Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
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Davis Colloquium

Wheaton students present at conference on Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Four Wheaton students presented research at the 17th Annual Undergraduate Colloquium on Russian and Eurasian Studies sponsored by the Davis Center at Harvard University.

The colloquium is an annual event that provides a forum for calling attention to the best undergraduate work on Russian and Eurasian political and social culture. Undergraduates from Wheaton, Wellesley and Harvard are invited to participate in the yearly symposium.

The presentations made by Wheaton's students this year covered timely topics, such as a comparative examination of Russian and Chinese conceptions of democratization, the status of a Buddhist ethnic group in Russia, and Central Asian migration to Russia.

The students who presented their work at the conference were:

  • Stephanie Antetomaso '12, a resident of Woburn, Mass., presented her research in a paper entitled, "A Computational Analysis of Nabokov’s Works." An independent major in Linguistics and a major in Russian Studies who graduated magna cum laude, Antetomaso has won a Fulbright scholarship to Estonia to pursue further study of linguistics.
  • Ke (Frances) Feng '13, a double major in international relations and political science who is from Beijing, China, presented a paper entitled, "Perceptions of Democracy in Post-Communist Era--A Comparison between Russia and China."
  • Katie A. Mosher '12,  a resident of Bow, N.H. who graduated magna cum laude with a double major in International Relations and Russian Studies, presented "Managing Migrantophobia: The Human Security Approach and Central Asian migration to the Russian Federation."
  • Krista Williamson '12, a Camden, Maine resident who graduated with a double major in International Relations and Russian Studies, presented a paper entitled, "Buddhism in Siberia."

Antetomaso and Mosher drew their presentations from their senior honors theses; Feng and Williamson extended work done in classes taught by Prof. Wilson for the symposium.