Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts

Sara Nausch ’11

sophomore symposium smile

  • Associate
  • K2 Partnering Solutions, Boston

A sociology and history major at Wheaton, Sara Nausch works in the staffing end of the technology industry, assessing the hiring needs of chief information officers and IT managers and connecting them with talented professionals throughout the United States.

She typically engages with executives when they are implementing a new system or enhancing an existing one. “I have an interesting perspective on the technology industry, because I’m able to see trends on both sides of the table.” She knows what companies are looking for in new hires, and she also understands what job seekers expect from employers.

Women in technology
In the spirit of the Sit With Me project, the Quarterly is showcasing several alumnae working in the industry. Coming from backgrounds that include a variety of majors and working in a wide range of jobs, from designing Navy destroyers to creating educational software, they illustrate the many opportunities available and the many paths into the field that a liberal arts education offers.

“To be successful, you need to listen to your client, develop a plan for implementation, and articulate to your team what needs to be done,” she says.

Although Nausch knows that women excel in this work, it is still a male-dominated industry, she says. “I don’t see many female IT managers and have yet to speak with a female CIO. You must be a trailblazer. Be prepared to be the only female on-site. Relish in that fact and make your voice heard.”

Pamela “Pam” Perkins Au ’81

Pamela “Pam” Perkins Au ’81

  • Director, information technology quality and compliance strategy
  • Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, N.J.

Pam Au didn’t expect to work in technology, but an opportunity to be a pioneer in the early ’80s changed her mind. After interning for Congresswoman Margaret Heckler, the government major was offered a position in business applications programming at Merrill Lynch.

“Wall Street was making a huge investment in technology. There were few women in IT in the brokerage industry, and it was an opportunity to learn, grow and develop,” she says.

She went through a 12-week training program, learning COBOL and other programming languages. “It was really technical,” she says. “To this day, I am so proud of making it through that training.”

Women in technology
In the spirit of the Sit With Me project, the Quarterly is showcasing several alumnae working in the industry. Coming from backgrounds that include a variety of majors and working in a wide range of jobs, from designing Navy destroyers to creating educational software, they illustrate the many opportunities available and the many paths into the field that a liberal arts education offers.

Now Au is responsible for the development and execution of Johnson & Johnson’s global IT quality and compliance strategy. She recently led a team to transform the way IT systems and services are delivered by streamlining the systems development life-cycle process and making it more user-friendly.

“As a liberal arts major, I learned to look at things holistically,” she says. “[Professor of Political Science] Darlene Boroviak taught me not to set boundaries.”

With more than 30 years in IT, Au enjoys serving as a mentor to young women and men interested in technology careers. “It’s what I love most about my job,” she says. “Everything I’ve accomplished, I’ve accomplished by working with people in teams.”

Bridget Pulice ’08

Bridget Pulice ’08National success consultant

Bullhorn, Inc., Boston

An Italian studies major with a minor in psychology, Bridget Pulice was recruited by Bullhorn at a job fair at Wheaton. “I did not intend to pursue a career in technology,” she says.

The Boston-based company is a global leader in the production of software that helps recruiting professionals track applicants.

Initially hired as a technical support analyst, where she provided phone and email assistance to customers in 150 countries, she now works primarily with dissatisfied clients who are at risk for terminating their contracts. Pulling from her Wheaton toolbox, she facilitates relationships with these clients as she works to identify and solve their issues. Her efforts have resulted in a 95 percent retention rate.

Women in technology
In the spirit of the Sit With Me project, the Quarterly is showcasing several alumnae working in the industry. Coming from backgrounds that include a variety of majors and working in a wide range of jobs, from designing Navy destroyers to creating educational software, they illustrate the many opportunities available and the many paths into the field that a liberal arts education offers.

Though her work record is impressive, Pulice is most proud of earning her master’s degree in international relations and communications in 2012 from Boston University while working full time at Bullhorn.

“One of the best things about Wheaton is that everyone has a voice,” she says. “I was never afraid to speak up in the classroom, and this has certainly helped my confidence and communication skills in the workplace.”

Pulice says her undergraduate education gave her a variety of skills and knowledge about a range of topics.

“Thanks to Wheaton, I have all the tools I need to learn new things and succeed in any path,” she says. “You want me to converse in another language? Sure. You want me to fix your computer? No problem.”

GoBeyond-feature

The giving tree

Pareskys sow opportunities

650_Paresky-9It’s a brilliant June morning on campus. Just outside of Balfour-Hood Center, two beautiful English oak trees sway in the breeze. The “coed oaks”—as they are affectionately known—were a gift of Susan “Sue” Stampler Paresky ’68 and her husband, Joseph.

The year was 1988, and Paresky, who was director of alumnae affairs at the time, planted the trees to commemorate a historic event in the story of the college: Wheaton was going co-ed.

But those weren’t the only seeds the Pareskys planted. That same year, the couple established the Joseph M. and Susan Stampler Paresky ’68 Fellowship to provide financial assistance to recent Wheaton graduates pursuing graduate studies. The Paresky Fellowship is still going strong, and 2013 marks its 25th anniversary.

Like the oak trees she planted 25 years ago, Susan Paresky’s roots run deep into the soil of Wheaton. After graduating, she married her husband on campus at Cole Memorial Chapel in 1972. She became director of alumnae affairs in 1982, set up the Paresky Fellowship in 1988, and from 1993 to 2003, she was a Trustee of the college, working on major issues like enrollment, budgets, strategic planning and, of course, fundraising.   [Read more...]