Wheaton College Norton, Massachusetts
Wheaton College
Faculty

Academics

Jonathan David Walsh

Jonathan David Walsh

Professor of French Studies
Degrees

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara
B.A., University of Connecticut, Storrs

Research Interests

The French novel; Psychoanalysis and literature; Economics and literature. Empathy in Ancien Regime Fiction. My research focuses on eighteenth-century French novels, essays and newsletters.

Teaching Interests

I teach courses on French language, culture and literature, especially the novelists, the philosophes and cinema. The French often refer to film as "the seventh art," an indication of its prestige as a genre. In "Introduction to French Cinema" we explore some of the most influential French films, from Jean Renoir to Jacques Audiard. In "Introduction to French Culture" we study what it is to be French, looking at values, education, politics, immigration identity and France in the EU. I also teach a course on Francophone women authors from France, Canada, Haiti, Martinique, Senegal, Cameroun and Tunisia. Through the lense of postmodern French feminist ideas (Cixous, Leclerc, et al), we read the fiction of some great women writers (including Duras, Ernaux, Ba, Beyala, Djebar).

Other Interests

Serge Gainsbourg, jazz, fishing, the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker, oenophilia, cheese--not necessarily in that order.

Publications

"A Cultural Numismatics: the 'chain' of economics in Montesquieu's Persian Letters." Australian Journal of French Studies, Spring 2009.

"Edward Said's Humanism and Democratic Criticism: Bridging the Gap Between the Humanities and the Public Sphere in the Post-9/11 World." The International Journal of the Humanities, vol. 4, 2006. Available at: www.humanities-journal.com

"National Identity, Sociability, and the European Enlightenment: the case of Le Journal Etranger (1754-62)." In The European Enlightenment in its Relation to the Other Great Cultures and Religions of the Eighteenth Century. Paris: Champion, 2004.

"Littérature et caractère national d'après Prévost et Grimm." In L'Abbé Prévost au tournant du siècle. SVEC 11 (2000): 103-110.

"Real and Symbolic Exchange in Prévost's Histoire d'une Grecque moderne." The French Review 74.1 (October 2000): 94-105.

"Jealousy, Envy and Hermeneutics in Abbé Prévost's L'histoire d'une Grecque moderne and Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu." Romance Quarterly 42.2 (1995): 67-81.

"Abbé Prévost's Histoire d'une Grecque moderne: Figures of Authority on Trial." Birmingham, Alabama: Summa Publications, 2001.

Student Projects

I have directed several honor theses in French Studies, including "Problems of Immigration in the French Public Schools, 1989-1994"; "The Future of Quebec and anglo-francophone relations in event of a 'No' vote on Independence"; "The Spectacle of Power: the Image of Louis XIV through the Customs and Costume of his Court." These projects have been a rewarding learning experience for me and I look forward to directing others. They are available in the Wallace Library Archives.