, Washington University in St. Louis, Southern Methodist University and Northeastern University set up tables and spoke individually with each student about their graduate programs. The next day, the students presented their work in a Symposium in front of their classmates and returning alumnae/i from the previous year.

    This fall, we plan to make SILCS better than ever, with the help of our new team of alumnae/i coordinators. Now the SILCS office closes once more for the summer, but we will be back again in September, ready to start preparing for SILCS 2012!

  • SILCS 2011 Weeks 1 and 2

    SILCS 2011 is nearly halfway over, and the students are working hard. As usual, the month has passed very quickly, and we’re fast approaching our final symposium, where the students will present their work. Read more to see what we were up to.

    SILCS 2011 is nearly halfway over, and the students are working hard. As usual, the month has passed very quickly, and we're fast approaching our final symposium, where the students will present their work.

    Everyone arrived on campus over Memorial Day weekend, where the weather was unseasonably warm for Massachusetts. As in the past, we visited Project Adventure and learned a lot about each other as we worked together on team goals. The day ended with a BBQ on the campus green.

    The first week, Drs. Sam and Alex Vasquez (of Dartmouth College and Wheaton College, respectively) came to talk about their dual careers and balancing graduate school and family life. On Monday, June 6, Dr. Gillian Johns (of Oberlin College) came to talk about her own work. The students also visited Brown University's John Carter Brown Library and Boston University's English department and Gotlieb Research Center.

    This week, we're looking forward to more lectures and trips, and are trying to stay warm after the heat wave suddenly turned into cold rain. Stay tuned!

  • Congratulations

    We would like to congratulate our students from SILCS 2009 and 2010 who have been accepted into a number of graduate programs. Click on this post to see where they got in.

    We would like to congratulate our students from SILCS 2009 and 2010 who have been accepted into the following programs:

    Indiana University
    Ohio State University
    Rutgers University New Brunswick
    Syracuse University
    University of California, Berkeley
    University of California, Los Angeles
    University of Florida
    University of Michigan

    We will update this list as we hear more!

  • EXTENDED DEADLINE

    We have extended the deadline to this Friday, Feb 18. If you were planning on applying to SILCS but couldn’t make the deadline, you have another chance. Apply now!

    We have extended the deadline to this Friday, Feb 18. If you were planning on applying to SILCS but couldn't make the deadline, you have another chance. Apply now!

  • Deadline TOMORROW, Feb 11

    Our application deadline is TOMORROW, February 11. Your mailed materials must be postmarked by that date, and we should receive your emailed application by tomorrow at midnight.

    Our application deadline is TOMORROW, February 11. Your mailed materials must be postmarked by that date, and we should receive your emailed application by tomorrow at midnight.

    PLEASE NOTE: If you are having trouble faxing, please email us (see email address in sidebar) or call us at (508) 286 3745. Most faxes get through, but on occasion some do not.

  • Application Deadline: Feb 11

    We are currently accepting applications for SILCS 2011. You can find out information on how to apply on our application page. The deadline is Friday, February 11, 2011. If you can, try not to wait until the last minute, so you can be sure that all of the parts of the application arrive on time. We look forward to hearing from you. Good luck!

    We are currently accepting applications for SILCS 2011. You can find out information on how to apply on our application page. The deadline is Friday, February 11, 2011. If you can, try not to wait until the last minute, so you can be sure that all of the parts of the application arrive on time. We look forward to hearing from you. Good luck!

  • Profile: Syracuse University

    Syracuse University is the final program in our series of graduate program profiles. Syracuse offers an M.A. and Ph.D. in English and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing. Click on this post to hear more about their program.

    Syracuse University is the final program in our series of graduate program profiles. Syracuse offers an M.A. and Ph.D. in English and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing.

    The department, which is internationally known for its innovative undergraduate curriculum in English and Textual Studies (ETS), also has one of the most intellectually versatile graduate programs in the country. Recognizing the complex discipline that "English" has become in the contemporary university and in today's society, our graduate program is organized around critical studies of history, aesthetics, and politics. We have particular strengths in early modern literature, Victorian culture, American studies, and film, but cover other areas as well, and our outstanding faculty all share a strong interest in literary history and forms, critical theory, and cultural studies. The particular specializations of our diverse faculty thus allow for both continuity and flexibility in the work that students can do while in the program.

    In the Syracuse Ph.D. and M.A. programs, students work closely with their faculty mentors and attend small seminars. Ph.D. students take a workshop that helps them prepare for the qualifying exams and their dissertation. Syracuse maintains close ties with Cornell University and the University of Rochester, allowing students to attend courses and workshops on all three campuses. Students can enter the Ph.D. program directly from the B.A. or with the M.A. in hand. To complete the M.A., students submit and defend three papers.

    The M.F.A. program, which takes three years, culminates in a book-length manuscript of poetry or fiction. Exceptional M.F.A. students are eligible for a university fellowship, which includes full tuition and a $16,720 stipend. There are also six creative writing scholarships awarded to new students.

    All three programs include teaching assistantships and fellowships. Multi-year university fellowships are awarded to Ph.D. students, alternating with teaching assistantships, and include a stipend of $21,170 and a full-tuition scholarship for 30 credits for the academic year. African American Fellowships are also awarded to six African American graduate students.

    The deadline for all programs is January 9.

  • Profile: Stanford University

    The fourth in our series on graduate programs is Stanford University. The application deadline for Stanford (December 7, 2010) has passed, but we wanted to cover them for next year’s applicants. Click on this post to hear more about their program.

    The fourth in our series on graduate programs is Stanford University. The application deadline for Stanford (December 7, 2010) has passed, but we wanted to cover them for next year’s applicants.

    The English Department seeks to teach and promote an understanding of both the significance and the history of British and American literature (broadly defined) and to foster an appreciation of the richness and variety of texts in the language. It offers rigorous training in interpretive thinking and precise expression. Our English graduate program features the study of what imaginative language, rhetoric, and narrative art has done, can do, and will do in life, and it focuses on the roles creative writing and representations play in almost every aspect of modern experience. Completing the Ph.D. program prepares a student for full participation as a scholar and literary critic in the profession.

    Each year, Stanford accepts 7-9 students out of an applicant pool of 350. Those students who are accepted receive a five-year funding package, with more funding available for a sixth year. The funding covers tuition, health insurance, and living expenses and also includes four summers of research travel, language study, and conferences.

    Students teach for one quarter in their first and fourth years and two quarters in their second year. The teaching in the first and fourth year includes leading two discussion sections for an undergraduate literature course. In the second year, students teach a self-designed course in writing and rhetoric.

    Applicants must take both the General GRE and the Subject Test in Literature. Stanford does not offer a terminal M.A. or an M.F.A.

    Recent graduates of Stanford have obtained tenure-track positions at such institutions as Yale University, Boston University, Columbia University, University of Maryland, University of Chicago, University of Georgia, UC Santa Barbara, University of Washington, and the University of Toronto.

  • Profile: Cornell University

    In our third profile of graduate programs, we are discussing Cornell University. The graduate program in English Language and Literature enrolls twenty students per year in its Ph.D., M.F.A. and joint M.F.A./Ph.D. programs. Click on this post to hear more about their program.

    In our third profile of graduate programs, we are discussing Cornell University. The graduate program in English Language and Literature enrolls twenty students per year in its Ph.D., M.F.A. and joint M.F.A./Ph.D. programs.

    Courses for undergraduates range from Chaucer, Shakespeare, and James Joyce to critical theory, creative writing, cultural studies, and ethnic American literatures. The Honors Program challenges English majors to produce a major critical project as the culmination of their degree. The Ph.D. and M.F.A. programs enable advanced students to pursue intensive study with a distinguished faculty committed to creative and intellectual community. Courses and related programs link students at all levels with interdisciplinary opportunities on campus, while a lively series of speakers, colloquia, and conferences provide a context for sustained learning and debate within the humanities.

    The Ph.D. program enrolls about twelve students per year. Students design their own courses of study. In the fourth semester, students must pass the Advancement to Candidacy Examination in order to proceed toward the Ph.D., prior to their dissertation.

    The M.F.A. program enrolls eight students per year, four each in poetry and fiction. The two-year program culminates in the completion of a book length manuscript.

    A small number of students enroll in the joint M.F.A./Ph.D. program, which takes five years and includes writing workshop courses and Ph.D. seminars for credit. At the end of the fourth semester, candidates submit the M.F.A. thesis and receive the M.F.A. degree, then go on to complete the Ph.D. and dissertation.

    Students in the Ph.D. and joint M.F.A./Ph.D. programs are offered five years of funding, including a first-year non-teaching fellowship with a full tuition fellowship; two years of Teaching Assistantships with full tuition fellowships; a fourth-year non-teaching fellowship for the dissertation writing year, with a full tuition fellowship; a fifth-year Teaching Assistantship with full tuition fellowship; summer support for four years; a stipend; and health insurance.

    Students in the M.F.A. program receive two years of funding, including a first-year Graduate Assistantship working at Epoch, a periodical of contemporary literature published by the Creative Writing staff of the Department of English; a first-summer teaching assistantship, which is linked to a teachers training program for which residency is required; a second-year Teaching Assistantship with a full tuition fellowship; a second summer fellowship; a stipend; and health insurance.

    The deadline for all programs is December 15.

  • Profile: University of Pennsylvania

    In the second in our series of graduate program profiles of our sponsoring Consortium members, we will be discussing the University of Pennsylvania. Click on this post to read more about their program.

    In the second in our series of graduate program profiles of our sponsoring Consortium members, we will be discussing the University of Pennsylvania. From the English Department website:

    One indication of our interdisciplinary orientation is that our faculty are serving or have recently served as directors of the Penn Humanities Forum, Kelly Writers House, the Material Text Seminar, the The Center for Africana Studies , the South Asia Center, and the Programs in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, Cinema Studies, and have won more teaching awards than any other department in the School. Our undergraduate Alumni have gone on to highly successful careers in advertising, publishing, journalism, law, information technology, and other fields; many of them participate in our Career Nights or have joined our English Career Liaison Database, providing a network of helpful contacts for current Penn English Majors.

    U Penn has an English graduate program that enrolls 5 Masters students and 12 Ph.D. students per year. The terminal Masters program, which takes place in one year, is a challenging option for those not able to make the longer commitment of the Ph.D. program. Students provide their own funding.

    Students in the five-year Ph.D. program all receive the Benjamin Franklin Fellowship, which covers tuition, general fees, and health insurance for 5 years. The total value of the fellowship for one year, including all benefits, was $53,000 in 2008-09. In addition, U Penn offers the William Fontaine Fellowship to African-American/Black, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, and Native American students.

    The U Penn English department works closely with students on job placement after graduation, and over the past nine years has placed 66% of graduates in first-time tenure-track positions at a range of colleges and universities.

    The deadline for application for graduate study at U Penn is December 15, 2010.